Aussies Living Simply

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  • #521977
    pavkapavka
    Member

    You don’t need the 800 grams all at once. The first day I only put a cup of flour, the next I add another cup, then 2 cups and the last day another 2 or 3 cups so it’s spread over 4 or 5 days. Of course, you can make 800 grams at once but it tends to be boring and tiring.

    BTW, my bread always ends up soggy on the inside and not too “fluffy” – any ideas about this (pls have in mind I have practically no experience, so maybe I am missing something basic).

    #521975
    pavkapavka
    Member

    I ended up with one from Amazon (link) – somewhat smaller than what I had in mind, but works pretty well if you don’t want more than, say, half a kilo of flour at a time. Which works fine for me, because with sourdough bread you add the flour gradually over three or four days.

    #521919
    pavkapavka
    Member

    hillbilly girl post=340174 wrote: If she can spare the time to take a book over and sit reading for a while so he can approach her, rather than the other way around, things might ease up a bit.

    We went away for 5 days last year, and we had a friend come every day and check on the cat. This is what she did – just sat on the patio reading until he appeared and started complaining with many a sad “miaow”, then she fed him etc. He knew her already, but was hesitant to approach her at first. He took a couple of days to settle after we came back, just miaow-ing sadly when he remembered how we left him alone…

    #515798
    pavkapavka
    Member

    We get raw milk through HerdShare / Foodconnect. You buy a share, become a shareholder and technically you do not “buy” the milk, but “get it from your own cows”, or at least that’s the legal theory behind the scheme. It’s delivered once a week in some member’s driveway, where you go and get it.

    #514929
    pavkapavka
    Member

    1. Military – no, it’s only a town not a country 🙂 Local police though – yes.

    2. Local taxes, yes (e.g. just ordinary council rates).

    3. Education… I have this vision of a new (or rather – old :-)) type of school, with teachers etc. but no computers, where children have to do their own stuff instead of getting computers to do it for them.

    4. Doctors, midwives – yes. Roman medicine was actually pretty advanced. However, there will come a point where someone will require modern treatment and I guess they’ll have to leave the town for that.

    5. Religion – yes, all of them :-). The Ancients were pretty tolerant, before Christianity appeared. There was an official “State” religion (on which we can base festivals), but it wasn’t forced on anyone – not until much later (I’m aiming for the period of I century BC – I AD, before the period of Nero and the other crazy emperors).

    #515739
    pavkapavka
    Member

    Actually, I find Linux a lot easier to use than Windows. What you say *used to* be true some time ago – it did require a learning curve, you did need to know how to go “under the hood” etc. This hasn’t been the case in the last couple of years though. Fedora, Ubuntu and most other distro’s have a desktop interface you are familiar with (icons on a desktop, menu with programs in folders etc.) so you only need to learn just where the link to your program is, or what the equivalent of program X for windows is called here (e.g. – instead of using Outlook, you use Thunderbird). Centralised software managers make installing stuff a breeze. Yes, it still needs some learning (and un-learning some habits), but for normal everyday stuff you can be up and running tomorrow.

    What I did (back when it was more difficult to switch :-)) was – I installed Linux on my laptop and kept Windows on the desktop PC. I started switching by tasks – now I do my web browsing on the laptop, then Office etc., until no tasks remained that required me to go fire up the Windows machine to do them. Then I installed Linux there too.

    #515737
    pavkapavka
    Member

    I haven’t touched Windows or any other commercial software for something like 6 or 7 years now. I’m a web programmer and PhD student, so I spend most of my time online and I have to say I haven’t felt in any way limited by the software – anything I want to do, I can do with it… (with the notable exception of filing my tax return, for which I had to run Windows in a virtual machine)

    Apart from Ubuntu, you can also look up Fedora.

    Re viruses: there are no viruses for Linux, and that’s due to an inherent characteristic of the OS: whatever you install cannot have more “rights” (access) than you do. So, if you run a virus as an end-user, the virus has the rights of an end-user which is practically zero. However, I’ve had a system hit (back when I was assistant sys-admin of an ISP) by a “worm” and that’s a different beast. Where a virus “infects” the system by being run by an inside user, a worm actually hacks the system from the outside, installs itself and then propagates by hacking other systems from yours. Worms DO exist for Linux, although a fully-patched system should have no worries normally (and I have to highly commend the update system of Linux, Windows users can’t even dream of something that automatically updates ALL their software with the click of a button).

    #486355
    pavkapavka
    Member

    You might also check out the Eco Village in Currumbin – theecovillage.com.au

    #514926
    pavkapavka
    Member

    Hi Andre,

    please feel invited to the project, it’s people like you that I came here to look for 🙂

    To answer your questions (or observations) one by one:

    “the majority of the public (excluding us of course) don’t think for a moment we took a wrong turn” – many don’t think at all… The project is not for the majority but for a small minority.

    “And those that do are too lazy, ignorant or greedy to make the change.” – I haven’t formalised the answer to that yet, but the idea is to make “greed” work for the project – yes, I know people are lazy (I am a lazy person myself too). So – enter greed… If you help advance the project – you get A, B, C etc. in return (become a Patrician, get some perks… haven’t come up with a list yet). Also, I realise people will have to give up a lot if they go and live in such a place. In the way of compensation, a serious effort will be made to make life interesting there – the job of the city magistrates will be to come up with festivals, spectacles etc. (come to think of it, that was the case in Rome too :-)).

    “What are your council’s regulations to property sharing?” – there will be one actual title on all the land. Within that, the council will give out (or sell) “virtual” titles (or 99-year leases). These will carry conditions – if you don’t play by the rules, you get two weeks notice and leave. So, in one sense, you will “own” a plot of land and be free to build a house there, or a pub or smithy or whatever else you want provided it’s compatible with the overall experience. If you want a McDonald’s franchise – you are out.

    “they fell by the wayside” – yes, because they tried to a) be totally artificial and just imitate the real thing (Old Sydney Town), or had nothing to stimulate people to actually go there and do something (Crossroads). I’ll do my best to differentiate from these, but it will be an ongoing struggle.

    “disagreement about something” – Roman-style democracy (Late Republic)… The Plebs vote, they can be outvoted by the upper classes, they can be trumped by the Senate and the Senate can be veto-ed by the Dictator.

    “people not pulling there weight/doing their share” – that’s why the Romans had formalised “economic classes” – you belonged to First Class, Second Class etc. depending on your property and the taxes you pay. The lower you go – the less your vote weighs. So, you are free to contribute as much as you want, but if you don’t – you lose your political representation.

    “shareholders just deciding to sell up and leave” – hopefully not all of them at the same time… There will be some turnover obviously. It will have to be an on-going balancing act between privileges you get and what you have to do. That’s why the whole thing will be positioned as FUN in the first place…

    “What can be done to avoid these situations?” – Senate, Plebian Assembly and full-time politicking in the Forum :-)). (which also comes under the heading of “fun” – when was the last time you had the opportunity to actually debate a point of politics with the people who rule the country? in person?)

    #514923
    pavkapavka
    Member

    Yes, it is ironic to use the internet… However, modern communications have made all other methods of communications extinct, so I can’t employ a “town crier” to shout out the idea at a public gathering where it will be heard.

    Another part of my rant is the death of normal communication… People used to write letters to each other before. Long, informative letters, where you actually sat down and spent a couple of hours composing the letter. In this way, you a) made the letter meaningful, b) since you were writing it in person (and on expensive paper!) you tended to keep junk out of it, and (most importantly) c) when trying to compose it and work out what you want to say, you spent time THINKING and ordered things for yourself, in your head, first. With email and instant messaging now – fast, free, unlimited, “always on” what happens is – you send short notes, you don’t think, you don’t care – “because I can always clarify things later” and you end up knowing what your “friends” had for breakfast, but not knowing anything important about their lives.

    Not to mention the fact that the “web” is so huge now that whatever you publish will probably end up not being read by the people you want to reach because they can’t find it… (that’s the topic of my PhD research, incidentally :-)).

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