Aussies Living Simply

Yacon

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 24 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #243043
    meg53
    Member

    In summer I experimented and planted a Yacon Polymnia sonchifolia. apparently it is related to the sunflower and produces large edible tubers.

    They grew into triffid looking plants 😉 and now I have discovered they have cute little yellow flower heads.

    My question for all you experienced gardeners out there; is when do I attempt to harvest these promised tubers. Someone told me when they die down in winter, is this correct?

    Cheers

    -Meg

    #339408
    Bubba Louie
    Member

    Here’s Green Harvest’s growing notes.

    http://www.greenharvest.com.au/Plants/yacon_info.html

    #339409
    worowa
    Member

    Yep Meg, anytime from now onwards you can ‘bandicoot’ a couple to try. They’re a bit like Jerusalem artichokes, but sweeter. When winter hits, and the clump is big, just pull the whole lot up.

    #339410
    Anja
    Member

    Since I read the article on yacon in Warm Earth magazine (May 2007) I have wanted to grow some. I still have the mag open next to my computer to remind to look it up every now and then. Unfortunately, I still haven’t been able to source any in Melbourne. Does any one know where I can get some???

    #339411
    jennifer g
    Member

    I was lucky enough to get my hands on some at the local permaculture gardens..finally! have been hanging out for some. Can’t wait to try the carroty apple taste i keep hearing about..yummmmm.

    Annie, i know you can get it up here in QLD, but usually it becomes more available in spring i hear, thats when green harvest have it available in there catalogue.

    #339412
    Steve
    Keymaster

    I bought a tuber from Green Harvest and planted it last September. It is still growing strongly so I am like you Meg and wondering when it should be harvested.

    It doesn’t look like dying down yet. Here’s a pic:

    And another of the flower:

    Steve

    #339413
    Anja
    Member

    According to the warm earth article-

    “The foliage dies back in winter after flowering, at which time the tubers must be harvested carefully to avoid damage. Using a digging fork, gently loosen the soil under and around the tubers before carefully easing the entire root system from the ground……Once harvested, the tubers should be dried in the sun and stored in a cool dark place. They will continue sweetening for a week or two in storage.

    New plants will not grow from the tubers themselves – only the crowns at the base of the stems will produce new plants. Store the crowns indoors in moist peat moss until early spring. Then plant out the sections that have begun to form green buds.”

    (editted to correct typo’s :p

    #339414
    Bubba Louie
    Member

    I thought it was very bland but I suspect it was because I didn’t wait for the plant to die off.

    I don’t agree that only crowns grow. It took me forever to get rid of mine because every little bit of tuber grew back.

    #339415
    peter g
    Member

    Steve, they say the tubers can be harvested in Autumn. My permaculture book shows the lady bandicooting around in the yucon pulling out the tubers, she didn’t wait for the plant to die back. She said if you harvest earlier in the year the tubers won’t be as sweet.

    Jen

    #339416
    Steve
    Keymaster

    Thanks Annie & Jen,

    I forgot that Gardening Australia is featuring yacon tonight – they call it Peruvian ground apple.

    Here is tonight’s program:

    GARDENING AUSTRALIA HIGHLIGHTS

    Edible Landscaping

    Josh Byrne shows us some fantastic edible plants that can be easily incorporated into a small, existing garden. He explains how to grow low-chill blueberries, cape gooseberries, pepinos and Peruvian ground apples.

    Begonias

    Angus Stewart visits the Royal Botanic Gardens in Sydney to have a look at one of the world’s largest outdoor collection of begonias.

    Newstead House

    Colin Campbell takes a tour of the grounds of Brisbane’s Newstead House, which covers almost four hectares and features some of city’s most historic and unusual trees.

    Autumn Trees

    John Patrick gives some tips on the selection of trees that will bring brilliant autumn colour to your backyard.

    Tips & Tricks

    Jane Edmanson shows us how to correctly lift and store tender plants such as dahlias for winter.

    ABC1 Sat 6:30pm, Sun 1:00pm ABC2 Mon 4:00pm

    #339417
    meg53
    Member

    I knew you guys would have the answers.:clap: So I think I will leave them until they die down, to ensure they are sweet.

    I brought my from Daleys fruit tree nursery along with my fruit trees, just as an experiment.

    How does one prepare the tubers for eating?

    Thanks

    -Meg

    #339418
    paulaorganic
    Member

    I’ve never seen these before.

    I’m definetly going to give them a go in July when Green Harvest starts selling them again in July. :tup:

    It sounds like a very interesting flavour, cross between apple and watermelon with overtones of sugarcane. :tup:

    #339419
    jennifer g
    Member

    you can eat them raw, just peel and have with dips for the crisp carroty apple flavour…(not my experience just what i have read though) or they can be cooked like other starchy tubers.

    #339420
    jennifer g
    Member

    see this link for Yacon info from Green harvest.

    http://www.greenharvest.com.au/Plants/yacon_info.html

    Paula thanks for reminding me that they become available in July, I thought it was Sept but thats because they’re available from July- September.

    #339421
    meg53
    Member

    Thanks, must go to the green harvest site when I get a moment.

    Meg

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 24 total)
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.