Aussies Living Simply

Wombat?

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  • #245909
    Dobly
    Member

    Hi all

    We have a block of land that we are looking at building on (finally) in the new year (we hope). 🙂

    This is a bush block about 20 minutes north of Grafton.

    Anyway, we went out there today roughly on the site where we are going to put the house, there is a hole in the ground. This hole is about as round as a, well, a wombat.

    That’s my guess. What else could it be?

    Anyway.. When it comes time to build the house what should we do about the wombat? The house will be built on piers so it is possible that we might build the house over the wombat hole in such a way that he finds a nice new shelter over his home. Or, we could get him moved.

    What is recommended here? Are wombats dangerous? Destructive? As timid as they are cute? Could it burrow so much as to pose a threat to the stability of our house?

    Dobly

    #378180
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    get on to your local vte or RSPCA.. They will be able to give you some advice if not come and re-locate the little fella 🙂

    #378181
    Gianna
    Member

    Have you ever read any of Jackie French’s books? She knows all about wombats and had one living under her house. Noisy buggers. 😆

    #378182
    Kippen
    Member

    I recommend you call Queensland Parks & Wildlife. They’ll have the expertise to identify the hole and if you are faced with having to move one, you may need to talk to them anyway because wombats are a protected species. Phoning 1300 130 372 will get you to them (eventually <g> )

    Here’s an interesting site by a person who has lived with a wombat.

    http://www.wombat.echidna.id.au/wombat1.htm

    #378183
    geoaussie
    Member

    First and foremost in the Grafton area it is highly unlikely to be a wombat.

    What is recommended here? Are wombats dangerous?

    Wombats can be very dangerous if cornered, They can inflict nasty bites and have strong sharp claws.

    Destructive? The main damage done by wombats is burrowing under fences (solved by installing a wombat gate (doggy door in fence)) and the holes created by the burrows, solved by fencing burrows off from other stock.

    As timid as they are cute? They are a timid creature that will get out of your way rather than confront you. Will defend if cornered or if young are threatened. Usually ward danager off by display of screatching and growling.

    Could it burrow so much as to pose a threat to the stability of our house?

    It takes generations to build a large burrow. Burrows are rarely more than 1m below the ground so if in doubt drive a stake into the ground to check for a tunnel. To get rid of a wombat place a one way door at the entrance of the burrow (ie wombat can get out but not in) for about 5 days then block up the burrow. Wombats maintain between 4 to 10 tunnels at any one time so it will not be hurt by losing a burrow. Wombats can be kept out from under a house by burying mesh, sheet iron etc to a depth of approx 600mm and then enclosing the underside of the house with mesh, trellace, timber etc.

    Hope this helps

    For more information contact the Wombat Protection Society at

    http://www.wombatprotection.org.au/

    info@wombatprotection.org.au

    or myself

    #378184
    Dobly
    Member

    Thanks for this great response geoaussie

    geoaussie wrote:

    First and foremost in the Grafton area it is highly unlikely to be a wombat.

    This then begs the question, what could it be? I don’t have a photo of the hole but I will get one when next I am up there (about 20 minutes north of Grafton). The hole is about as round as a soccer ball, goes down just a little way then seems to level out. That is, I can’t see more than about half a meter into it and I’m sure not going to stick my arm in there.. 😮

    What else could make a hole like this?

    geoaussie wrote:

    It takes generations to build a large burrow. Burrows are rarely more than 1m below the ground so if in doubt drive a stake into the ground to check for a tunnel.

    Wouldn’t there be a risk of impaling the wombat if I did this? Plus there is no question there is a tunnel. I can see it. It sure does not look like a natural thing. That is, something dug it.

    Are there no wombat around Grafton?

    #378185
    Judi B
    Keymaster

    We have a hole dug at the side of our driveway it is about 20-25cm across goes down for about 30cm then goes under the drive pretty sure we don’t have wombats here but we have plenty of rabbits and hares this is what we think dug the hole.

    #378186
    Bubba Louie
    Member

    You might like to post this on Scribbly Gum, the ABC’s nature forum. I’m sure they’d have some useful advice.

    http://www2b.abc.net.au/science/scribblygum/

    #378187
    geoaussie
    Member

    This is a bush block about 20 minutes north of Grafton

    As you go further north wombats are confined to the highlands. Wombats are heat sensitive (ie they have trouble keeping cool and that is why they stay in burrows during the day) also it is my understanding that wombats were removed from the coastal plain by early settlers.

    Old burrows which have been passed down through generations of wombats can be up to 20m+ long with side passages and nesting chambers. If trying to locate tunnels I would suggest at night when the burrow should be empty. New burrows are rarely more than a few metres long.

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