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Who knew leek seeds were black?

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  • #255641
    silentC
    Member

    Not me, not until last night anyway. I got some leek seeds, along with eggplant and tomato, from Diggers and I planted some last night. So how do you know if a) you’ve spread them out enough and b) you haven’t uncovered them while smoothing out the seed raising mix on top?

    Again I didn’t really know what I was doing here. I got three shallow trays from the recycling centre (read “rubbish tip”), put half and half compost/coarse sand in each, scattered the three lots of seed in each and covered with about 6mm of seed raising mix. I wasn’t sure if I should try and spread the seeds in an orderly fashion, or just throw them about. Moot point with the leeks because I couldn’t see them anyway.

    I’ve left them outside on the verandah with a sheet of bubble wrap over the top. Bad idea? I read it was good to put a sheet of glass over them in winter until seedlings emerge. These are in full sun from late morning to early afternoon. Bad idea? Too hot?

    We’ll see what comes up in a couple of weeks I suppose. The waiting is the hardest part. But I’ve finally got snow peas and one very tiny broccoli, so that’s exciting.

    #507141
    busylizzie
    Member

    Me! I collect my own Leek seeds off the heads if they go to flower and seed, pretty much the same as Onions. The seeds can take a little while to come up,(as do Eggplant) heat is good, but make sure the pot mix doesnt dry out, I mist mine 1 to 2 times a day (in hothouse). Good luck, hope you have lots of success with your veg seeds. πŸ™‚

    #507142
    silentC
    Member

    I’ve checked them a couple of times today (like a father with a new baby) and they’re still nice and moist. My 12yo daughter is also on the case. Is it time to water them again Dad? Not yet, soon….

    Is it time yet?

    πŸ™‚

    #507143
    Bobbee
    Member

    :wave:

    Me too. :cheer:

    Keep ’em moist. I dunno about bubble wrap, we use plastic bags. My giant leeks were second up in my lot. The lettuce beat everything I have they come up really fast.

    Just a word on ‘checking’. Every time you lift the ‘lid’ you let heat out. :S

    My daughter told me to check the seeds in the mornings and then leave them alone so the heat stays in all night. :blush: Common sense really. Something I lack sometimes, in some areas only of course. πŸ˜›

    It is fun achieving seedlings, I always used to kill mine either from to much or to little water. πŸ™ I still get a thrill when they poke their little heads up. :clap:

    Good luck with yours,

    Bobbs :hug: :hug: :hug:

    #507144
    silentC
    Member

    Bobbee post=322346 wrote: Just a word on ‘checking’. Every time you lift the ‘lid’ you let heat out. :S

    Good point! We’ll check them each morning and water if needed, then they have time to warm up again during the day.

    The bubble wrap was the first thing I put my hand on when I was looking for something to put over them. I thought it would be good because it will keep in the moisture and the bubbles are an insulation which will keep in the heat. I was just worried about turning them into roasted nuts!

    By the way when I looked today there were hundreds of little bugs and things running around in there. Little transparent worms and all sorts of wildlife. Even a bug about 5mm long with babies crawling all over it’s back. I suppose they came in with the compost. Hope none of them eat leek seeds!

    #507145
    sue e
    Member

    I put mine in one of those elcheapo plastic crates with a lid.It is transluscent enpough to let in plenty of light but also to give a bit of a break from the hot sun. One if those slide under the bed type crates are good as they are large but deep enough for lots of punnets. I leave the lid slightly ajar if it looks like they are getting too hot and for a bit of air movement.

    #507146
    silentC
    Member

    OK I know the ones you mean. When I was looking around for something to use, I saw one but it was full of Lego, so I had to rule that out.

    The actual trays I used I got from the tip. I don’t know if they are meant to be seed trays, but they’re about the right size and have slots in the bottom.

    I’m looking around for some of those foam boxes that fruit comes in now to put the larger seedling pots in – using 2 litre milk cartons with the top and bottom off for the pots. Our local fruit shop didn’t have any when I went the other day. But a few of those flat crates might do the trick if I can’t find any.

    There’s a lot of stuff to gather when you first start out!

    #507147
    busylizzie
    Member

    Shhhh, dont tell anyone, (cos your not suppose to have them) but those bread trays are perfect for about 32 punnets to sit in :whistle: Ive built up quite a collection of stuff for seed raising, lots of stuff can be sourced from people throwing it away.

    Are you using straight compost from your heap?

    #507148
    sue e
    Member

    Also the little clear plastic containers that fruit and veges are sometimes packaged in are good to put over punnets as well!

    #507149
    silentC
    Member

    >Are you using straight compost from your heap?

    Yes, I sieved it first to get all the lumpy bits out. Haven’t quite got that art perfected yet. Hope it’s alright though. The critters seem to like it.

    #507150
    Snags
    Member

    Dad always had one of mums stockings over the seed head to collect the seeds when it dried he chopped it and hung the head still in the stocking from a nail on the rafters of the garage,so the mice didnt get it

    #507151
    ballamara
    Member

    my grandad always did that stockings are  very useful items

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