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What jam/jellying to do with "feral" plum juice?

Home Forums HOMEMADE Home Preserving, Food Storage and Stockpiling What jam/jellying to do with "feral" plum juice?

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  • #246483
    tarntarn
    Member

    Hi

    Plums are a bit of an environmental weed around here so I thought I’d pick a bunch to make some kind of preserves (and reduce the spread of them?:shy:). They are tart and small with large stones so i didn’t bother cutting the stones out & just simmered them with a bit of water & ran the slops through some cheese cloth like I do for crab apple jelly. I was under the mistaken impression that plums were high in pectin and could make a jelly…but Mr Google proved me wrong. So…any ideas on how I can make a clear jelly from this beautiful clear ruby coloured juice I’ve obtained? I don’t want to add commercial pectin so i thought I might try boiling up some granny smith apples with a bunch of spices (cinnamon, star anise etc) then straining again & boiling up with sugar (will have to look up how much i need per cup of juice) to make a spiced jelly glaze for meats like my spiced crab apple jelly I made last year. Does that sound reasonable? How many apples might I need? Or does anyone have a better idea?

    Thanking you in advance for your collective preserving wisdom!

    We’re taking our 18 month old toddler on his first camping trip tonight (and its raining now!) so it’ll be a couple of days before I can log back on to check replies but as i snuggle in my tent with little Sam and my hubby I’ll be dreaming jelly….

    Cheers all

    tarn

    #386049
    edensgateedensgate
    Member

    Lemon and lime skins are high in pectin. Could you boil the mixture again without affecting the flavours?

    Seems you’ve already disposed of the plum solids but next time you could also make wine from your tart plums but you would still need to add pectinase and a few other ingredients to make your wine successful.

    #386050
    GirlFridayGirlFriday
    Member

    ugh plums- i remember having two trees in the back yard when we lived in canberra and having plum jam. sauce. chutney….stewed plums. you name it! couldnt eat plums for years afterwards.

    i second boiling some lemon skin/ seeds with it .

    #386051
    BobbeeBobbee
    Member

    Hi tarn, wave

    I make my plum jam leaving the stones in the mix until it is ready to put in the jars. Then I just skim the stones out, it is quite easy to do this.

    If you still have the plum stones you could just put them back into the mix I guess or perhaps putting them into a little muslin or cloth bag first and then into the juice would work. I assume the pectin would come through the bag and into your jelly mix but I don’t actually know this.

    I have never used commercial pectin in my jam or jelly making. I assume your tart plums work for jam the same as ordinary plums. The only problem I have ever had with making plum jam is cooking it for too long and it went very, very solid, Could have cut it with a knife and fork so it was ruined. Always test early to be on the safe side and take it off the flame while you are testing.

    Good luck. Jam and jelly making is a very satisfying and rewarding experience.

    B) B)

    #386052
    JewelsJewels
    Member

    Most plum jam recipes have the juice of a lemon added to them! I have a recipe for making your own pectin hand written in an 1897 homemkers book!

    I have resisted using “Jamsetta” to assist in setting but pectin is a natural product usually derived from apples. I found a pkt. from the ’80’s I had stuck away & used it to make a batch of strawberry rhubarb jam, sure beat cooking the bejeebus out of it, especially since it was only a kilo of fruit.:tup:

    ~Jewels~

    #386053
    marigoldmarigold
    Member

    Far as I know, Jamsetta is pectin. People didn’t know what pectin was so they called it Jamsetta. Works for me.:)

    I once made yellow tomato jelly with heaps of lemon juice, but it would *not* set. (so I added some gelatine – Ssshh, don’t tell:lol: )

    It was great with pork, wish I could remember exactly what I did:|

    #386054
    JewelsJewels
    Member

    marigold, that’s the trouble with spur of the moment solutions, we tend to forget to write down what we did & we can’t reproduce them!:(

    Does sound lovely with the yellow tomatoes. Have to admit to making tomato sauce with yellow tomatoes once, just not the same, couldn’t convince people it was just tomato sauce!:tdown: Maybe just the basic tomato relish next time!;)

    Jamsetta does have a bit of sugar in the mix the pkt. says!

    ~Jewels~

    #386055
    tarntarn
    Member

    Well my dears, i did it. I made a beautiful spiced feral plum and granny smith apple clear jelly. I just used the strained feral plum “juice” which i’d stored in the fridge for a few days while we went camping, and boiled it up with a bunch of spices (ginger, star anise, cinnamon) and a chopped up whole lemon for good measure. i strained the lot again through cheesecloth and got about 5 cups of juice but it looked a bit thick & syrupy so i topped it up with about another couple of cups of water then boiled it up with an equal part of sugar until setting point and bottled it. It set delightfully and is a beautiful claret colour. i do wish I’d bottled it in smaller jars as the only ones i had to hand at the time were large (500mL mason jars) and they are too thick to really show off the gorgeous colour. (It was night-time and my little jars were out in the unlit shed with all the 8-legged freaks that live there). I also only got the large two jars out of it so its hard to share around with friends. Next season i might do the same again but use small baby food jars and pop in either a stick of cinnamon or a couple of stars of star anise to set in the jelly just for a lovely effect.

    Thanks for all your ideas and comments! You are such a great bunch of helpful friendly people!

    Cheers,

    tarn

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