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What is wrong with this Mandarin tree??

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  • #257747
    VanessaVanessa
    Member

    This tree was planted about a month ago, and isn’t looking too good.

    Anyone have any ideas as to what is wrong and how do I fix it?

    Photos to follow

    #532269
    VanessaVanessa
    Member

    Whole tree

    #532270
    VanessaVanessa
    Member

    #532271
    VanessaVanessa
    Member

    #532272
    VanessaVanessa
    Member

    #532273
    porgeyporgey
    Member

    Nutrient deficiency is one problem, Iron being one element short as noted by the yellowing leaves. Transplant shock could also be a factor, going from lovely potting mix to a different soil can shock some plants. pH is also worth considering.

    #532274
    SnagsSnags
    Member

    Tell us about your temps

    The type of soil its in

    and how wet or dry it is

    #532275
    mistyhollowsmistyhollows
    Member

    I have had similar things happen here. Today I did a ph test on an area where plants keep dying no matter what. In that particular area we have extremely acid soil – to the point that nothing grows there. It’s worth getting a kit and doing a ph test.

    Regardless of the soil I would add heaps of nutrient rich material and gypsum (if you have clay soil) and give it some love with seasol (weekly for a month or so, then monthly after that). Water it daily (but not too much). Even some specialised citrus fertilizer to slowly break down eg osmocote citrus food wont hurt as citrus are hungry hippos. I’d also give it a spray with eco oil incase it has a disease of some kind.

    Good luck.

    #532276
    VanessaVanessa
    Member

    Thanks for the replies.

    Since I took that photo most of the leaves have fallen off 🙁

    I got a ph test kit, and the soil is around 8-8.5, so I have now put sulphur around it and watered that in, I was going to give it some dynamic lifter which I have in the shed.

    I gave it some seasol before I took the photos, but will continue to do this on a regular basis.

    And I’ll hope for the best

    #532277
    SnagsSnags
    Member

    I know you lost your leaves but try foliar spray with seasol too

    Even the green bits on the stems should soak some in faster than the roots will

    Also try adding molasses to get your soil bacteria going so the sulphur becomes more effective

    Plenty of organic matter too.

    Dont disturb the roots though (Near the surface and hairy)

    #532278
    VanessaVanessa
    Member

    I was thinking of sprinkling gypsum around the base and watering that in (not disturbing the soil hear the root zone)to try to break up the clay soil we have.

    If I just sprinkle it around and water it in will it get down deep enough or will it just break to top little bit?

    #532279
    IdunaIduna
    Member

    Apply 1kg to 2kg of gypsum a square meter around the tree and water in some Iron sulphate until the sulphur starts braking down in 4 to 6 weeks. The gypsum will work if all you can do is water it in but if you can ruff it up some with a hand fork that would be better. Trace elements wouldn’t hurt.

    #532280
    BelBel
    Member

    Vanessa – I think your tree is drowning (or it may have a secondary fungal infection/virus. With our heavy clay soils, if you made a nice bowl shape before you put the tree in and then stuck the tree in, you may have made a little swimming pool for it. I have found (from killing many citrus trees here), that the only way to get them to going is to plant them in raised mounds because citrus need good drainage. If it’s not too late, I’d almost try gently digging it out and replanting it in a raised mound. It might not like this cold snap either, so a hessian or shade cloth swale around it will help to insulate it a bit too and will keep any frosts away later. I wouldn’t be fertilising it while it’s in shock – you may only make it worse.

    I second the suggestions to add gypsum. Lots of it. You may find this link useful:

    Citrus Soil Management

    #532281
    VanessaVanessa
    Member

    I had wondered if it was getting a bit to wet with the recent rains that we have had.

    I am thinking I might dig it out, it has only been in for a month or two, so the roots shouldn’t have spread that far, and planting it in a raised mound.

    Bel how have you created your raised mounds?

    #532282
    BelBel
    Member

    Vanessa post=355885 wrote: I had wondered if it was getting a bit to wet with the recent rains that we have had.

    I am thinking I might dig it out, it has only been in for a month or two, so the roots shouldn’t have spread that far, and planting it in a raised mound.

    Bel how have you created your raised mounds?

    I dig a big hole, then use the excavated soil to mix with gypsum and some good compost (or even buy something like mushroom compost), then make the mound out of that. When I planted quite a few fruit trees at once, I bought in a trailer load of loam+compost, but otherwise I try to use what I’ve got on hand. I make the mound quite big because it does compact down and erode quite a bit. My best mounds are probably close to 1.5-2m in diameter. I also stake citrus because they don’t like being blown about – they are very temperamental for the first couple of years so I do what I can to minimise any wind/cold/water-logging…

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