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What is the most effective economical way of heating separate rooms?

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Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 24 total)
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  • #256908
    gypsyoak
    Member

    Our house is kind of in 2 halves. The kitchen living area is open plan and is heated by a wood fire or gas heater in emergencies. (bottled gas) We then have a single doorway (with no door) that leads to the hallway and bedrooms. We were thinking of putting a door on it so we can shut it in the day when the bedrooms are not in use.

    Up until now, the kids have slept in our bedroom so we have just used a little electric heater to warm up the room when needed. Our house gets very very cold in autumn/winter – as in you can see your breath and can’t feel your nose. Our kids are getting their own bedroom across the hall from us and we need a way of heating it. Basically we have the entrance hall in the middle and on either side is a bedroom. What do you think is the best way to do it? A gas heater in the hallway to do that half of the house? Individual heaters (gas or electric) in each bedroom? We can’t afford ducted, but do you think that is better? We will eventually get ducts in from the wood fire area to the bedrooms, but there are plenty of times where we need something pretty quick – like when we get home from being out for the day or at night. We are making the rooms as energy efficient as we can, because currently they are floorboards with a huge space underneath as the house is raised. The bedrooms are on the cold side of the house anyway and our block is like an ice pocket that freezes over when its frosty. 😆 The bed can feel like ice when you get in and rather then your body heating it up – you end up with chattering teeth. So, I have decided I want better heating! But economical, because we can’t afford to run 2 electric heaters.

    #523813
    Vickie
    Member

    we live in southern vic, in a run down weather board ‘house’. The house was put here in the late 70’s- early 80’s. We think the whole building was moved here (on stumps). Before it was moved we assume our house may have been some kind of boarding house for camps or used by workers on farms.

    One end is our living area.. the other is our rooms, bath and laundry.

    We have one wood heater in the living area. In past winters I did use an oil heater to take the chill off in our girls rooms as they were babies. But now 3 & 5 the girls seem better at keeping their blankets on thier beds :whistle:

    We have also been slowly renovating,and now have a much better wood fire than we started with, we are also more organised collecting decent wood for the fire that burns all night. It was really hard with newborn babies in this house.

    anyway, that was a long and boring story 😛 .. i could have just said when we got a good wood fire that was big enough and worked properly our heating has been perfect :cheer:

    #523814
    gypsyoak
    Member

    Our wood fire is a really good one, but it is at the furthest point from where we need the heat to go. You can heat the area up enough to heat the front of the house, but then that usually means you need to strip off and feel like you are in a sauna if you are in the warm end of the house. After 11 years of living here, I have decided to bite the bullet and actually properly find an effective way of heating the house! My girls are 2 and 5…..they are terrible at keeping blankets on. dd1 gets really hot and usually strips off, then she is freezing and comes into bed. lol

    #523815
    Vickie
    Member

    I tried to convince DH when our second baby arrived to get a ‘nobo’ heater down the bedroom end.. but it didn’t happen. they are supposedto be the most economical for electric. we dont have gas here.

    As babies, my girls both had woolen mits and polar fleece sleeping bags in winter 😉 Now we have taken some more walls out of the hall the heat flows through better.. and its really only our end bedroom that suffers.. i think one day we will get a small wood heater down there.

    good luck with whatever you decide 🙂

    #523816
    crystal
    Member

    Hi guys!

    I understand your frustration totally. My house has a split system in the living area. Its totally open and has a vaulted roof, no ceiling and a million windows. So the ac warms up good. But the second you turn it off all the heat literally flys out the window!

    Then the main hall has 4 beds and a bath. With so many kids we had 2 oil heaters. One in my room with the baby twins and us. I was feeding and changing nappies in the middle of the night. One in the other twins room which was on v. Low. Id put it against the wall beween their room and the other boys room. Alos put the beds against that wall. The heater warmed the wall and the kids because the walls are brick! Byt our power bill was ASTRONOMICAL!

    But…. now ive got 8 people in 4 rooms so i am going to try havinng one heater in the hallway at night. Its probably not economical to ever heat our big houses. When its very cold we put one heater in the lounge and all sleep in there at night!

    #523817
    caddie
    Participant

    You say the house is raised, I assume on stumps?

    We had a house like that and we closed the underneath in,used fibro sheeting I think, this made a huge difference.

    Carpet on bedroom floor helps with insulation too.

    Electric blankets to warm beds before getting in, not to leave on all night if you are worried about safety.

    I also hung a curtain over an open doorway to keep the heat in the rooms we were using.

    Even a sheer curtain can help retain heat, heavier curtains are more effective though, combination of both is good.

    Good Luck

    #523818
    Wombat
    Member

    Insulating under the floor sounds like a good start to me…..

    We also found that changing our bedding helped, but then we don’t get as cold as you guys. Here is a link to the article on our site about it.

    http://www.underthechokotree.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=209:sleeping-warm-without-an-electric-blanket&catid=37:heating&Itemid=54

    precvious ideas make sense to me.

    I was also looking into making ethanol heaters out of drink cans, but probably not a good idea for kids rooms……

    As Caddies said…….Good luck!

    Nev

    #523819
    gypsyoak
    Member

    Thanks Vickie! 🙂

    #523820
    gypsyoak
    Member

    lol…and now I read the rest of the posts so thanks everyone else too!

    Yep, the house is on stumps. Well, I say stumps. They are stumpish. There are quite a few posts with bricks sitting on top of them that occasionally when the floor starts sagging unacceptably you have to go under the house to jam the bricks back in. :lol Its so bizzare one half of the house is a metre off the ground and eventually it ends up at ground level. Ahhh this house…..well it certainly has character. Its lucky I love it, I mean hate it, I mean love it. 🙂

    #523821
    Vickie
    Member

    Gypsyoak. LOL it really does sound much like our place.. one end of the house is on the ground the other is on stumps – and some on bricks etc.. and they do get out of place and DH taps them back in. :whistle:

    We have places in our floor boards where we can see through to the ground.. its in the grand plan to get the floor insulated underneath. .. we have floor boards in the whole house.. rugs in the girls rooms and lounge really helped.

    #523822
    gypsyoak
    Member

    Vickie post=342912 wrote: Gypsyoak. LOL it really does sound much like our place.. one end of the house is on the ground the other is on stumps – and some on bricks etc.. and they do get out of place and DH taps them back in. :whistle:

    We have places in our floor boards where we can see through to the ground.. its in the grand plan to get the floor insulated underneath. .. we have floor boards in the whole house.. rugs in the girls rooms and lounge really helped.

    lol same here! Some spots where the floorboards just don’t quite reach the wall or where something has eaten through it. Some spots the wall doesn’t even meet the floor…. Same grand plan, I was thinking about either carpeting the girls room or getting an enormous rug in the meantime. We are going to replace some plasterboard so we will make sure the walls are insulated too.

    #523823
    Gumnut
    Member

    Would something like this work? It looks like a fairly simple system. Do you have access to 2nd hand ducting and some vents? http://www.dualheating.com.au/air-transfer-kits.htm

    #523824
    gypsyoak
    Member

    Gumnut post=342926 wrote: Would something like this work? It looks like a fairly simple system. Do you have access to 2nd hand ducting and some vents? http://www.dualheating.com.au/air-transfer-kits.htm

    brilliant gumnut! perfect! That is what I am after.

    #523825
    Vickie
    Member

    Gumnut, OH WOW, that is such a simple idea .. it would probably save us putting another fire down the other end of our place also.

    #523826
    veginout
    Member

    Thanks for the ducting link, I’ve got a cold 1/2 house problem also.

    A few of the cheap solutions to help with heating I’ve put in are: covering wall vents by 90% (used heavy duty wall paper); putting in kitchen carpet (cheap end of roll about $200 all up) on all bare/linoleum floors (works great in bathroom); sticking bubblewrap over large windows + thermal backed curtains (op shop); puting up homemade pelmets and adding extra carpet off cuts as mats in bedrooms.

    My daughter gets cold induced asthma, so I have an oil column heater in her room all winter (added about $300 pa to power bill before I went solar).

    The ducting looks great – waiting for a quote.

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