Skip to toolbar

Aussies Living Simply

Using cow poo

Viewing 12 posts - 1 through 12 (of 12 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #257883

    Hello everyone, has anyone used fresh cow manure mixed with water applied to vegetables and crop, if so what ratio would you use?

    My dear husband wants to use it on this years garlic crop and I am not very happy about it, maybe if its diluted enough there will be no ill effect? I just know that you can’t use freshly dug in manure to plant stuff….

    Would appreciate any helpful comments, thank you

    Happy gardening!!

    #533637
    BodkinsBodkins
    Member

    I always thought you couldn’t put fresh manure on plants, but just the other day I read something that suggested that this doesn’t apply to cow poo. Not sure where it was now, (might have been an old organic gardener magazine??).. I’ll have a look around and see if I can find it again.

    #533638

    Hey Bodkins, thanks for your answer,yes I was under the same impression, because its too strong, could burn plants! so if you can find out more it will be very much appreciated, maybe we could dilute it 1:100 and try out on a couple of garlic plants to see what happens, we have planted around 30 000 so its important to do the “right thing”, so far we used seasol and powerfeed commercial

    #533639
    BodkinsBodkins
    Member

    No vampires at your place, eh? :-)= I’ve found the reference — it’s in The Little Vege Patch Co book, by Fabian Capomolla and Mat Pember, p9-10. The pros and cons of the manure types are discussed, and it mentions burning for chook and horse poo, but for cow manure it says: “A source of good bacteria for your soil, cow manure can be added without fear of burning your plants.” I’ve never come across this before, so I’d be keen to hear if anyone has actually tried it. We have cow poo, err, on tap 🙂 but I’ve never used it fresh next to plants. Might be wise to try it on a few sacrificial plants first…

    #533640

    Thanks for that, we decided that we will give it a trial on just a few plant, will let you know the outcome!

    …and…NO, no vampires and no flu, we eat garlic thinly slices on vegemite toast every morning!

    #533641
    GirlFridayGirlFriday
    Member

    I make cow poo ‘tea’ but leave it to brew for two weeks and then water it down till its the colour of tea in the watering can. Cow poo doesnt burn like chook poo does. i have seen it have good effect on my plants and will keep using it.

    #533642

    thank you GirlFriday!

    can you tell me approx how much poo to how much water you make the brew, then whats the ratio for your “tea” please?

    we have at the moment 6 x 200 lt drums with about 1/4 cow manure and rest water, brewing away…

    #533643
    SnagsSnags
    Member

    Ive got a 4 tonne pile of cow poo sitting under plastic for a year waiting to be used.

    Weak tea and lots of it is the general rule

    But cow poo is more of a soil conditioner than a fertiliser

    http://www.abc.net.au/gardening/stories/s984417.htm

    #533644
    BronBron
    Member

    what is soil conditioner?? as in, what does it do to the soil?

    #533645
    SnagsSnags
    Member

    adds bacteria and organic mater, holds moisture.

    Though I imagine Poo from a cattle yard that hasnt been rained on would be fertiliser from the urine.

    #533646
    BronBron
    Member

    thanks 🙂 that makes sense

    #533647
    GirlFridayGirlFriday
    Member

    I have 4 20L buckets and put one ‘plop’ per bucket and add water. You can also add seaweed, comfrey, weeds etc etc to make a ripper of a brew.

Viewing 12 posts - 1 through 12 (of 12 total)
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.