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To Compost or Not To Compost – Mulberry Tree Waste

Home Forums FOOD PRODUCTION, HARVEST AND STORAGE Homemade fertilisers, sprays and compost To Compost or Not To Compost – Mulberry Tree Waste

Viewing 7 posts - 1 through 7 (of 7 total)
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  • #254261
    TimCTimC
    Member

    Hope I am posting this in the right spot…

    I have a giant mulberry tree which has just finished fruiting. I will be heavily pruning it back this year because it is getting too big for the backyard.

    I have also just built a 2.4 x 2.4m x 30cm raised garden bed which needs a lot of soil to fill. Rather than buy in soil I wanted to make my own compost and a lot of it. Could anyone point me to some good threads here on composting…

    So, back to the Mulberry tree. If I hired a mulcher, would the leaves and branch material be ok to compost? Keeping in mind the soil is for food growing. Google searches have given back mixed results on the suitability of mulberry for this purpose. Some say it is allelopathic, some mention the leaves containing cyanide… etc. It made me wonder because NOTHING will grow under the tree, except a bit of grass, No weeds, nothing.

    What does everybody think?

    #488348
    GothmotherGothmother
    Member

    i’d compost it.

    #488349
    GrumpyGertGrumpyGert
    Member

    I’d line the bottom of the bed with it then better mulch (maybe hay or weeds) and compost over it, everything else should leech downwards and be quite benign by the time roots get there. The only thing I’ve ever had problems with for killing other plants are wormwood and mugwort.

    #488350
    edensgateedensgate
    Member

    I would compost separately, not in the bed as it will surely become a nitrogen thief for a good while to come. Or use to mulch an under-tree zone as a weed-barrier.

    #488351
    roborthudsonroborthudson
    Member

    It doesn’t affect anymore if you composted it with cattle waste, wasted food, other tree leaves and water to compost it well and mixing. But it’s a lengthy process. Otherwise you have a choice to buy coco-peat – It’s an organic soil derived from coconut husks for green and healthy plant growth. It nourishes plants and vegetables well with the required ingredients.

    #488352
    SnagsSnags
    Member

    I would chop and drop

    #488353
    GirlFridayGirlFriday
    Member

    I would chuck it in the bottom of the garden and put other stuff over the top. Its all compostable after all.

Viewing 7 posts - 1 through 7 (of 7 total)
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