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Ted Trainer's Simpler Way

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  • #246091
    WombatWombat
    Member

    http://ssis.arts.unsw.edu.au/tsw/

    Hey Gang, there is some good stuff here that resonated with me and I’m sure will work for a lot of people here.

    We went to Ted’s property in East Hills years ago to listen to him speak, a wonderful experience.

    Nev

    #380816
    GeoffGeoff
    Keymaster

    Thanks Nev! Mr Trainer’s Garnaut report analysis has just been released and comes to some quite daunting conclusions, basically it’s not energetically feasible to achieve the carbon reductions they’re specifying.

    http://ssis.arts.unsw.edu.au/tsw/GarnautFinal.html

    Even though Garnaut actually briefly discusses the problem of resource limits (p. 69 and Table 3.3), he defers to the dominant ideology regarding the limits theme. He says there is no point considering any option to the greenhouse problem which threatens significant slowing of growth, let alone which involves a transition to much lower levels of production and consumption. He says, “It is neither desirable, nor remotely feasible, to seek to lower the climate change risk by substantially slowing the rise in living standards anywhere, least of all in developing countries. If such an approach were thought to be desirable in some expression of distant and idiosyncratic values, neither Australians, nor people in the developing countries, would accept it.

    For several decades some of us have been arguing that the only way out of the global predicament is by huge and radical transition to some form of Simpler Way, in which the core elements are non-affluent lifestyles, mostly small local economies under participatory social control and not driven by market forces or profit, and without any growth at all. (See The Simpler Way website, Trainer 2006.) Such a society would not be possible without equally radical change away from the competitive, acquisitive value syndrome that has driven Western culture for several hundred years.

    #380817
    AndreAndre
    Keymaster

    Thanx Nev.

    I’ve seen some of Ted’s work previously (read: fleetingly scanned).

    But, when I was doing my PDC, I visited his website which detailed his property in southern suburbs of Sydney. What a fascinating place! :tup: And a very simple yet wonderful lifestyle that man has achieved :clap:

    #380818
    CrofterCrofter
    Member

    Ted walks his talk – no car – very simple lifestyle and lives close to the earth – I doubt if even 1% of the population would consider emulating him unless forced to do so by circumstance.

    #380819
    BobbeeBobbee
    Member

    Thanks Nev. There’s an awful lot to read there. I’m enjoying the bit I’m reading now about his lifestyle.

    :metal:

    #380820
    gleanertgleanert
    Member

    Reading Ted Trainer’s essay on “why ANZAC day is so disturbing”

    There is no possibility of solving the alarming range of global problems accelerating all around us unless we recognise the need to move to ways that involve far less production, consumption, and resource use. This cannot be done without radical system change. Anzac Day seems to demonstrate conclusively that we are totally incapable of thinking in these terms. It reveals an incapacity to think beyond the immediate experience of war, when the wheel comes off.

    :clap: Great and insightful reading.

    To be an environmentalist means you gotta be a pacifist!

    Thanks Wombat

    #380821
    trandtotrandto
    Member

    The guys got none to little chance of converting most people. I am sure it resonates with many members here as you’re on a similar wavelength. But go out into the wider World and speak with joe q public, or try and engage them, they will look at you as though you’re either insane or a hippy.

    I guess I adopted a different approach. Worked by butt off for 20 years, distance education, remote mine sites to get capital to start my own business worked hard and sold that and managed to retire at 40 to a “simpler” life one I worked towards.

    Unlike Ted I like to travel, Ted doesn’t know if he likes to travel, locally and overseas, as he never does. I like to go camping or visit remote areas, I loved being in the middle of the Simpson desert, the country is stunning and soul caressing. I like to engage with people of other cultures, to understand (but not necessarily agree with) their point of view. Ted doesn’t seem to engage with anyone except like minded people, I can totally understand the appeal of that but the realist in me recognises that approach is fundamentally flawed if a change to the cultural zeitgeist is something you are seeking. So my question (to myself mostly) is, surely he is content because he knows nothing else ? Philosophically that is not a bad thing per se, but for example, he only knows rainwater tastes so good because he tried it. I have always been engaged with the environment because I spent so much time in it, in my early years as as a Surveyor I lived and worked in the bush, grew up in a tiny town, then moved to the rural fringes of a larger town, chooks, ducks, veggies etc and spend my recreation time hiking, camping, mountain bike riding and ocean kayaking. He lives and works in Sydney !

    All of that aside, he has many interesting and valid points, albeit I must admit to being sceptical of academics, as their exposure to the real world can often be cloistered but then I am a cynic by nature 🙂

    Hopefully the contract I put in for 45Acres, off grid for water power, with gardens, chooks, mini orchard etc will see me more enaged 🙂

    #380822
    GeoffGeoff
    Keymaster

    Ted doesn’t seem to engage with anyone except like minded people, I can totally understand the appeal of that but the realist in me recognises that approach is fundamentally flawed if a change to the cultural zeitgeist is something you are seeking. So my question (to myself mostly) is, surely he is content because he knows nothing else ?

    It’s only in the last few decades during our oily age of exuberance that the majority of us have had the opportunity to travel anywhere. As affordability of oil products goes into decline we will once again have to do without travel to the current degree.

    I often wonder if those who have travelled widely have ever met a group of human beings who weren’t driven by the fundamental human desires? If not, then most of the cultural differences are largely superficial, and any isolated group of humans can be taken to represent a microcosm of the larger human universe. All of the successes and failings of humanity can be found within the humans residing in Sydney just as well as they can be found in those residing in isolated villages in South American jungles or the cosmopolitan cities like London.

    As changing “cultural zeitgeist” can only be carried out in a local sphere of influence, within the context of the local culture, habits and mores, I’d have to wonder about the need to go elsewhere to enact such change? And I wonder whether all the travellers aren’t polluting the other cultures they travel to see, to the extent that humanity is now headed toward cultural homogeneity?

    #380823
    julientuaregjulientuareg
    Member

    I think that I have read most of the articles on Ted Trainers website, (although the connections to some seem to have disappeared). I enjoy reading them and would hope that this is the type of society that results from the coming fossil fuel shortage. It would be nice to think that we would all be so civilised and community orientated but I have a feeling that there will be a rather nasty period while we all adjust.

    #380824
    trandtotrandto
    Member

    Wombat wrote:

    http://ssis.arts.unsw.edu.au/tsw/

    Hey Gang, there is some good stuff here that resonated with me and I’m sure will work for a lot of people here.

    Okay, what happened to that link ? It was there the other day ? I was going to pass it to some who was interested.

    #380825
    ZeitgeistZeitgeist
    Member

    Probably not what your after trandto, but you could look here http://candobetter.org/blog/97

    Ted Trainer must have read my mind with regards to the george w story

    And damn that avatar is annoying, but nothing that resizing the page won’t fix.:tup:

    #380826
    SonyaSonya
    Member

    Thanks for the post and link Nev, I’ll have a look at his work. He sent me a draft article with some constructive critisism of Transition Towns, which I greatly appreciated and we too and fro’d a little.

    I believe the final article on that ended up on the TT culture site (Rob Hopkins blog)

    Cheers,

    Sonya

    #380827
    BullseyeBullseye
    Member

    trandto wrote:

    Okay, what happened to that link ? It was there the other day ? I was going to pass it to some who was interested.

    He’s not listed on the UNSW staff pages now, so has probably moved on, with IT deleting the info…?

    Here’s an article in The Age by Ted Trainer.

    <a href="http://www.theage.com.au/articles/2007/04/06/1175366470599.html?page=fullpage“>We can’t go on living like this

    At the end it says, “Ted Trainer is a visiting fellow in the faculty of arts, University of NSW.”

    #380828
    WombatWombat
    Member

    Bugger!

    #380829
    deeedeee
    Member

    That would be part on UNSW’s latest round of staff cuts – set to gut good portions of the Science Faculty, too.

    D

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