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Aussies Living Simply

Tasmanian relocation

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 46 total)
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  • #255453
    roadwarriorroadwarrior
    Member

    I’ve always (half) joked with the wife that we should move to Tasmania to survive the end of the oil age, however our personal life has had a few changes lately that may mean we actually do relocate there.

    I’m asking those with experience, where would be the best location/town based on sustainability in a low tech society? Are there already peak oil/transition town movements, and if so, are they ripe to be plundered by the first bikey gang that rolls through town, or the first bushfire that comes their way?

    rw

    #502682
    mauzimauzi
    Member

    Hi,

    Looks like things are changing for you. They did for us as well and I am very happy that they did.

    We moved to Tasmania one and a half years ago and I think it was the best move we have made. We researched this for many years before the move and had visited a number of times as well for some hands on experience. We now live in the Huon Valley and to answer your questions as best I can. In my opinion Tasmania is a good option for a post oil society for a number of reasons –

    .Tasmania has a natural mentality of grow and support locally as well as a natural tendency not to travel distances (probably a good thing in view of the future).

    .Distances between towns are viable for low tech forms of transport (some of the hills might be questionable though :laugh: depending on areas

    .Transition towns are in operation or in preparation – Woodbridge, Cygnet, Geeveston and probably more that I don’t know about – think some in the north as well.

    .Some areas have good rainfall and low summer heats so are less prone to bushfire dangers – of course this also depends on individual location. Dry areas more towards the midlands and some areas of the east coast (pm me if you want more specific details).

    .The sheer populations size lends itself to a safer option than many parts of the mainland. There are some areas that I would not recommend but also prefer to talk about this in a pm.

    In terms of general areas obviously our preference was the Huon due to good soil, rainfall, like minded people and it is drawing a lot of people looking for a more sustainable lifestyle and future.

    I wish you luck with your decision and am happy to give more specifics (or at least my opinions and experiences) in a pm.

    Cheers

    Mauzi

    #502683
    RobyneRobyne
    Member

    Half your luck RW you won’t regret moving there. We moved there in 1988 and stayed 2 years I love the place but Hubby found it hard to adjust and son1 just wouldn’t give it ago.

    Sons2-3 loved it and the school they went to. Sheffield high school is great for kids.

    we lived in a little place called Erriba the folks were wonderful included us in as much as they could. It was half the size it is today. Work wasnt bountiful even for people with trades back then, you were a Mainlander and that was it. I found work picking vegetables, within a couple of weeks of being there.

    times have changed and the son1 who fought it all the way is willing to try again and hopefully we will be back in the next 12 months. We are looking at around Cygnet area. Have seen several places we liked.

    Son2 did put in an offer on a village in the north of Hobart but was out bidded would of suited everyone.

    Schools and doctors are the main thing to look for in the area you like. You still need to work if your not on a pension or have the money to live off of. I found when I was down there in May work picking fruit is still the best for topping up income.

    #502684
    NeataNeata
    Member

    I was born in Tassie and spent a great deal of my childhood in Franklin, just south of huonville in the huon valley. My granmother was a teacher at huonville primary and she use to grow everything! fruit trees of every description, nut trees and veggie garden that covered 1000m2. She made her own soap and preserves and traded the excess. They had a north facing block up on the hill.

    i’ve lived in 3 differnt states and 10 different houses since then, but this will always be home.. i keep planning to take my husband there on hoilday but i know i’ll never want to leave. :blush:

    Even though i haven’t been there for 20 years i would highly recommend the huon valley! :tup:

    #502685
    sue esue e
    Member

    We’re hoping to relocate there next year if all goes to plan.There are a number of reasons- climate, population pressures to name a couple,but we really think that if we do it now and have a bit of land with a bit of self sufficiency happening in a like minded community, there will always be somewhere for our kids to come when the you know what hits the fan.We have friends who moved to the Tamar Valley a few years ago so it would be nice to end up there but I think the Huon Valley will be our destination as well for all the reasons Mauzi mentioned.I would be interested to hear of the places you wouldn’t recommned Mauzi.

    #502686
    roadwarriorroadwarrior
    Member

    I’ve received a lot of PM’s as well, and virtually everyone is saying the same thing; the Huon Valley. My only concerns would be doctors, hospitals, schools and employment, though it’s not that far from Hobart. I would consider a town with a population between 5-10,000 a good size to survive in after peak oil. The Huon Valley looks a little too spread out for my liking.

    Peak-oil wise, it looks almost perfect though. Living there and making enough money to support a moderately sized family, while keeping everyone healthy and educated might be an issue. If it were just me I’d be there in a flash. Looks like there’d be good hunting in some of those hills too, and lots of river-side houses for fishing.

    At the moment it’s only a dream, but it’s better to plan for it just in case.

    Keep the suggestions coming…everyone has had good advice and I’m taking it all in. In fact I’m jealous I’m not there already.

    rw

    #502687
    SteveSteve
    Keymaster
    #502688
    mauzimauzi
    Member

    Hi again,

    I guess it is all a matter of perspective. Where we came from we were 45 kms to the nearest small town so here we see everything as so so close. Some of my comments may assist you with some of your concerns.

    Medically speaking, in our last place, it would take us a week to get into a Dr. (at all unless it was a medical emergency and had been known to wait for up to three weeks to see the Dr. of your choice) whereas we can now get in the same day or within a day or two at our local medical practice and of course the ability for specialist care is very close as well. For instance I had a hospital appointment today at Hobart Royal, took us 50 minutes to drive in (so as close as our local shops in our last place) and the staff were amazingly kind and efficient. I have been having a battle with a recurrent skin cancer and when it reoccurred after already having some 8 operations in NSW, I was booked into the Hobart Royal within three weeks and operated on, it still was not clear so re-operated on again within 3 weeks – pretty impressive I think. I got the all clear today so I am pretty happy with that.

    We also bought my father down here almost a year ago now when he was diagnosed with terminal cancer. He was only here a week when he needed to go into hospital in Hobart. The care he received was absolutely amazing and far better than he had received in other hospitals. He had a team of Drs. and specialists working with him and talking to us, quite unbelievable. The palative care he was offered was also outstanding and I was quite overwhelmed with the support. It was a gentle and caring way for him to complete his time on earth and the staff were exceptional with us as well. I could not speak more highly of my two experiences with the Hospital nor my experiences with our local GP.

    Education wise, there is a great deal of choice of schools. I do not now have children of school age, but again, where we came from there was very little choice locally and private schools were over 2 hours by bus each way, whereas there are multiple choices here and in far closer proximity. Work wise,I can only go on our experiences and I guess it would depend on skills and experience but everyone was saying my son would find it difficult to get work. He had three jobs within a week and had to choose between them,and he was not particularly skilled so it depends on what type of work you are willing. There is usually loads of work available at the fish farms and being so close to a capital city, not to mention other bigger areas like Kingston, there are lots of choices. My D/H also had no difficulty in getting part time work (which was all he wanted) and neither did I so I guess that will come down to the individual again. My son has since returned to Tafe to do an amazing course in eco and adventure tourism, picked up part time work in Hobart and has already done interviews for two other jobs for when he completes his training. Think that is pretty impressive as well.

    We do most of our shopping in Huonville and Geeveston, one 5 minutes drive the other 15, we do grow most of our own food, raise animals etc. but the choice for local and organic food is quite amazing and it is a really strong point for me in the area.

    Fishing is good too by the way. Mmmmmm.

    Gee I should apply for a job in tourism ha! ha!

    Cheers

    Mauzi

    Anyway, hope that helps with some of your thoughts and concerns.

    #502689
    Hummer HumbugHummer
    Keymaster

    mauzi post=319260 wrote:

    Fishing is good too by the way. Mmmmmm.

    Gee I should apply for a job in tourism ha! ha!

    Yeah I think you should Mauzi.. I want to go live in Tassie now :whistle:

    #502690
    roadwarriorroadwarrior
    Member

    Looking at some of the available properties for sale in Geeveston now. Gee…they really like their fake wood panelling down that way don’t they? Must have been all the rage in the 70’s :sick:

    I’m yet to find any of those award-winning, energy efficient sustainable homes you hear so much about. Just weatherboard iceboxes with purple bedrooms and lace. :sick: :laugh:

    #502691
    Hummer HumbugHummer
    Keymaster

    By the time you are ready to float over the Tasman, you will find the right place RW. Incidently, how will your firearms get over there.. will you have any drama’s in that regard ?

    .. by the way… I think lace and purple go quite nicely together too 🙂

    #502692
    mistyhollowsmistyhollows
    Member

    I love Tassie, would be there tomorrow if I could only get DH’s company to put in an office down there. Huon Valley is wonderful but I think DH found the Cadbury’s factory the best part :laugh: . Nothing like a river of chocolate 😛 Ross was one of my favourite towns but nothing beats the wilderness of the West Coast. I can’t imagine there would be a whole lot of jobs in the west other than fishing though. Petrol prices were through the roof there too.

    #502693
    bluezbanditbluezbandit
    Member

    West coast, jobs are fishing, mining, tourism, not much good for growing stuff as the season isn’t very long in summer. I lived there for 6 years in the 70s. It certainly is wildly beautiful.

    Tamar valley, Cole river valley, Mersey valley and Derwent valley are all magnificent farming areas. So the Huon Valley isn’t the only one.

    Deb

    #502694
    roadwarriorroadwarrior
    Member

    For employment I’d probably be more inclined to head towards the mining sector. With the price of gold the way it is, I wouldn’t be surprised if some of the old mines in the west start re-opening. But that area is not sustainable at all…its too isolated.

    The Huon area looks almost perfect. It would just depend on where a rough nut like me could find a job.

    #502695
    roadwarriorroadwarrior
    Member

    Humbug post=319278 wrote: Incidently, how will your firearms get over there.. will you have any drama’s in that regard ?

    I could drive them there myself, or use a courier company. While I have a NSW firearms licence it is honoured in other states just like a drivers licence.

    However if I wanted to hunt deer in tassie I’d like to adhere to state law. In NSW you need a game council licence to hunt deer legally.

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