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Survival weapon for hunting.

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  • #428602
    JanineJanine
    Member

    I’d be interested in doing some survival courses, does anyone know of any courses in the Melbourne area? I have been looking up indigenous weapons and there are special hunting boomerangs that do not come back, some are most reasonably priced considering they are hand made traditionally by aboriginal families.

    #428603
    MetuMetu
    Member

    Sorry if I seem argumentative Dennis – it’s a good thread. :tup: I just got caught on another tangent. 😆

    #428604
    grumpy3grumpy3
    Member

    Metu. Not a problem hope you can get some info out of it, We will have to call in one day and say hi and see how you are getting on with your place. Thats if you don’t mind.

    Take care

    Dennis

    #428605
    MetuMetu
    Member

    Wouldn’t mind at all. Everyone’s welcome for a cuppa at our place. Especially if they’re on a trip and need a break. 🙂

    I have gotten a lot out of this thread too. Would you believe my mum was a farm girl and learned how to use all the things we’re talking about in this thread? She can wring a rabbits neck, use traps, a knife, etc.

    When she moved to the city though, all that got exchanged for raising a family. I’ve often heard stories about what she used to do as a kid on the farm, and reading this thread, it makes me realise that there was a time people needed to do this. And possibly again in the future?

    #428606
    chookenchooken
    Member

    The bush will very quickly get denuded of free wildlife. Ultimately hunters will end up poaching on communities anyway. That might be survival, but it’s not going to last very long, because communities will shore themselves up and get stronger and fight back. Lone survivalists will die out in a generation or so (with the help of interpersonal feuds over who hunts where).

    The best survival tool is a bunch of friends who will protect your back, be there to nurture children, process the food and provide security and strength in numbers so you can grow or gather what you need.

    Communities have won over small marauding bands every time.

    Yay community!

    #428607
    grumpy3grumpy3
    Member

    Chooken. You may find the largest part of the population will stay in the cities ” not sure thats a good idea” but it may help the likes of us. The powers that be may also try and make all natural parks etc off limits but a lot of us can’t read very well.

    I believe the whole idea is to gain the skills and then if need be we wont be up a creek in a barbed wire conoe. I would like things to be healthy and happy but I am not taking everything for granted.

    Dennis

    #428608
    BushpigsBushpigs
    Member

    What an interesting thread.

    Thought I was the only one thinking along the lines of survival if the worst came to the worst. I might add I have been seriously thinking of this since the 1980’s.

    In the late 1980’s I had the opportunity to put into practise my survival plan.

    I can tell you right now it is no piece of cake and the only saving grace in my case was I knew “it was not forever”.

    I conducted this experiment in western Qld as that is where I was working at the time.

    If things came down to survival you would need to go far away or you would run into terrible trouble with frightened starving people. I agree with GRUMPY3, most people will stay close to the cities.

    You had better know your country eg. permanent water for a start.

    Your biggest worry is getting enough greens otherwise you get Barcoo Rot which is just like scurvy.

    Forget the fishing lines and hooks. Just put in nets.

    I had a hunting dog which could bring down a roo – very handy.

    A yabbie trap made from netting worked well and yabbies loved emu meat.

    The plains turkey was good eating, a bit tough.

    Just remember, if you have a water hole, you have all sorts of birds and other wildlife.

    What people tend to forget is the availability of stock such as sheep and cattle.

    As for rifles. Many people my age, as soon as the daft weapons act came into being we hoared up to 2,000 rounds of ammunition. I have done this with .22 as I agree with the statements here re it is light to carry and does the job.

    Although I don’t like snares or traps and did not use them at the time, they have their uses and I would use them.

    The only animals I would take are goats and good hunting dogs.

    On a closing note – my rifle is my freedom. Not only can I protect myself but more importantly I can keep myself alive.

    #428609
    NimrodelNimrodel
    Member

    I believe the whole idea is to gain the skills and then if need be we wont be up a creek in a barbed wire conoe. I would like things to be healthy and happy but I am not taking everything for granted.

    Sums it up for me perfectly. I like the idea of building community, having a group of like minded neighbours, family, friends that can band together and help each other out but I always go by the motto ‘prepare for the worst, hope for the best’.

    Maybe we wont ever NEED the skills to feed ourselves off what we can hunt but I would hate to be without those skills if one day it turns out I do need them!

    #428610
    shortlyshortly
    Member

    dont forget if things get realy pear shaped fish used to be taken by the traditional owners with “fish poisons” like rotenone and barringtonia. actually they bind up O2 suffocating the fish rather than being a poision as such.

    The down side is that it needs to be a confined pool (not flowing) & it would kill all the fish in it.

    Fish can be gutted & dried, salted or pickled for months if need be.

    mmmmmmm desert goby anchovets:)

    #428611
    PinetreePinetree
    Member

    I would not like to be an animal in the bush post PO, it would be like being a chip in a mob of sea gulls. 😐

    I suspect that it is going to get crowded in the bush. Generally bush is not productive to the European eye, to live off the land a nomadic or seasonal life style would be required, to rest the land (and let the animals breed).

    In the short term going bush may be a survival option, but using an effort to food return ratio, I think that a vegy patch and a few chooks or what ever animal you can breed and fatten would be a safer option.

    I don’t like to think what 20 000 000 consumers are going to do.:noapprove:

    See you on the barricade Pinetree:tup:

    #428612
    grumpy3grumpy3
    Member

    It maybe that 19 999 000 will be in the city “with any luck” and the other 1 000 “us ” will be in the bush. That way the gov can supply the needs of those in the cities ” poison food and water and lethal injections ” , just to keep them all happy.

    I will stay with the idea of going bush.

    Dennis

    #428613
    roadwarriorroadwarrior
    Member

    Jees grumpy, and I thought I was a doomer. That’s positively depressing.

    Being holistic about this, I think one of the best weapons you can have is a group of family or friends that you know you can trust in a crisis situation.

    Being realistic, you need a gun with a stockpile of ammo. One of the best survival weapons is a simple .22 calibre rifle. Ammo is really cheap and easily available for stockpiling. The hardest thing is getting a firearms licence. Took me years to get all the requirements in place. At a distance, most people wouldn’t be able to tell if you had a high powered rifle or a pea-shooter slung over your shoulder, and nobody is going to risk attacking you…they’ll go for soft targets like the people with woomeras and boomerangs.

    If you want to hunt deer, pigs or goats you’ll need something bigger, like a .223 or .308. Ammo is a lot more expensive but you literally get more bang for your buck.

    I understand that firearms aren’t sustainable in a long emergency, but a good gun with a suitcase full of ammo could last a lifetime. Just having a rifle, even if it isn’t loaded, will prevent you from becoming a target to the hungry horde.

    I also understand that the majority of people on here are horrified by guns. I don’t blame them. But I’m more horrified by the behavior of humans.

    At the end of the day you want to have the ability to feed AND protect yourself and your family.

    rw

    #428614
    stangstang
    Member

    I think there is one sure thing in this world, and that is that humans will never run out of guns and ammo.

    #428615
    grumpy3grumpy3
    Member

    RW. I thought I was being positive 😆 But yea your right about the 22 etc. I was more thinking that multi skill as far as hunting and survival would be a good advantage. In the past I have spent many years in pistol, black powder and rifle clubs. I have hunted with black powder along side my mate who was a bow hunter and we got on good. I have used hand guns for hunting as well but would prefer a 22 for a survival weapon. 308 or 270 are not the best for shooting pidgeons lol.

    Survival opens up a whole range of ideas that can be used so its not just a gun we need but ideas on living off the land. These may and will mean collecting eatable weeds and maybe growing something.

    What was the figure they said for the Australian population, Something about 5 or 6 million I think. The rest would just have to dig a hole and bury themselves. But make sure you plant a tree over yourself first.

    Dennis

    #428616
    roadwarriorroadwarrior
    Member

    Dennis: The figure was one million. If we had to rely without modern technology or agriculture, the australian mainland would only be able to support one million people.

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