Skip to toolbar

Aussies Living Simply

strawberry plants are getting old – transplant needed?

Home Forums FOOD PRODUCTION, HARVEST AND STORAGE Fruit, Vines, Nuts and Sprouts strawberry plants are getting old – transplant needed?

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 15 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #236841
    sabinesabine
    Member

    i’ve read about transplanting the runners of strawberries to keep the viruses of your main bed in check – but i would’ve thought that the runners also would be infected. but buying new plants every few years isn’t sustainable… this is my first time to have strawberry plants and they are looking in need of freshening up so i’m going to transplant next week. is this neccesary? what do other people do?

    peace,

    sabine

    #261059
    bushybushy
    Member

    I’m no expert on stawbs, but always had good success. Every year I’d start a new patch by transplanting, using the FIRST plant on the runner (called a sister plant), if you use the others it will take 1 or 2 seasons to produce well. Can keep old patch going until fruiting slows.

    #261060
    TamandcoTamandco
    Member

    I’ve read a whole heap on this subject. Can’t remember where though but they were very specific in recommending the following.

    Buy your disease free plant to start with and plant it somewhere isolated from your proposed strawberry patch. Don’t use a runner from another plant.

    Harvest runners off this plant, and don’t allow any of it’s runners to establish. I can’t rembember what it suggested about the fruit from this plant.

    Plant the runners in another location. Use these to harvest fruit only. Don’t harvest runners from these, and from memory I’m pretty sure it suggested just to let the runners go, don’t worry about cutting them off.

    <muttering to self “Now where’d I get all this from? Gardening Australia? Might check their website.”>

    #261061
    forestforest
    Member

    I agree with the above, if you start with virus-free plants and have no problems with disease while growing them, you can take the runners off.

    Strawberries generally have a three year life – with year 2 and 3 as your main crops. I take the first runners to develop and make that my new plant, but I only allow that to fruit in the second year. If you allow fruit in the first year, it’s scrawny. I’ve had good success following this three year thing.

    Also strawbs are in the rose family, so can stand a lot of pruning. When my plants are established and not fruiting, I cut them right back and when they start growing again, they have increased vigour.

    #261062
    FranceyneFranceyne
    Member

    Has anyone grown strawberries from seed?

    If so – is it just me or do they take forever to be of planting out size?

    #261063
    TamandcoTamandco
    Member

    Fran, good on you for trying! So they actually sprouted then?

    We’ve got wild strawbs down near our creek. Gorgeous little bright red things, but no taste. I’ll try and get a photo.

    #261064
    forestforest
    Member

    Fran, are they alpines?

    #261065
    FranceyneFranceyne
    Member

    I’ve have both Alpine Bush and Temptation seeds to germinate – but they are still little wispy plants and they have been in the pots for nearly 18 months! They are about 2 cm tall. They are really cute though.

    I went out and brought soil for my large strawberry pot and got a few of those hanging strawberry bags….a bit eager…I used the soil else where and the pot and bags are gathering dust 😆

    #261066
    sabinesabine
    Member

    hmm, that’s a bit of work involved to take of strawbs, but its worth it! unfortunately my ducks love strawberries too so this batch i transplant will go under some wire. then it will really be worth it, as i’ll actually get more than a few overlooked ones!!

    peace,

    sabine

    #261067
    TamandcoTamandco
    Member

    Here’s a photo of the wild strawberries which grow down near our creek.

    Cute hey?

    #261068
    forestforest
    Member

    I’m moving down there, Tam. 😉 What a gorgeous perfect strawberry. What do they taste like?

    #261069
    sabinesabine
    Member

    its very cute! does yours taste like cardboard, or is it only me? i’ve never had any luck with wild strawberries. but i just got a tip from a lady at the markets this weekend about making bush tucker like brazil cherries taste better – she reckons a bit of sulphate of potash should sweeten things up. anyone tried that?

    peace,

    sabine

    #261070
    TullymoorTullymoor
    Member

    it’s beautiful! Looks like something from a children’s story book. You could write a kid’s story about your creek and all it’s inhabitants Tam!

    #261071
    TamandcoTamandco
    Member

    LOL! Our place is like a kid’s adventure playground. Now it’s also looking like the proverbial children’s zoo, you know the type that do birthday parties? 😆 :rol:

    Is that potash sprinkled on top? Or do I have to nurture the bush tucker Sabine? Yes they are rather tasteless, but my son says they’re yummy, I reckon cos he found and picked them himself.

    #261072
    forestforest
    Member

    I put potash on almost all of my fruiting plants. It sweetens then, promotes more flowers (and fruit) and it strengthens the plant.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 15 total)
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.