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Spaghetti Squashes and the Paleo Diet

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  • #256648
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    So I’m loosely following what they call the Paleo diet.. Lots of info on the net so I won’t bore you with it.. Anyway.. I received an email from my fave site at the moment, and it mentioned a recipe for Paleo Spaghetti.. Now I love Spag bol so was keen to read.. So a general rule of Paleo is, if the caveman didn’t have it, neither should you.. so pasta is out.

    http://nerdfitness.com/blog/2012/02/21/how-to-cook-paleo-spaghetti/

    So I’m wondering, who can shed some light on these Spaghetti Squashes ?? And does any one have any seeds 🙂

    #520525
    mauzimauzi
    Member

    Hey Dan, We are doing a similar diet. In regards to the spaghetti squash, I grew them in northern NSW and will again next season. I really like them, tastes like squash really but interesting. Sort of a spaghetti texture and easy to grow. I got my original seeds from Phoenix Seeds in Tas.

    #520526
    BlueWrenBlueWren
    Member

    Dan, I have a spaghetti squash waiting to be used, first ever – have been hesitating to cut into it because I don’t think I will be able to disguise it enough for DH to think it’s really spaghetti. He won’t touch anything loosely or closely related to “squash”!!!

    However ,I really want to try it so I’m going to have lots of seeds.If you can wait for them to dry out a bit I’ll be happy to send you some.If you want some please pm me with your address.If you want to get them from elsewhere or commercially that’s fine of course.

    #520527
    donkeynomaddonkeynomad
    Member

    I grow them every year. They taste very nutty and delicious – and I hate squash usually.

    Make sure you don’t do what I did the first time I tried one. I put it in the microwave without cutting it in half first – WOW it exploded and what a mess. I prefer the taste of them microwaved rather than baked but there are a few ways of cooking them.

    I don’t think you can easily disguise it as pasta so you might just have to tell your husband that it is vegetable spaghetti and not mention the word ‘squash’ :whistle:

    #520528
    KatieKKatieK
    Member

    But with some butter (or lots) and salt and pepper – very yummy.

    Or: make a spag sauce with lots of fresh tomatoes, herbs, garlic and fold through like you would with pasta. Think the caveman would eat that Dan ;-).

    I usually cut them in half and steam mine and just call it spaghetti veg too, rather than squash.

    Blue Wren, I think the term spaghetti really just refers to the way it looks after scraping a fork lengthwise along the flesh after its cooked. It’s really worth trying, we love them.

    #520529
    BlueWrenBlueWren
    Member

    So – in the microwave? Cut in half longways, remove seeds, then what Katie? If you chop it up you’ll lose the spaghetti effect? The one I have is 26cm long.

    #520530
    AirgeadAirgead
    Member

    KatieK post=338871 wrote: But with some butter (or lots) and salt and pepper – very yummy.

    Or: make a spag sauce with lots of fresh tomatoes, herbs, garlic and fold through like you would with pasta. Think the caveman would eat that Dan ;-).

    I usually cut them in half and steam mine and just call it spaghetti veg too, rather than squash.

    Blue Wren, I think the term spaghetti really just refers to the way it looks after scraping a fork lengthwise along the flesh after its cooked. It’s really worth trying, we love them.

    I dunno Katie, depending on what period of caveman he is trying to be he may not have discovered fire yet…I’ll definitely disallow microwaves. And forks come to think of it.

    Certainly no butter (domestication of animals – early bronze age.. sorry). No pepper (unless you are a cave man from India). I’ll let you have salt though.

    Cave men did have wheat though. Not as pasta certainly, not ground into flour and not domesticated but they have found charred wild grass seeds (ie: ancient wheat) in archaeological sites dating back from the very early stone age before modern humans. They didn’t cultivate them but they certainly ate them. Probably roasted on a fire to soften them. If we go later to say 40,000 years ago they were probably crushing them up and making a paste which would be roasted like a scone. There is a lot of Aboriginal bush tucker done like that.

    Cheers

    Dave

    #520531
    KatieKKatieK
    Member

    Blue Wren, I just use the steamer (double boiler thingy) on top of the stove. Cut lengthwise in half – haven’t ever tried it in the microwave, but guess it would turn out similar.

    Airgead, who needs forks? a cuppla long, strong, fingernails would do the job.

    Was thinking the tomatoes, herbs etc would be bush tucker – so acceptable maybe?

    And ok, I admit the butter (cow) was stetching it a bit, but they had dinosaurs back then. The caveman could have sent the wife out to milk one, and churn it about in the stomach of whatever they used to carry liquids until it was butter.

    Seriously though, its a nice vegie which lends itself to a variety of uses based on whatever things you can eat in your diet.

    #520532
    zippyzippy
    Member

    Airgead post=338876 wrote:

    I dunno Katie, depending on what period of caveman he is trying to be he may not have discovered fire yet…I’ll definitely disallow microwaves. And forks come to think of it.

    Certainly no butter (domestication of animals – early bronze age.. sorry). No pepper (unless you are a cave man from India). I’ll let you have salt though.

    😆

    Haha! Dave you’re a crack up!

    Blue Wren, Garlic and cheese makes most food acceptable in the eyes of a male.

    #520533
    zippyzippy
    Member

    Oh, this reminds me of some baked oversize zucchinis from a few years ago. My hubby wasn’t looking forward to it, so I layered it with shredded ham from our Christmas meal (had it frozen) then some rough breadcrumbs with garlic ontop and cheese on that.

    He at the whole lot and surprised himself.

    #520534
    BlueWrenBlueWren
    Member

    Sorry katieK……it was donkeynomad who used the microwave.Thanks for your ideas.

    #520535
    IdunaIduna
    Member

    I cut mine in half brush on a little olive oil and roast in the oven, shred it and poor my spag sauce on top. I can’t really eat wheat so I love it. It does taste sweet to me and mine is always a little crunchy even thought it is well cooked. DH eats it fine he’s not fussed by it.

    I love it and will be growing more next year than I did this year.

    #520536
    fruitfulfruitful
    Member

    for caveman salt and pepper, australian style, you could use saltbush and ground nasturtium seeds – they are supposed to be peppery!! I’m drying salt bush leaves to grind but I’ve heard you can just finely chop the fresh leaves for a salty taste.

    Sounds very very interesting this spaghetti squash, I may have to get hold of some seeds and try it out!! thanks for all the tips on cooking etc peoples

    :hug:

    #520537
    BlueWrenBlueWren
    Member

    I’m going to cook my spaghetti squash in the the next day or two so I guess I will have some seeds! Anyone who wants some just pm me , and when they are ready dried I will ask you for your address.I got my squash from a member of our Permaculture Group and her plants set heaps of them.

    #520538
    lisannelisanne
    Member

    Another alternative is julienned zucchini. I try to follow a similar way of eating – for me it’s low carb but I pretty much eat mostly whole foods and dairy – no flour, sugar, grains.

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