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Sourdough starter

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  • #256857
    mistyhollowsmistyhollows
    Member

    Does anyone out there in ALS world have an easy peasy sourdough starter recipe?

    I know Airgead has his recipe on here for sourdough bread but I need a starter to make the bread 😉 .

    Thanks muchly!

    #523093
    LeeAndJLeeAndJ
    Member

    Hi Mistyhollows!

    I have had my starter for several years now, but I remember it being very easy to make the starter (if you can’t beg some from a friend….)

    All I did was to get some organic, unbleached wholemeal flour from the supermarket and mix it with some un-chlorinated water (ie rainwater, or still mineral water). I think I used about a cup of each. Just leave it in an uncovered bowl in a warmish place for a few days and it should start to bubble. It is then ready for use.

    I found that it made OK bread at that stage, but it definitely improves over time.

    Good luck,

    Lee.

    #523094
    BlueWrenBlueWren
    Member

    ALS continues to amaze me! I receive Linda Woodrow’s blog “The Witches Kitchen” and today she posted a sourdough pita recipe.

    OK says me.How do I get the starter , must get onto Google ………so I come on here first this evening …..and now I know!!

    Thankyou!

    #523095
    GumnutGumnut
    Member

    Hi there – I found this to be helpful when I made my first starter as it has pictures etc to go by too http://sourdough.com/blog/sourdom/beginners-blog-starter-scratch

    Whenever I’ve done mine it’s been about 1/2 white and 1/2 rye flour then enough water to make a thick gluggy paint consistency. I’ve never added fruit or juice like some recipes I’ve read have said.

    I remember reading somewhere that the yeasty beasts don’t really get a foothold until about 9+ days (also remember reading that around day 4 the starter will be really frothy but not to use it then because it’s a different microbe making the froth, not yeast, and it doesn’t taste/smell good).

    Main thing to to ensure that you scrape down the sides of your container and ensure you clean any spills with a clean cloth to ensure that no nasties grow. I also periodically freeze a portion of the starter just in case. This apparently will remain viable for 3 months or so.

    Good luck! 🙂

    #523096
    BelBel
    Member

    Hi mistyhollows. I’ve just started a sourdough starter myself. I’ve used Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall’s recipe from River Cottage everyday. Seems to be going well so far. Here’s the recipe:

    In a large bowl, mix 100g strong bread flour (at least 50% wholegrain flour, such as wholemeal, spelt or wholegrain rye) with enough warm water to make a batter roughly the consistency of thick paint. Beat it well to incorporate some air, then cover with a lid or cling film and leave somewhere fairly warm (on the TV series, Hugh says you can add a small piece of rhubarb at this stage to assist with activating fermentation, then remove once fermentation begins). Check it every few hours until you can see that fermentation has begun – signalled by teh appearance of bubbles on teh surface and a small of… well, of fermentation (it can actually smell quite unpleasant adn acrid at this stage but don’t worry, it will mellow as it matures). The time it takes for your starter to begin fermenting can vary hugely – it could be a few hours or a few days. But make your starter with wholegrain flours (which offers more for the yeast to get its teeth into), keep it warm adn draught free adn you should be rewarded with the first signs of life within 24 hours.

    Your starter now needs regular feeding. Begin by whisking in another 100g or so of fresh flour and enough water to retain that thick batter consistency. You can switch to using cool water and to keeping teh starter at normal room temperature – though nowhere too cold or draughty. Leave it again, then, 24 hours or so later, scoop out adn discard half the starter adn stir in another 100g flour and some more water. Repeat this discard-and-feed routine every day, maintaining the sloppy consistency and keeping your starter at room temperature, and after 7-10 days you should have something that smells good – sweet, fruity, yeasty, almost boozy – having lost any harsh, acrid edge. By this stage, it should be actively enticing you into baking with it. But don’t be tempted to bake a loaf until it’s been on teh go for at least a week.

    If you’re going to bake bread every day or 2, maintain your starter in this way, keeping it at room temperature, feeding it daily, and taking some of it out whenever you want to create a sponge. However, if you want to keep it for longer between bakings, you can simply add enough flour (but no water) to turn it from a batter into a stiff dough, then it won’t need another feed for 4 days or so. You’ll just need to add more water when you come to make the sponge. Alternatively, you can lull your starter into dormancy by cooling it down – it will keep for a week in the fridge without needing to be fed. You’ll then need to bring it back to room temperature and probably give it a fresh feed to get it bubbling and active again. Combine these two approaches – keep your starter as stiff dough in teh fridge – and you can leave it for 2 weeks before it will need your attention again. If you know you won’t be baking for a while, you can even freeze the starter, it will reactivate on thawing.

    #523097
    SteveSteve
    Keymaster

    I follow Cultures for Heath on Facebook and they just posted a status on sourdough donuts with a link to creating a starter from scratch. (coincidence? :))

    https://www.facebook.com/permalink.php?story_fbid=279773455441531&id=87402993496

    They used unsweetened pineapple juice to start it. Here is the direct link…

    http://peasandthankyou.com/2012/03/20/how-to-make-and-maintain-your-own-sourdough-starter/

    #523098
    BlueWrenBlueWren
    Member

    Thanks everyone……..I can feel a whole new learning curve coming on!! :laugh:

    #523099
    SnagsSnags
    Member

    Im newish to this

    My original starter was 2 years old,it got mouldy and I threw it out my new one is over 6 months old now.

    I use pineapple juice and flour in mine.

    #523100
    SteveSteve
    Keymaster

    OK, I just started my starter with flour and pineapple juice.

    I just bought some homebrand pineapple rings as the Golden Circle pineapple in fresh juice contained pear juice concentrate! :ohmy:

    #523101
    BobbeeBobbee
    Member

    I’m new to all this too.

    I’ve just put my sourdough starter together. I used bio-dynamic whole grain rye flour and bio-dynamic bread flour and tank water.

    Will let you know how it goes. :tup:

    Thanks for those links Steve, and thanks to everyone else for their info and the support of having others having a go for the first time. :clap:

    :hug:

    #523102
    mistyhollowsmistyhollows
    Member

    Wow thanks everyone :tup: . I can’t wait to get started!

    #523103
    BobbeeBobbee
    Member

    I just had to come back on site to tell you “My starter has bubbles”, hooray henry!!!!!! :woohoo:

    :hug:

    #523104
    AirgeadAirgead
    Member

    Hi Guys

    There shouldn’t be any need to use sugar or juice in a starter to get it going. There is plenty of wild yeast and lacto bacteria on the flour. Just add water and mix. Feed every couple of days until its well established. If you use sugar you can preferentially select for yeast and bacteria that eat sugar rather than starch so once you stop feeding it sugar the starter can collapse.

    I find its best to cover the starter with gladwrap or similar. Contrary to popular opinion, the beasties that make the starter go don’t come from the air but from the flour. Very little of the microflora in a starter is from the local environment. You are more likely to get undesirables like fungi from the local environment.

    Alternatively, you can shoot me a PM and I’ll send you a bit of mine…

    Cheers

    Dave

    #523105
    SnagsSnags
    Member

    If you have a plastic container with a loose fitting lid, about 2 litres capacity, then you have the perfect vessel for starter to live in. If you only have, say, a honey container with a tight sealing lid, then puncture the lid with a knife so a little air can pass through.

    Ultimately, this will become your starter’s abode. It lives in your refrigerator between uses, and will be left out before use to thaw slightly, so as activity is happening. If you are in a warm climate in mid summer, you will need to only bring the starter out of the fridge for an hour or less when you are making bread. If you live in a cold climate, the starter may live out of the fridge all the time. This of course something which you will adapt according to your experience – but I have found that the fridge is the best default storage area, as they run at a consistent temperature and are reasonably immune from airborne contaminants.

    http://www.sourdoughbaker.com.au/starters/liquid-sourdough-starters/starting-the-sourdough-starter.html

    This is a good website

    #523106
    BelBel
    Member

    Here’s a pic of my 7 day-old starter. I’ve only used flour/water throughout the process (with the exception of a piece of rhubarb placed in the mix on day 1 for a couple of hours). I’ve been following Hugh F-W’s process and it seems to be bubbling along nicely…..

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