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Saving seeds from Snow Peas – Do they have to be dry?

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  • #256937
    silentC
    Member

    I saved some pods from the end of my snow pea plants last year – I waited until the vines were virtually dead and the pods were quite dry, then I put them away in a paper bag until March when I planted some. I’ve been impressed with how well they’ve done, with nearly every seed I planted germinating, and we’re eating snow peas already.

    However I’ve nearly run out of the seeds I saved and I’d like to plant some more. But can I get viable seed from pods now, or do I have to wait until later in the season? If I let a few on one plant go until full size, then pick them and let them dry out, would that work?

    #524053
    fruitful
    Member

    I’ve not had any experience with that silentC, certainly worth trying that idea, I’ve always saved far more seeds than I use because I allow for failure in every step, germination, transplanting etc. Give it a go and see what happens but please do let us know.

    #524054
    silentC
    Member

    Yes I might give it a go I think. The hard part will be not picking them 🙂

    The seeds I got last year from my plants have been fantastic. Only had one or two fail and they grow really fast. I’ve got some normal pea seeds (Greanfeast) which I’m only getting 50% success rate with and they take ages to do anything.

    Think I might stick to snow peas…

    #524055
    lmd80
    Member

    I’m very interested to know how you go…

    #524056
    Kasalia
    Member

    If you mark your plant with a ribbon so you dont pick anything fromit and let the pods mature to at least yellow crinkly look, they are just about ready, but letting them dry completely is better. The whole idea of a plant is to go to seed and once it does it doesnt grow as well so keep it for your seed producing one.

    I have had madagascar beans which you pick when dry open and fall to the ground where the beans have sprouted and an ear or corn and beans left on the ground get wet and sprout.

    Now that you have delved into the world of seed saving try it with lettuce,tomato,broccoli,chinese cabbage all are easy and the flowers look great, and bring lots of beneficial insects. I keep my seeds in small zip lock bags which I label as it is easy to mix them up.

    Your peas are fresh so most will germinate whereas the purchased ones you dont know really how old they are. Always buy heirloom or non hybrid seeds as well. I have noticed bunnings selling heirloom plants now which would be good to get a starter on collecting seeds. Good luck.

    #524057
    silentC
    Member

    OK Thanks. Good idea with the ribbon. I’m not the only one who goes ‘shopping’ in the vege garden so I will have to make sure everyone knows the rules.

    With the pods last season, I left them on the plant until the vines died right off. The pods weren’t completely dry but they sat on a shelf in my garden shed for a couple of months and were completely dry when I planted them. I might try some at different stages to see what happens.

    Regarding the other peas, I got the seeds from Eden Seeds and I’ve found the quality is pretty good. I thought maybe the variety doesn’t do well down here, or they don’t like my soil.

    I’ve saved tomato seeds which seems easy enough. Will give some of the others a go too.

    #524058
    silentC
    Member

    No such thing as a quick experiment in gardening.

    I left the pods on one plant until they rattled when I shook them. Then I picked a handful and put them in a paper bag for a week. Then I put 12 seeds into my milk carton pots. It has taken a couple of weeks but I finally have some shoots, about half so far. I was hopeful because I could see the little mounds forming a few days ago.

    So there you go, I’ve got successful germination from seeds that I took from the first crop of the same season.

    #524059
    Miaowzen
    Member

    You can sprout dried peas from the supermarket and I assume they would have been dehydrated instead of waiting for them to dry on the vine. I didn’t think twice and just dehydrated the biggest peas and replanted them. Hopefully all good!

    #524060
    silentC
    Member

    How do you dehydrate them? I’d like to give that a go if it’s quicker.

    #524061
    Miaowzen
    Member

    I have a nine-tray Excalibur dehydrator. But any dehydrator will do.

    Otherwise you can try putting them in a paper bag and leaving it under the back window of a car.

    #524062
    Jayne
    Member

    I would love to know how you went with the dehydrated peas germination rate Miaowzen?

    I saved some pods that were not quite dried but very swollen, as I had to pull out the vines for another crop. Just wondering if I should leave them in the pods or pull the peas out, and then dry them naturally? Thanks.

    #524063
    silentC
    Member

    I just left mine in the pods and put them in a paper bag on the window sill until the pods were dry. They germinated fine with not many failures.

    #524064
    Snags
    Member

    Paper bags and window sills are good for lots of seeds,I do lettuce,broccoli,onion and lots more flower heads that way.

    Beans and peas I usually leave in a small cardboard box by the window

    #524065
    Gumnut
    Member

    Love this! Well done. Have been reading up on seed saving and plant breeding too lately. It’s exciting to think the seed you save is already starting to tailor to your garden conditions (and your gardening style) because it’s from plants that survived! :laugh:

    #524066
    lmd80
    Member

    I put some dead snow pea plants in the bottom of a new garden and left the pods and now have a bunch of snow peas!! Can they grow in the heat? Or should I just use them as sprouts?

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