Aussies Living Simply

Roses

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  • #254877
    caddiecaddie
    Participant

    Roses, Roses and still more Roses!

    I like roses but I am just a bit overwhelmed by the number I now have.

    They are every where and badly in need of pruning.

    What to do with the prunings is a matter for thought.

    Just put them on the heap to burn?

    Just heap them on the compost heap and hope that works?

    Or put them through a shredder before putting them on the compost heap?

    Any thoughts on the matter?

    #494960
    BelBel
    Member

    I’ve found that rose prunings are sharper and more needly as they dry. I’ve come across lengths of rose prunings in the compost that have ripped my hands. I’ve now pulled out all our roses! In any event, we also have boysenberries which are very similar and we either put them through the mulcher before composting or stick them in the green waste bin (the council composts/shreds it all and re-sells it as compost or mulch).

    #494961
    Lady BeeLady Bee
    Keymaster

    We’ve got a deer that’s semi pet. She prunes all our roses to the point where we haven’t seen a flower all year. Want me to lend her to you?

    In the past we used to put them through the mulcher/shredder and put them on the compost heap.

    #494962
    GrethGreth
    Member

    At our place, rose prunings are fed to the fire, no wish to meet up with thorns in the compost, or here we can toss them out where only the roos, sheep and rabbits will deal with them.

    #494963
    RobyneRobyne
    Member

    I am about due to prune mine last year I put them in the council collection, I did put them in the compost and like all of you found them later. Gardening Australia said one year not to compost them as they are dangerous

    Mine are old world roses the scent is lovely.

    #494964
    caddiecaddie
    Participant

    Thank you all,

    previously I only had a few and did put the prunings on the heap to burn.

    There are just so many here I did wonder if I could use them but I will take your advice and add them to the heap.

    Although I must say I like the sound of the deer, that would be handy to clean out the river bank I think!

    #494965
    porgeyporgey
    Member

    I must admit I love the smell of roses and some look terrific. They are even a safe habitat for some Eastern Spoonbills that I am trying to build up the population of. However the thorns are a nightmare so not having shreddeer nor putting them straight into the compost I burn them then use the charcoal and potash in the veggie garden. I do remember one year letting the goat free range and she practically ate the whole garden so maybe buy / hire / borrow a goat for a weekend and ALL your pruning worries will be over.

    #494966
    BullseyeBullseye
    Member

    If you didn’t want to burn rose prunings, what if the prunings were placed into a container of water to make a compost tea. The remaining thorns that would take a longer time to breakdown, may become less or not hazardous – they might lose their point. Then the partially rotted thorns could be put into the compost heap with whatever else remains strained off in the container.  B)

    PS what is a rose without a scent!?!

    #494967

    Do you know anyone who wants to start a rose garden? You could pass the prunings on and they could try striking them. We have received similar from neighbours and had some luck.

    #494968
    TheExpertVGLTheExpertVGL
    Member

    Pruning rose bushes is intimidating to many gardeners, but actually very good for the plants. Becoming an accomplished rose pruner takes time and practice, but keep in mind that it is very hard to kill a rose with bad pruning.

    #494969
    caddiecaddie
    Participant

    I managed to find some younger people to do a major prune for me and then burnt the prunings, along with tree and shrubs prunings.

    Was a nice big bonfire!

    The roses responded with a wonderful display.

    I was intending to buy a port wine magnolia, just hadn’t found one when the large shrub I had thought was a camellia flowered, yep was a magnolia.

    Between it and the roses the perfume was wonderfull.

    I have planted fruit trees, 8 jacarandas plus 100 eucalypts now just have to get them all through this summer.

    Have installed trickle to lighten the work load a bit.

    #494970
    GirlFridayGirlFriday
    Member

    Rose clippings are the only vegetable matter that go straight in the wheelie bin and to the tip. Mine have NASTY thorns!

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