Aussies Living Simply

propagating mulberries

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  • #255772
    sue esue e
    Member

    My daughter and her partner are moving into their own home in about 6 months and they have asked us to take some cuttings from our mulberry tree so they can put one in their yard when they finally move in. Everything I have read says that its nearly impossible to strike from cuttings 🙁 Has anyone has success with this? It is a black mulberry and a prolific bearer so it would be good if we could propagate it.I feel sure that it came from a cutting that my dad took from a tree down Yamba way but I may be mistaken. :shrug:

    #508765
    starrubystarruby
    Member

    Hi Sue,

    I’m not sure about cuttings I’m sure it could be done but haven’t done it myself. You will have to wait for a wiser person than me 🙂

    I just wanted to say that my 3 year old black mulberry has so far got two new mulberry trees growing within 3 feet of it, only small ones. Not sure if this is normal but I’ve dug one up and put it in a pot. Seems to be surviving.

    If you cannot strike a cutting I could dig the other one up and send it to you. they seem pretty tough plants so hopefully it would survive the post.

    Sandra

    #508766
    bushybushy
    Member

    Hahaha….just goes to show you cant believe everything you read, mulberries would have to be the easiest thing to strike from cuttings I have ever seen, and Ive grown plenty of stuff to sell.

    Even the time of year doesnt make any difference, I found a new variety last year when in full leaf and I started a few plants and off they went.

    I pruned a big tree a couple of years ago and left the prunings where they laid…..every single one sprouted roots

    #508767

    lol bushy u have an extra green thumb ( maybe your whole hand?) :laugh: i have not had that much success with cuttings but seedlings are prolific, but possibly not as true to type. i have heard if u layer the cuttings before cutting them from the tree so they start to grow roots is quite successful , or just use heaps of rooting hormone to help. good luck and may the mulberry be with you . lolz

    #508768
    bushybushy
    Member

    I wish rcd….I still struggle getting Grevillias to do their thing and poincetias are a bit hit miss with my striking techniques

    #508769
    karyn26karyn26
    Member

    testing will this reply go thru

    YAY :clap: I can finally reply.

    I do the same as bushy,last year DH got me some mulberry cuttings and I planted them out I had some die but others made it.

    I have recently trimmed them down they were super tall.

    I kept the cuttings and planted them also.

    The original cuttings have since been transferred to the orchard and have grown new leaves and what looks like tiny fruit.

    Give it a go if the tree is big enough it wont mind a few cuttings taken.

    #508770
    karyn26karyn26
    Member

    The original cuttings grown up and now in the orchard transplanted in aug ’11

    #508771
    sue esue e
    Member

    So at this time of year soft wood or hard wood? I had an idea they would thorw roots in water. Has anybody had experience with this? thanmks all for your responses. 🙂

    #508772
    AnjaAnja
    Member

    A friend in QLD just sent me some cuttings. I have put them all in pots, some in morning sun, some in full sun and some in the shade. None are looking too healthy, but it’s only been a week, so I won’t give up yet!!

    #508773
    bushybushy
    Member

    You are complicating things sue…… just take some cuttings 300mm or so, get some old wood but can have new tips, poke em in the ground or a pot if you wish, of course in a shady spot so they dont dry out before taking root.

    Now is a good time to do it.

    #508774

    do u think this would also work on fig trees?

    #508775
    bushybushy
    Member

    I start all my fig trees from suckers…..never tried cuttings

    #508776

    I have been wanting to try some mulberry cuttings but had resigned myself to waiting until next winter. Perhaps I will give it a go now anyway. Can’t hurt anything!

    I have read that figs are incredibly easy to grow from cuttings, but that you should do it in winter when the tree is completely dormant. I might try it this spring though just for kicks. I was also going to take some of the lower branches on my fig tree where they almost touch the ground, and cover them with soil/mulch to see if they root. One branch has already done this naturally and has figs on it already, at about 5 feet tall.

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