Aussies Living Simply

Potato Harvest

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  • #253526
    Thalass
    Member

    Hey folks. Our potato plants have died back recently – they’ve been completely dead for a couple of days now but i’ve been working so i haven’t harvested the spuds yet. My question is: Is it too late to eat the potatoes? Will they be too green, so i should leave them as stock for next season, or will it be ok?

    Thanks guys. 🙂

    #480985
    becca
    Member

    Dig them up and see!! They should be OK, I think.

    #480986
    osakasuz
    Member

    The green comes from being exposed to the sun – the ones underground will generally be fine. I forgot some and found them about a month after pulling the rest up (the tops had long gone) and the spuds were fine!

    #480987
    Thalass
    Member

    Awesome. Thanks for that, i was a bit worried!

    I took a photo to show it, the spuds are the dead plants in the foreground, with a random tomato on the left and in the path. Pumpkins between the spuds and onions also on the left. Behind that is the corn with a few pumpkin plants and (as soon as they sprout) beans. The jungle behind the water heater is where last year’s compost was – it’s got tomatoes, corn that was left over from the main planting, and either pumkin or cucumber (or both). All doing really well despite being plants that don’t like each other much (corn and tomato, at least) and being really close to each other. That compost stuff is great! And on the right is the lettuce, beans and carrots that we planted today. We’re having bad luck with carrot seeds so seedlings from bunnings it is. haha.

    Anyway thanks, i’ll dig the spuds up thisarvo and see what we have!

    #480988
    Thalass
    Member

    Wow what a haul! Well, not by ALS standards, of course, but compared to last year’s three small spuds it’s quite good! I don’t know what to do with the teeny tiny ones, but we’ll munch on the decently sized ones. If it wasn’t for a lack of water (oops) and last week being a bit warm, they may have grown bigger.

    The potatoes that these grew from were pretty gross, though. Squishy, smelly, kinda puss-juicy… really bad. Also with white spots on them, so i’ve chucked them out and cleared the soil of any pieces. I’m not sure if it’ll be ok, but for now i’ve split up and replanted our largest onion plant in three places, and later on i’ll put something different in. Hopefully that’ll flush the soil clean of potato diseases. I guess.

    #480989
    busylizzie
    Participant

    Nice haul Thalass, :tup: homegrown spuds taste nothing like the bought ones. The spuds are ok in the ground for quite awhile after the plants have died back, so dont panic next time you grow them. A great use of space down the side of your house, well done on a nice little productive area. :clap:

    Cheers

    Lizzie

    #480990
    Boonahgirl
    Member

    Easier to peel too. And they taste so creamy. Good job.

    #480991
    Thalass
    Member

    Thanks guys! Its taken a couple of weeks to actually get around to eating them. And man they were really nice! We ate them all, though. I was going to save one or two for next growing season, but they were so nice we forgot haha.

    Actually, about that, is it healthy to re-propagate plants for years on end? Isn’t it the same plant (genetically), which could make it vulnerable to disease? Like how commercial bananas are nearly extinct or something.

    #480992
    hortgirl
    Member

    Hi there,

    Am growing spuds for the first time this year (finally got a veggie garden big enough!)…this morning I noticed they all have pink flowers, is this the time to harvest for little chat size ones or do they need to be in a bit longer?

    Tia B)

    #480993

    Hi there Hortgirl,

    Its a good sign that your potato plants are flowering but they are not ready to harvest yet. Regarding the growing cycle of spuds, when they flower it means that they’ll have lots of tiny little potatoes in the ground. From here on they wont produce many more new spuds, but the existing ones will grow to a big size. Just hang in there, keep the water up and hope for not too many hot days (spuds wont put on size if its too hot). When the plants naturally start dying back then you are, more-or-less, ready for harvest.

    Hope you get a good crop 🙂

    Joe Bananas.

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