Aussies Living Simply

Plant ID please

Viewing 12 posts - 1 through 12 (of 12 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #257513
    VanessaVanessa
    Member

    Can anyone point me in the right direction as to what this plant is??

    I would say that it is about 1.2m (ish) tall/round

    and a close up of the “flower” spikes

    #530014
    AlanEAlanE
    Participant
    #530015
    JarnJarn
    Member

    Right genus AlanE but I would tend more to Lomandra fluviatilis based on its form and the flower spikes,the spiklets (needle like parts of the flower spikes point up where as the longifolia point in a more downward position, and the leaf tips look more like fluviatilis. But saying that longifolia and fluviatilis have been know to hybridize making it more confusing. Its definitely one or both in the case of a hybrid, If you are wanting to replace or buy more Lomandra fluviatilis will provide a larger form then longifolia so that may assist in choice. 🙂

    http://plantnet.rbgsyd.nsw.gov.au/cgi-bin/NSWfl.pl?page=nswfl&lvl=sp&name=Lomandra~fluviatilis

    cheers Jarn

    #530016
    S.O.PS.O.P
    Member

    I just googled L. fluviatilis and the leaves aren’t similar, those in the original post are wider.

    I have approx 30 L. hystrix and 10 L.longifolia and they only way to tell them apart is the leaf colour when very healthy and the leaf tip. The leaf tip is a hard one, I can’t use it but they local nurseryman can ID it via the tip.

    I have some L.hystrix is a western position that look exactly like that, even missing the deep green colour of the leaf.

    And, the plant is male, in case you are wondering.

    #530017
    JarnJarn
    Member

    S.O.P you could be right there, problem remains with a urbanized plant is the chance of hybridization. and both longifolia and fluviatilis are known even in the bush to hybridize ( especially in the Sydney region) which changes the natural variation of features into unknown territory (in ecology rules of Id are always subjected to variation). And all my training is in bush land identification not nursery hybrids. hystrix is not a species that is common in my area as it is found further north but looking at the diagonal tip form it is definitely a very strong contender. I would not be able to confirm the ID and further just from the pics.

    Good spotting

    Cheers Jarn 🙂

    #530018
    VanessaVanessa
    Member

    Thanks guys, it is in our pool enclosure, and is right by our filter and pump.

    Its doing a good job to hid the filter but has nasty spikes which make me itch when I touch it when I need to get to the filter, but it is good to know that it is a lomandra (of some description), there are a few other grassy clumping plants which have been planted by the previous owner, but these have a purple flower and berry, sort of remind me of a blue berry (if my memory is working correctly), will have to keep an eye out for the flowers and berries and get a photo.

    #530019
    S.O.PS.O.P
    Member

    Just cut the spikes, or pull them before you brush up against them. It’s a nice looking specimen.

    Take a picture of the leaf, I have 2 suggestions already.

    A lot of people hedge them into a ball shape, personally i think it makes them look ugly.

    #530020
    S.O.PS.O.P
    Member

    Jarn post=352053 wrote: S.O.P you could be right there, problem remains with a urbanized plant is the chance of hybridization. and both longifolia and fluviatilis are known even in the bush to hybridize ( especially in the Sydney region) which changes the natural variation of features into unknown territory (in ecology rules of Id are always subjected to variation). And all my training is in bush land identification not nursery hybrids. hystrix is not a species that is common in my area as it is found further north but looking at the diagonal tip form it is definitely a very strong contender. I would not be able to confirm the ID and further just from the pics.

    Good spotting

    Cheers Jarn 🙂

    Yeah, I checked, Vanessa is in Adelaide. L.longifolia and L.hystrix are the 2 main Lomandra landscaping plants here, I’m not sure about down there.

    L.hystrix is holding the sides of almost every creek around Brisbane. Quite a versatile plant.

    #530021
    lostinthefoglostinthefog
    Member

    Lomandra…the ugliest plant in the universe…why do they use it so much when there are thousands of more attractive alternatives…leave it in the bush where it belongs!

    #530022
    JarnJarn
    Member

    Reason they use lomandra so much is that is is very drought tolerant, never have to water it (hence the councils love it) it has a deep rooting system that makes it a better choice them most other plants for erosion control, and its form also traps debris and soil in run off events, this is why it is planted along river banks. It also has a high tolerance for water so is a very versatile plant for environmental controls. I actually like the look of the plant, in good condition its a nice looking plant (like most). Also the green fruits on the flower spikes are eatable and taste like green peas and the white base of the leaves is also eatable(also taste like green peas). You just need to be careful it is not in a pollution run off zone as a lot on them are that are used for environmental controls. Great plant I love it. Also if you can establish it, maybe fence it off for a while it will do well in a chook pen and handle the chooks foraging once it is established as most plants will not. The deep roots make it almost impossible for them to scratch it out and offers an forage food in the form of green fruits and new foliage.

    Ps. the blue berry plant if it is a grass like plant and very vibrant blue small berries, try googling Dianella caerulea (Blue Flax Lilly) and see if this looks like your plant. berries are also eatable and very tasty 🙂

    #530023
    lostinthefoglostinthefog
    Member

    Sorry…I just can’t bear it…depresses me just looking at it! And it always looks half dead…I’ve never seen one that looks in good nick wherever they are..!!

    #530024
    S.O.PS.O.P
    Member

    I’ve got heaps in great condition considering the lack of rain for 4 months. Surprising really.

Viewing 12 posts - 1 through 12 (of 12 total)
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.