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Aussies Living Simply

Old Tank Patch and Clean

Viewing 12 posts - 1 through 12 (of 12 total)
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  • #257785
    chareaveschareaves
    Member

    Hi all

    We have an old (probably 25 years old) steel tank. We have river water pumped into it from a river about half a km away. There is a pump on the river bank. We had someone around to the house a year ago when we moved in, to ask about getting it cleaned. He wouldn’t touch it because it was so old and he couldn’t guarantee it wouldn’t fall apart with cleaning. Over the past few weeks it has developed some rather obvious leaks which seem to be getting larger. My questions.

    1. What product would be best to patch the leaks, on the outside of the tank, to save us having to buy a new one?

    2. Is there any kind of additive we can throw into the tank to “clean up” the water quality? The water is not dirty, but it does have tannin, and it is from the river, so it’s probably not the cleanest water. (I should point out that we have a separate smaller tank for rainwater which we use for drinking.)

    #532682
    ballamaraballamara
    Keymaster

    Have you though about putting in a tank liner?

    #532683
    chareaveschareaves
    Member

    No. Never knew such things existed! What sort of cost are they, and how easy to install. Seems to me it would be far easier to plug the hole, though.

    #532684
    caddiecaddie
    Participant

    I think you will find as you patch one hole another appears!!

    We did reline one with fibre glass years ago, was a sod of a job and I cant remember what the cost was.

    I don’t know about the cost for a plastic or rubber liner is.

    Personally I would get a new tank and use the old one for garden beds.

    If you are using river water I would go for poly.

    #532685
    ballamaraballamara
    Keymaster

    The tank liner we used was a heavy food grade plastic. From memory the cost was $300 plus but that was for 2 tanks. It all depends on the size. Wasn’t that hard to install, HD in his 70’s and I ( in my 60’s) did it between us. I will see if I can find the name of the company if you like. This is the site http://www.abgal.com.au/tank_liners.aspx It has a video on how to install liner.

    #532686
    chareaveschareaves
    Member

    Yes well the option to replace the tank is one we would dearly love to do, but we are trying if possible not to do that as it’s going to cost a lot more at present.

    #532687
    Judi BJudi B
    Keymaster

    caddie post=356560 wrote: I think you will find as you patch one hole another appears!!

    We found that to be true as well, neighbour got a liner for a small tank and it was good but then had to get one for the larger tank and it was a nightmare to install…. if it was me I’d go a large poly tank.

    #532688
    AirgeadAirgead
    Member

    Yeah… 25 years is pretty old for a steel tank. And if its leaking its probably riddled with rust all over.

    You could patch it but it will fall apart further so you will end up constantly spending money and time patching and in spite of all the money and time you will still have an old leaky tank.

    Tank liners are fine but if the actual tank isn’t structurally sound, it will fall apart and the liner can’t support its self. So the liner will only last until the tank fails. Which could be in a few years or might be tomorrow. Or most likely when you are installing the liner leaving you with a useless liner and a broken tank.

    Sometimes the bullet just has to be bitten…

    Cheers

    Dave

    #532689
    SnagsSnags
    Member

    My metal tank is 15 years old but i live near the ocean so salt air is my problem.

    I had the same things but Im still at the rusty weeping stage.

    Neighbour below me had the same problem he spent hundreds painting a water proofing coating on the inside of the tank,it didnt work.

    I bought a new tank and put it in at the top of the hill and filled it with a hose from the bottom tank.

    We got tonnes of rain and the bottom one is full again

    So the veggie garden is going to get all the water it needs this dry season unless the weeps turn into leaks.

    New tank was $2000 delivered 10,000 litres plus gravel to level it

    It hurt as we had other things we needed to fix that we had saved the money for.

    #532690
    AirgeadAirgead
    Member

    On the water quality issue, I don’t think there is an additive yo can add to the tank. You would have to keep adding the additive anyway.

    An inline cartridge filter might be the go though. You can get filter cartridges to filter out pretty much anything. Most setups use a 2 stage filter. One as a dirt screen the other with a charcoal or similar filter to remove colour and odors.

    Cheers

    Dave

    #532691
    SnagsSnags
    Member

    I have an under sink built in 2 stage filter

    I bought it from Aldi pretty cheap and installed it myself pretty easy.

    I removed the charcoal filter and have two regular spun nylon?? filters

    I was told without chlorine the carbon filters would grow some nasty bacteria.

    (not 100% sure its legit but it was from a plumbing tank filter supply shop)

    Get spun filters on ebay in bulk pretty cheap

    Nothing beats cleaning the gutters regularly though.

    #532692
    chareaveschareaves
    Member

    Personally I would get a new tank and use the old one for garden beds.

    This may be what we’ll do. We do have a quote from a plumber friend for $2,100 for a new poly 10,000 L tank, in the colour of our choice. So we know what we’re up for, and in some ways it is much “simpler” to just bite the bullet.

    I guess my question was trying to find a way to live simply, and part of that is not spending $2K on something if we can help it. We really don’t have the money for it, but it’s one of those things, if we have to, we have to. The mortgage suffers.

    We did have a 2-way cartridge filter put on when we first moved in. It did, and has done, precisely nothing. We have clear water for drinking and washing dishes, and this river water for everything else. It’s fantastic for the garden, as we basically have as much as we need for around $160 a year, so there’s no issues there.

    Thanks for the replies everyone.

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