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Not so interested in job security?

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Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 44 total)
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  • #439098
    Tullymoor
    Member

    I lost count of the jobs I’ve had since I was 15yo, I have diddly squat interest in having a job now and everyone around me seems to be quite satisfied with my conversational abilities :tup:

    #439099
    Jeanie
    Participant

    That was a mouthful Tully been reading a Thesaurus:lol:

    #439100
    Tullymoor
    Member

    😉 Love ya Jeanie :hug:

    #439101
    sue e
    Member

    i guess its fear of change? even if its for the better.it doesn’t help that my boss keeps saying “you can’t go. who will look after me .i won’t be able to find anything” kind of stuff. she is a great friend and i understand she is not keen on the change as well. loyalty to her and to the kids we work with comes into it as well. and come to think of it i don’t really talk to many people at work apart from kids and a quick run down from whatever teacher whose room in which i am working at the time is the limit of conversation i have most days. lunch and morning tea is duties.just need the encouragement to keep coming guys. i WILL do it with the help of your kind words. thanks sue:D

    #439102

    it is a huge change and I completely understand your fear. You have spent all of your life being programmed to think that a nine to five job defines you as a responsible citizen and retirement sounds a bit like goofing off (especially when you do it as I have done). To others it means a loss of self-identity as they have defined themselves by their job. I once had a boss who literally had a complete mental melt-down because they removed the word ‘manager’ from his title. He went completely troppo and the last I heard had still not recovered.

    Most super funds provide counselling and seminars for those approaching retirement. While many of these are focussed on financial goals, there are some that are also aimed at helping you make the transition. In addition, most employers of a larger nature provide similar services. Not sure if your employer would have this sort of thing, but if it is a government school then the ed dept should offer something.

    #439103
    sue e
    Member

    that’s it HBG. i guess i feel guilty for enjoying life( i guess that’s my good convent education) hubby keeps telling me i’ve earned it and (he is 3 years younger than i ) as soon as he turns 55 he is outta there. The scary thing is that we have brought all our kids up to be ” responsible citizens” as you said. the thought of them spending the next 40 odd years stuck in the workplace is awful. at least they are all studying towards something that interests them. but it all gets a bit mundane as time goes by i suppose no matter what you are doing. sigh

    #439104

    Yep. I love my job but hated being part of a workplace any more. most jobs these days seem so bogged down in process you never actually make any progress. I prefer to do something where I can achieve something positive for me and the community which is what I will be doing in the future. When I went back to uni as an adult I looked on it as a nine to five job. You can look at retirement in the same way. There is no point lying in bed until noon as some people I know have done. I still get up early, go to bed early and have set tasks for the day most days. If I get through my checklist I feel chuffed. If I get through more than my checklist, then I feel great (if knackered) and if I don’t … well, there is always tomorrow, lol.

    #439105
    sue e
    Member

    sounds like you are talking about education qld HBG -all process and very little progress. OMG don’t get me on that soapboxhaha

    #439106
    Wazza
    Member

    I suppose I’ve tended to hang out with hippy types who view a job (usually part-time, non-stressful) as a necessary evil to glean a bit of cash for those things they can’t be self-sufficient in. People like this have been semi-retired for years, so they have little adjustment to make, if any, when they turn 65. For those who’ve accepted the mainstream propaganda that a job defines who you are as a human being and without one you’ll have no sense of purpose or self-worth, the prospect of retirement must be really scary. The truth in my opinion is that we’re not constructed for the model they push down our throats. The workplace is full of stressed individuals at age 30. How are they going to make it through to age 67 (the retirement age from 2017)? To keep us in line they often run stories in the media. You’ve read them. Joe Blow retires at age 65 and loses all purpose in life – is bored out of his brain and dies a few short years later. Poor Joe. The message – keep being a wage slave for as long as you can or you’ll die young. The truth they don’t want you to know is that most people only discover their real selves and their true purpose in life after they cast off the ball and chain of the full-time workplace. Most have never been happier or healthier. Their only regret being that they didn’t do it sooner.

    #439107

    Yep, ain’t that the truth Wazza. My dad dropped dead of a heart attack, with no prior symptoms, at the age of 67, two years after retirement. I am afraid all that has prompted me to do is retire ten years (and several months) earlier so I get to have some of the good times my working years have earned me. The reason people drop dead so soon after work probably has more to do with the residual effects of the workplace, than the detrimental effects of retirement.

    #439108
    baringapark
    Member

    mental acuity and conversational diversity

    everyone around me seems to be quite satisfied with my conversational abilities

    😆

    😆

    😆

    me too Tulls…although I work with pigs, so I guess they aint fussy

    #439109
    Peter
    Member

    Job security? Has there really been such an animal in the last 20-30 yrs? I have worked in the construction industry all my life and loved it ,I loved the fact that it was itinerant and still is except for a few blue eyes……The days of a job for life are long gone, in fact they were going when I was a boy…..Now days the economy is that volitile and people are more transient, most importantly the majority of employers do not value loyalty…..

    #439110
    Gianna
    Member

    Peter wrote:

    Job security? Has there really been such an animal in the last 20-30 yrs.

    There sure has Peter. I was in the same job for 25 years but the business changed hands 5 times. I was really the only constant. 😆

    #439111
    Peter
    Member

    Then you have been very lucky and sheltered!.. The fact is the traditional idea of job security… A Job For Life, started eroding in the late sixties….. and in fact if you look at world trends in comparative economies……job change is around six to seven years….. actually I believe WAZZA hit the nail on it’s head in his last post!!!!

    Unfortunately Gianna, Your experience is much more unique than it is the norm, evidence of this can be found in the frightening speed of casualization in all industries of jobs that were once considered secure and full time.

    #439112
    Peter
    Member

    @ barringa park, Hi Eliabeth, A little off this subject but .I’m wondering do you castrate your Boars and if so do you use a local anaesthetic, If not have you experienced any Market resistance to non castrated boars??….Just one pig breeder to another!!! and would appreciate your advice!

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