Aussies Living Simply

No Knead Bread Recipe

Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 55 total)
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  • #516975
    LyndyLou
    Member

    I look forward to giving this one a go, might try both types of flour and go from there 🙂 Got another question if you guys don’t mind…. I’ve notice quite a few bread making recipes that call for lining the dish with oil. To date I haven’t put anything in the dish – just made sure the loaf had a nice coat of flour on the bottom… any ideas why you need/use the oil?

    #516976
    calliecat
    Participant

    I guess so it wouldn’t stick, but if flour achieves the same result, then stick with that

    that is my guess anyway 🙂

    #516977
    BlueWren
    Member

    I notice there’s no mention of oiling the dish in Crystal’s recipe.

    The no knead recipe I used for the aforementioned disaster did say to oil the dish, and the dough stuck as if I had used superglue!!

    #516978
    calliecat
    Participant

    well I just realised I made one mistake already lol

    was meant to leave it on bench for a few hours when I first mixed it, I put it straight in the fridge – only have small casserole dish, it’s in the oven now, so we shall see

    and only put 2T water in, – like I said, I only have a small casserole dish lol

    #516979
    calliecat
    Participant

    well mine has stuck to the dish,

    well, it could be cos I didn’t leave it out, when I first mixed it lol

    but I wont be doing it again, will stick to my other recipe lol – I know that one works

    #516980
    crystal
    Member

    ok, usually with bread you dont wash the tins. Once they are ‘seasoned’ you only wipe them out with paper towel after use. If the dish is properly hot for a no-knead then it shouldnt need much oil, but you can spray the outside of the loaf (or blob, in the case of no-knead) before dropping it in.

    I have never used bakers flour, i have used other wholemeals and added grains to mine, but i am on a tight budget, and if i bought other flour it wouldnt be as economical.

    Leaving the mixture out for a few hours is to activate the yeast and give it time to work. Once its in the fridge it goes to sleep and can prevent the bread from rising.

    Hmm did i miss anything?

    Sorry you didnt have much luck calliecat! Ive had disasters too, usually cos my dough was too old. but ive never had a problem with sticking and ive used the round dish, dont even know where it came from, a loaf sorta casserole and done them on flat trays. Your oven and the dish do need to be very hot before you put the dough in.

    #516981
    crystal
    Member

    Ah, i just went back and saw BW’s sticky ummm, mistake… Looks like too much water, so your dough was more ‘runny’ than sticky? When you take it out of the fridge to warm up before cooking make sure you chuck a bit of flour on the outside, or i know someone who uses quick oats on the outside. But if you slightly reduce the water it might work better. You want a sticky but soft dough, not a runny one.

    I mix mine by hand, i make too much at once for my poor stand mixer, so i wooden spoon it, and get DH to have a bash when my shoulder starts to hurt.

    #516982
    calliecat
    Participant

    actually, it came out fine, – it just didn’t rise, and that could be cos I put it straight it in the fridge, at the very beginning, apart from that, I did follow your recipe, amount wise lol

    I still have some of the dough still in the fridge

    oh yeah!! lol, it looks fine on the inside, my oven is not the best, and I did fall asleep and probably the timing of cooking, wasn’t the greatest LOL cos I fell asleep

    I can’t really blame the recipe :laugh: :laugh:

    too many other variables 😛

    think it got the first 30mins, then I turned off and left it in the oven, cos I was falling asleep lol

    #516983
    calliecat
    Participant

    wow – we now have a delete button

    ok, I will be giving this another go – it looks fine, it smells fine. and it tastes fine 🙂

    only next time I wont leave out any steps lol, and hopefully wont want to fall asleep while it’s cooking LOL

    #516984
    mistyhollows
    Member

    Hope this one works for you calliecat. It really is a yummo bread when you get it working. I oil the inside of my old casserole dish with olive oil and have never had a problem with it sticking. Don’t know why it hasn’t worked for others :shrug: I always oil my dishes before baking and then they get washed up after. Works for me but everyones different :hug:

    #516985
    calliecat
    Participant

    I always oil the bread tins when I use them as well – it works fine

    #516986
    Vickie
    Member

    Hey Crystal 🙂

    So you make the No-Knead Bread with plain old flour?

    I have totally sucked at making bread in the last few months, i had a few good batches, but i gave up and started buying shop bread again.

    It takes so much time and then when they flop it’s soul destroying!

    I buy bakers flour and follow the recipe and it’s very ‘random’ as to how it will turn out.

    I am going to try the no knead and will report back 🙂

    BTW Crystal, your blog looks lovely 🙂 will have a better read when i get time:)

    #516987
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    I make the Irish Soda Bread… So easy, so quick.. No knead, no yeast.

    #516988
    crystal
    Member

    Bread is random no matter what flour you use. Humidity, temp, elevation, brand of flour, all play a part in your bread making… I dont pay attention to all the factors, and no, i dont change the recipe depending on my postion above sea level… But paying attention the first time, then modifying the next time is uaually a good way to go. I do oil the casserole dishes but not the tins i have for regular bread.

    Glad your giving it another go Calliecat, and yes, if you dont leave it out, it probably wont rise much.

    A lesson in science:

    Bread gets its spring from the rising. Rising is caused by gas produced by the yeast when it multiplies at room temp. The kneading causes the gluten in the flour to stretch into long strands which helos the texture. Then we let it rise to relax the gluten, so its not chewey. After the first rise of a normal bread, you usually punch the air out and then let it rise again before baking. This releases the strain on the gluten and allows it to relax, which helps it to soften. With no knead we dont punch, as the gluten is worked in the first rising on the bench, then when we put it in the fridge the gluten all relaxes when the yeast starts running out of ‘puff’ and going to sleep. Then we take it out again, and let it warm up and the yeast wakes up and starts doing its thing!

    ok? So all the steps are important, even the waiting part…

    #516989
    calliecat
    Participant

    no wonder it didn’t rise lol, think I only put 2/3c water and not 1+2/3c water. got a second lot sitting on the bench now

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