Aussies Living Simply

my p.o questions

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 19 total)
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  • #253344

    hiya

    Please can somebody tell me when the shtf, and if i have no electricity coming to my house, will water still be pumped to my house?

    Does making the useable water coming outa my taps have anything to do with the electricity supply?:shrug:

    Does that make sense?

    Are people that are stockpiling milk powder, rice,pasta, ect stockpiling bottle water to mix and cook with it? For me its like stockpiling candles and nothing to light them with!!

    Its just that im struggling getting my head around stockpiling food stuffs for long term.

    #479292
    Andre
    Keymaster

    I dare say there if the powergrid dropped, water pressure would too. It isn’t something I’ve looked into, as I’ll be on tank/rain/dam water.

    Perhaps having a rainwater tank installed, for emergencies, could be considered?

    :tup:

    #479293
    Robyne
    Member

    At the moment where we live we have tank that is connected to the house and when the power goes out so does the water.

    We were given 2 small tanks we can use in that time.

    So to answer your question I think all the services will be gone:shrug:

    #479294
    Thisildo
    Participant

    We have solar hot water (gas boosted) which will NOT work without electricity.:shrug:

    We have 4 water tanks which are filled via an electric pump.:shrug:

    We have a solar system which feeds electricity back into the grid but leaves us in the dark with the rest of the neighborhood if the supply goes off.:shrug:

    So to answer your question I think Andre is right. (as usual)

    #479295
    roadwarrior
    Member

    dry_dip_stick wrote:

    hiya

    Please can somebody tell me when the shtf, and if i have no electricity coming to my house, will water still be pumped to my house?

    No. At least not after a few days. Electricity will probably be interrupted locally first as substation repairs and/or damage takes its toll, then this will progress to a wider scale eventually effecting the supply and control of both water and sewage.

    dry_dip_stick wrote:

    Are people that are stockpiling milk powder, rice,pasta, ect stockpiling bottle water to mix and cook with it?

    I have water tanks with a tap that doesn’t rely on a pump.

    I’ve thought about all the things you are probably thinking of now. Think about how you are vulnerable and develop low-tech solutions.

    #479296
    caddie
    Participant

    I have a 3000 gal tank .

    I have installed a low stand pipe that I can get a small bucket under so that I may access the contents without power.

    #479297
    Sonya
    Member

    We’re on tank water (there is no town water here) so when the power’s out so is the water, so we’re putting in a header tank that can gravity feed if the grid goes down. Also thinking of putting in a pump tap (like on a boat) in the kitchen too.

    Saw a great hot shower idea that works when there is no electricity – you just need some slope to make it happen – tank up high, pipes running through compost pile below, then shower below that with water running off into banana grove.

    Here’s a pic of one at the recent Permaculture Convergence in Cairns – this had a pump attached by you can easily use slope as described above.

    Cheers,

    Sonya

    #479298
    goldstone
    Member

    We lived thru the cyclone and subsequent flooding on the central coast a couple of years back and lost power for 5 days. We couldn’t get any money out to buy food not that it mattered cause the local shops had to throw their cold food out cause the fridges didn’t work. We couldn’t get the cars out because of the flooding. We put on gumboots and pulled the blow up boat thru the flooding to buy pasta, rice etc. We used gas to cook and to heat water for the kids to wash in. We went to bed early cause it was too cold to stay up. It was a HUGE learning experience but it gave me a taste of what is to come. We have since bought another house with a wood fire and am planting with the future in mind and have six chickens again. I learnt what type of candles give the best light and what types of food to keep for emergencies. We also played board games and told stories for entertainment, and laughed and helped each other thru. Even though it was only five days, it taught us a lot. We were warned the water would be next to go because the pumping stations did not have electricity to pump the water to our houses. We filled everything we had. So in a round about way, yes, we will lose our water. We have a tank which is not connected and will stay that way and am in the process of getting another tank to plumb in to the house.

    #479299

    thankyou.

    It has given me alot to think about (whilst having slight heart palpatations, and anxiety attacks :rip: Peak Oil Disorder i call it)

    I guess living in suburbia one would find it really hard to cope, with all the outside threats, no matter how much i’ve been paying attention in preparations. I suppose I never am going to know, untill i have lived through even something slight, like goldstone said.

    I think preparing the house would be first on the agenda, water tanks, wood stove, security, productive food supply, would need alot more attention, before i continue stockpiling goods?

    Or i think moving outa town might be the way yo go

    And its also really hard when people around you call you “one of those people” even my hubby dosnt know the stash under the baby’s cot. My 4 yr old said ‘whats this stuff for?” i said “it was for a special occasion”:D

    So i’ll be going out today to buy some bottle water.

    Im ordering 300 new jar lids, for the jars i bought yesterday, and mums bringing round her F.V and I having a lesson in that.

    Cheers

    #479300
    Robyne
    Member

    One of the things that web site Survival mom said was to grow roses and I thought WHY:shrug: but when I reread the piece you grow them very close together to form a barrier but you don’t cut it back.

    I remember reading Jackie French did it on her property but I think it was to keep out the wild life from her veggie patch.

    Neighbours wouldn’t know what you are doing but would ask questions if suddenly you put up a 7 foot fence

    #479301
    Michelle-sm
    Member

    One of the things that web site Survival mom said was to grow roses and I thought WHY but when I reread the piece you grow them very close together to form a barrier but you don’t cut it back

    Or if your in the sub-tropics grow bougainvillea, it is prolific, takes no maintenance and no-one is getting through that prickly little sucker.;)

    #479302
    DanHower
    Member

    Confirming what Goldstone said. It was in winter 2007, and we lived on the Northern Beaches in Sydney.

    The only infrastructure still working was the phone, only landline, not mobile.

    There was no power, no light, no radio, no TV, no heater, cold showers only, and planning for the night where candles and matches would be found.

    Fortunately enough we had only 5 km to an area where power was still on, and after 3 days we went there to a friends place to warm up.

    We still DID have water. It would be hard to imagine 4 days without, not to forget you need water as well to get rid of what you leave behind.

    Those living in the country are probably much better off, and if only because they can disappear behind a bush when urgent while there are no bushes in the City.

    Thanks all for reminding me on working to get out here. It is too easy to forget in everyday life.

    #479303
    Andre
    Keymaster

    DanHower said:

    Thanks all for reminding me on working to get out here. It is too easy to forget in everyday life

    Too damn true, Dan. :tup:

    I reckon that is western societies problem – we’ve grown lazy .. and working for survival seems too inconvenient! :@

    #479304
    RuddyCrazy
    Member

    When cyclone Steve went thru Pt Hedland the day before we filled the bath tub with beer and ice, brought the gas BBQ into the laundry and made sure we had a few spare gas bottles for both cooking and lighting. Everyone said the house we were in would collapse as it was on stumps and raised above the ground. We were basically locked in the house for 5 days and the power went out on the first day. All the fridge contents went into sealed plastic bags and into the bath on a quick home shelf to keep the food above the water line. Unfortunately the beer ran out on the 3rd day but with a heap of fresh water in the bath we had plenty to drink and with still ice in the bath the scotch tasted better with ice.

    Although the house was shaking with near 200K winds it stayed put and later we found out several homes had imploded with no serious injuries. The houses that were destroyed didn’t have any air flow under the house and so the pressure got too great.

    The house we were was on the hedland facing the ocean and man it was a site watching stuff fly by. My mate decided to open the front door and the door slammed against him. after were stopped laughing it took 2 of us to reach the door open to let him out.

    When a cyclone comes around and someone yells out cyclone party that usually the best place to be as one will never go thirsty or hungry when the place around you is blown away.

    #479305
    Shangri La
    Member

    I love that shower idea Sonya! Losing water when the power went out at our last place was a pain. We did have one gravity fed tank at the back of the shed though so i could fill buckets. It would be good to have all garden water gravity fed as I’m sure I used to ramped up the power bill with watering as the pressure pump cut in and out. Have you looked into solar pumps (I haven’t)?

    At our rental house here in town we have an outdoor shower and that is wonderful in summer, that would be great to have on gravity feed if you didn’t have town water. The other thing with town water is they need to cut it off after some natural disasters if it gets contaminated with sewage :rip:

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