Aussies Living Simply

Long term food storage supplies Australia

Home Forums HOMEMADE Home Preserving, Food Storage and Stockpiling Long term food storage supplies Australia

Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 48 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #489318
    KristyKristy
    Member

    Robyne where do you buy bulk from at Thebarton?

    #489319
    Hamish121212Hamish121212
    Member

    You all have to check these out – I want to add this to my storage room and fill it to the brim with cans.

    http://www.shelfreliance.com.au/Harvest72.html

    #489320
    KristyMumTo4KristyMumTo4
    Member

    We get our bulk foods in Perth from Springer Foods.

    http://www.springerfoods.com.au/

    HTH

    What I’m on the hunt for now is food grade buckets (like the white commercial pickle buckets or the tall white ‘fishing’ buckets) for storage. Barrels I have for rainwater but they’re too wide for where I need to put them, for flour etc.

    Cheers

    #489321
    mistyhollowsmistyhollows
    Member

    Kristy, you can get food grade buckets at Bunnings if you can’t get them elsewhere. They’re usually sold out here though :huh:

    #489322
    FreddogFreddog
    Member

    I have some trouble understanding why anyone has to store more than one years supply of food as we should be living off the produce we are able to grow in our gardens and orchards.

    The idea of having so much money and space tied up with excessive food in storage and the worry that it will be alright to consume if ever the need arises when what we all really need is a garden that is able to provide us with our nutritional requirements.

    Items such as preserving jar lids we would never be able to make ourselves so if ever they became unavailable we would have to look at what we preserve and try and either grow the crops over an extended season or sun dry them so that we could have them out of season.

    If push ever came to shove, my store of vegetable seeds would be more valuable to me than any commercially prepared food items as when sown they would be able to sustain, on the arable ground we have, at least five times the two of us that normally live here. We know this because of the amount of produce we already grow to give away or market but that amount could be increased with the availability of more labour.

    #489323
    KristyMumTo4KristyMumTo4
    Member

    Freddog I see your point. I agree in the sense that there is only so much food you can store and after that, then what? At some point, stored food will run out/not be enough/not be safe to eat. Also to continue that even in the basic sense of bottling your own produce, would still require access and availability of ‘stuff’.

    For me, stored foods are there to get you through ‘transition’ and as backup should any of the other plans in place, fall through. So that rather than trying to perpetuate our ‘past’ (canned, prepacked, bulk) we look at working on and succeeding in a ‘new eating plan’ with what options we do have readily available.

    One of the blogs I was reading the other day they farmed rabbits for their meat. Which makes sense.

    Rather than thinking ‘how can I run a freezer so I can store a side of beef’ if it came to ‘TPHTF’… which is an attempt to maintain our ‘current’ approach, the transition would be to readily accesable smaller portions to suit a family, able to be killed and eaten fresh (cooked) without the need for storage, which rabbits do, that a large cow cannot.

    Same approach for how long the animal takes to reach edible age (cow vs rabbit again). Whether or not one agrees with rabbits farmed for meat (some do some don’t) it’s just an example of trying to adapt to a new approach to food, rather than struggling to maintain the ‘old’. If that makes sense.

    So there are the options of stored foods, kitchen garden, food forest, traditional bush foods (wild/semi-farmed), aqua culture, indoor hydroponics, poly tunnels, wild line fishing, seed saving (and more besides, of course) and very importantly, knowledge and the ability to adapt, and think.

    However, I also think that the idea that our gardens will always be there to rely on, is yet another assumption of ‘now’. We only have to look to nature wiping gardens off the homesteading (and commercial) map in times of flood, cyclone etc. I also am pretty sure that in a built up area, one house with a vege garden surrounded by many without, will not stand up long.

    So while I agree with your point about ‘how much is too much’ in terms of long term food storage, I also think that putting that much reliance on the garden has it’s challenges too (as I’m sure you know).

    One idea that I am hoping to work on is a variation I guess on the … is it called an atrium? So an enclosed lightfilled area within the design of the house itself, that can grow simple foods. Correctly done, this should survive even if a cyclone wipes the kitchen garden off my little plot. It’s of course subject to failure as well, but I really like the idea of the ‘not all the eggs in one basket’ (so that combined with some/all of the other options) and I think again, diversity proves it’s worth.

    of course we can prepare as best as possible but I think the thing that really gets to people, is that once they work out the limits of all the options – food storage, gardening, bush survival etc and possible reasons why those might fail – the simple truth becomes obvious – we are vulnerable like every other creature on the planet. We are more vulnerable than most of us like to think. Humans who have moved away from nature, and who have the means and opportunities to forget their place in nature, aren’t used to being vulnerable in this sense. It’s a whole new world.

    Some people live with that vulnerability every day but many more others haven’t experienced it… which is why I think the thought of it that, of being vulnerable like we really are, can be one underlying ‘motivator’ or fear – which people then deal with and react to differently.

    So kind of agreeing (with a ‘but’) and off on another tangent all at the same time. 🙂


    eta mistyhollows – I got 3 buckets 🙂 thanks for that. Not quite enough to store each bag but it’s ok because we do that much baking anyway that it won’t sit for long, what’s remaining in the bag. 🙂

    #489324
    fruitfulfruitful
    Member

    Gaganis Bros used to be in Thebarton I believe, it is now here: 9-13 Bacon Street

    Hindmarsh South Australia 5007

    08 8346 576 – you can see it as you drive along south road although I think you need to go down a back street to get to the parking.

    More info here:

    http://www.gaganisbros.com.au/

    #489325
    FreddogFreddog
    Member

    KristyMumTo4, I can see that we are probably looking at the same problem but from different perspectives.

    You say that stored foods are there to get you through ‘transition’ whereby I am saying that life/time is the transition and as each day goes by we should be saving/preparing for the next.

    Rabbits, I agree are an option. We have tried keeping them but you would be aware we have serious problems with myxamatosis and other deadly rabbit viruses that do a pretty good job of depleting them without strict control over mosquitos making them too costly in time and resources to keep.

    Wild rabbits are on the increase in our area and if crunch time came we would again cull these for our own consumption.

    At the present time we keep several varieties of poultry for eggs as well as meat but part of their diet is commercially grown grain that would/could become available and if that were to happen we would use what existing stock we had for our own consumption. We are in a position whereby we can grow some grain but nowhere the quantity that we presently use for ourselves. We can offset this shortfall by growing extra legumes to make into flour if we really got desperate but in reality we would rather use them in soups and stews to provide protein.

    It must be remembered that all animals require proper nutrition and if for any reason it cannot be provided from the available land at ones disposal then they cannot be considered to be sustainable.

    Ducks and geese don’t have the same dependance on grains as they are foragers but they do require good pastures and native grasses to survive.

    Consumption of red meats is way over what is necessary by most people as we only need two pieces of red meat a week, the size of the palms of our hands to provide us with the amount of vitamins needed for a healthy life. Many people keep a freezer just to store bits of dead animals which is a waste of resources.

    Over the past several decades I have tried many different non traditional vegetables, edible seeds and legumes, many of them I would not bother with again but there are several that succeeded with profitable results and these, with the so called traditional ones compliment our diet.

    Aqua culture, hydroponics and poly tunnels can only be successful if you have the time and resources to keep them maintained. I had a very successful hydroponic set-up for a number of years but dismantled it because it was taking more time to maintain it than growing the equivalent amount of vegetables in traditional garden beds.

    In the area we live the only issues we would have is bush fires and even then our main garden area would not be greatly effected. In saying that climate change could vastly alter the types and timing of crops we grow. Many vegetables can be stored in ground after they mature and many of these can be sown successionally so that with prudent planning more than one crop of some varieties can be ready for harvest at any one time allaying fears, to some degree, of a shortfall in food.

    I understand the fears that some people have in relation to having a garden in suburbia and in times of crisis have all and sundry take from that garden uninvited but with hard times effecting many areas in the world we also see a return to home vegetable gardens. Any crisis that were to befall us other than what Mother Nature dreams up would more than likely be in the news some months before it hit hard and that would/should be enough time for many who don’t quite think it’s time to kick into survival mode to pull finger and start being prepared themselves.

    One thing also to remember – If the system were to fail, it would become a full time job for at least one member of any family unit to grow and or supply the food for that family. Don’t believe me, try it yourself, without the use of electricity. It would also become a full time job for another member of that family unit to prepare, cook and store some of that food as well as do some of the other tasks that are necessary for a sustainable life.

    #489326
    KristyMumTo4KristyMumTo4
    Member

    KristyMumTo4, I can see that we are probably looking at the same problem but from different perspectives.

    You say that stored foods are there to get you through ‘transition’ whereby I am saying that life/time is the transition and as each day goes by we should be saving/preparing for the next.

    yes&No to the first para and yes to the second part of para two – I agree. In terms of ‘transition’, stored food represents a way to get from an ‘a’ to a ‘b’ in the shorter term where other preparations haven’t been (able to be) made. The also offer ‘something’ when a sudden change happens that we could not foresee, or haven’t had time/opportunity to prepare for.

    The second part about ‘life/time’ being the transition is spot on, from my pov anyway, but it’s not something that we can all get to right now. For example, I know where I am heading and where I want to be, I just can’t be there right now. So I do my best each day to get there, with stored food as my backup.

    I question whether we could get ‘there’, right now, often.

    So I don’t see it as an (a) have stored foods or (b) try and be as close to self suff as possible, rather I see it as option (c) ‘both of the above’. I’ll keep on my track to as close to self-reliance as I can (with hopefully some community as a companion), but in the meantime I have to have other options as my backup, for transition, if it gets here faster than I can prepare/changeover for. Does that make sense?

    One thing also to remember – If the system were to fail, it would become a full time job for at least one member of any family unit to grow and or supply the food for that family. Don’t believe me, try it yourself, without the use of electricity. It would also become a full time job for another member of that family unit to prepare, cook and store some of that food as well as do some of the other tasks that are necessary for a sustainable life.

    Absolutely. There’s no disbelief there from me at all, and it’s something I already think about – when we’re camping, when we’re at the beach, at home… you name it.

    Which is why for many people, ‘the change’ will more enable that. Most families, with the way thigns are set up now, can’t spare two adults for those tasks. The transition from now to that reality, is harder for some, easier for others.

    So I don’t think we’re necessarily on different tracks. I just think there’s quite a few roads leading to, and running parallel, and forking off from, that same track. Depending on circumstances as to which tracks people take. Heck, even different lanes within the same track if you like, corrugations and the like for some, smoother for others.

    I understand the fears that some people have in relation to having a garden in suburbia and in times of crisis have all and sundry take from that garden uninvited but with hard times effecting many areas in the world we also see a return to home vegetable gardens. Any crisis that were to befall us other than what Mother Nature dreams up would more than likely be in the news some months before it hit hard and that would/should be enough time for many who don’t quite think it’s time to kick into survival mode to pull finger and start being prepared themselves.

    I’m hopeful. I’ve thought about (but see, haven’t ‘done’ yet) asking the Council if they’ll set aside an area in our local park for a community garden. I’ve already thought of all their negative responses and reasons for saying no, but I haven’t tried. I’ve thought about offering spare seedlings to the neighbours, to encourage things in that direction, and to plant out the verge (there’s issues there). I really do hope it goes that way but I am not counting on it.

    In the area we live the only issues we would have is bush fires and even then our main garden area would not be greatly effected. In saying that climate change could vastly alter the types and timing of crops we grow

    yes to the climate change.

    As an aside, is your garden protected from animals so that after a bushfire when they have no feed, your garden won’t be it? Maybe you already do it for animal reasons but just a quick thought while I was typing.

    Then there’s other man-made issues like social conflict, war on one scale or another (including atomic) to really cover all the possibilities. So what I’m saying is we can’t all prepare now, for everything. So we prepare as best we can, we transition as best we can now, and have stored stuff as backup.

    I’ve asked a lot of the same questions – what, in the way we’re doing now, could we not do not too far down the track and what other options are there. Like I said, rather than ‘how do we replicate what we do now without mains power, water etc’ the question more I think goes ‘how to we make changes to our lifestyle now so we are not reliant on mains power/water etc’ (and expand that out to include most things you buy from the shop, factory made, commercially grown etc).

    I’ve tried to think of a reasonable way we could speed up our personal/household transition but I’m having a hard time getting there because factors other than my will, come in to play due to where we are in life now.

    (eta I posted in this thread initially to ask about buckets for my flour. I don’t see long, long term food storage as a sustainable/conclusive option, but I do short term store because my current circs tell me it’s prudent to do so).

    #489327
    FreddogFreddog
    Member

    KristyMumTo4,

    So I don’t see it as an (a) have stored foods or (b) try and be as close to self suff as possible, rather I see it as option (c) ‘both of the above’. I’ll keep on my track to as close to self-reliance as I can (with hopefully some community as a companion), but in the meantime I have to have other options as my backup, for transition, if it gets here faster than I can prepare/changeover for. Does that make sense?

    It does make sense and the idea of communities as companions is I believe the only way we would be able to survive. We do live in communities at the present time and the only thing that makes them work is the present system of government, if it fails then it will be up to the individual to become part of a community that has the same ideals as they have. It may not be easy to do this straight away as if the system did fail there would be all sorts of pressures that may not allow individuals to do their own thing.

    I’m hopeful. I’ve thought about (but see, haven’t ‘done’ yet) asking the Council if they’ll set aside an area in our local park for a community garden. I’ve already thought of all their negative responses and reasons for saying no, but I haven’t tried. I’ve thought about offering spare seedlings to the neighbours, to encourage things in that direction, and to plant out the verge (there’s issues there). I really do hope it goes that way but I am not counting on it.

    Community gardens are getting established in many areas and I am sure that if you were to ask your council or shire about them they would have information. I am a member of a community garden and it is working well.

    As an aside, is your garden protected from animals so that after a bushfire when they have no feed, your garden won’t be it? Maybe you already do it for animal reasons but just a quick thought while I was typing.

    We have a rabbit and kangaroo fence around our garden areas and around the poultry we have a 1.6 metre fox proof fence with a hot wire on it. We also have Fox Lights and a good dog. I also bait foxes periodically as I believe that by just deterring them from coming onto our place only drives them onto someone else’s and causes them more grief.

    Then there’s other man-made issues like social conflict, war on one scale or another (including atomic) to really cover all the possibilities. So what I’m saying is we can’t all prepare now, for everything. So we prepare as best we can, we transition as best we can now, and have stored stuff as backup.

    I’ve asked a lot of the same questions – what, in the way we’re doing now, could we not do not too far down the track and what other options are there. Like I said, rather than ‘how do we replicate what we do now without mains power, water etc’ the question more I think goes ‘how to we make changes to our lifestyle now so we are not reliant on mains power/water etc’ (and expand that out to include most things you buy from the shop, factory made, commercially grown etc).

    I’ve tried to think of a reasonable way we could speed up our personal/household transition but I’m having a hard time getting there because factors other than my will, come in to play due to where we are in life now.

    (eta I posted in this thread initially to ask about buckets for my flour. I don’t see long, long term food storage as a sustainable/conclusive option, but I do short term store because my current circs tell me it’s prudent to do so).

    Never try to replicate what you do now with what you would do without electricity. Learn to look outside the square. We can all live without electricity and our forefathers did it for thousands of years and were still able to colonise the planet.

    Our lifestyle allows us to be virtually fully prepared at any given time and it must be remembered that if a serious problem were to arise we would have days, weeks and possibly some months of warning which would be enough time for anyone serious about transition/survival to get extra supplies of what they deem as necessary items into their stock.

    Your bit about having buckets for your flour is something we would never do. Never save flour, store wheat from a reputable grower that has not had any chemicals (insecticides or fungicides) added while it has been in storage and get yourself a grain mill. Wheat if stored sensibly will keep for many years whereas flour, particularly that from the supermarket has a good chance of being a bit iffy.

    If you are serious about surviving any situation you should be living where you believe you have a good chance of doing so. We purchased our property some years ago and never thought about floods, civil unrest or any other problems we may encounter in our lifetime but as luck would have it our property has turned out to be ideal. We have good soil, adequate water, some distance from the nearest town and have enough distance between our neighbours to be comfortable.

    #489328
    KristyMumTo4KristyMumTo4
    Member

    It does make sense and the idea of communities as companions is I believe the only way we would be able to survive. We do live in communities at the present time and the only thing that makes them work is the present system of government, if it fails then it will be up to the individual to become part of a community that has the same ideals as they have. It may not be easy to do this straight away as if the system did fail there would be all sorts of pressures that may not allow individuals to do their own thing.

    agreed, which is exactly why we’re aiming for:

    If you are serious about surviving any situation you should be living where you believe you have a good chance of doing so. We purchased our property some years ago and never thought about floods, civil unrest or any other problems we may encounter in our lifetime but as luck would have it our property has turned out to be ideal. We have good soil, adequate water, some distance from the nearest town and have enough distance between our neighbours to be comfortable.

    this lol. We are working towards it and it’s going to be slower than we would like but we have to be patient because we don’t really have any other option. The time we spend being patient will be used productively – researching, practicing etc

    Your bit about having buckets for your flour is something we would never do. Never save flour, store wheat from a reputable grower that has not had any chemicals (insecticides or fungicides) added while it has been in storage and get yourself a grain mill. Wheat if stored sensibly will keep for many years whereas flour, particularly that from the supermarket has a good chance of being a bit iffy.

    What I mean is the flour in buckets is only for about a month’s use 🙂 As we do lots of baking – I spend about 4 hours baking just on Tuesdays so it’s not a ‘storage’ for survival, rather storage to not have lots of smaller bags of flour iykwim. Two buckets roughly fits the 25kg bags we get from the bulk place.

    I’d like to look at the mill and grain (and had read similar to what you’re saying about storing wheat), it’s just not something I can fit in at the moment.

    Glad to hear your place is sorted in terms of protection from unwanted animals

    …and you’re right re community garden… I guess I just need to know if there’s enough of a community here to support it. Heck, I wouldn’t mind doing the majority of the work the first however long, until more people come on board.

    Never try to replicate what you do now with what you would do without electricity. Learn to look outside the square. We can all live without electricity and our forefathers did it for thousands of years and were still able to colonise the planet.

    completely agreed.

    #489329
    FreddogFreddog
    Member

    Sorry about the following as it may well go over some of what I/we have already discussed. I have a slightly shorter version of this on another website in the US and I believe some of the information in it made them seriously think about where they get some of their long term storage products from.

    We do not keep a supply of flour but grind the grain whenever we need to, about once every week to ten days.

    My wife bakes the bread and other items from the freshly made flour as flour loses some of the nutritional advantages if stored.

    The storage of flour can also create problems not found when storing wheat and it is easier to store raw grains than flour. It is interesting to note that there have been many instances where flour has been purchased and kept in the container it was sold in for several months and evidence of insect contamination has been found. Insect eggs are so small that during milling some of these can pass through the process undamaged to cause problems at a later date.

    Whole ground grain is far more nutritious than the cheap white flour and much of the so called whole meal flour that is commercially produced.

    When the grain is taken to the silos after harvest it is classified according to the amount of protein, moisture, contamination, variety and possibly other tests depending on what it is to be used for.

    As the wheat is unloaded at the silos it is treated with insecticides and also in some areas with fungicides.

    H1, H2 and APW are the milling grades and ASW and below are classified as feed.

    So the baker wants a thousand tonnes of grain to convert to flour to make bread from. Does he purchase the top quality grain? Of course not, he buys the cheapest blend of the different grades he can get away with and with that cheap blend he is still able to bake a marketable bread.

    Interesting to note that dairy farmers and poultry producers are prepared to spend their money purchasing the milling quality wheat as it is the high level of protein they want as it makes it better value for money.

    There are hard wheats and soft wheats. Hard wheats are for making bread and biscuits while the soft wheats are used for pasta among other things.

    The farmer gets about $256.00 per tonne for H1. Bio dynamically produced grain sells for about $450.00 per tonne and is sold to diary farmers who produce bio dynamic milk.

    Do your homework, buy good quality grain from a reputable supplier/grower, grind it yourself and bake your own goodies and eliminate much of the contamination you are probably now feeding your children.

    If you are going to get a grinder make sure it uses stones and not an impact grinder such a a Whisper Mill.

    Have a look at http://www.allotment.org.uk/allotment_foods/bread-making/chorleywood-bread-process.php.

    I remember when the Chorleywood process was adopted as all of the smaller rural based stone mills closed down as the bakers realised there was a cheaper and quicker way to make bread, more profit and to hell with the health of the people who ate it..

    #489330
    goodfoodgoodfood
    Member

    I get my all organic, Gluten free products and all food beverages from goodfoodwarehouse.The specialty of their food is freshness and superb quality..www.goodfoodwarehouse.com.au

    #489331
    FreddogFreddog
    Member

    goodfood,

    Is your post an advertisement for the Good Food Warehouse because if it is I would like to know how you can be sure that what it says on the labels of the containers of the food they stock is what is actually in the containers.

    #489332
    RobyneRobyne
    Member

    I shop at Ganganis in Hindmarsh. Thebarton is across the road so its still around the same area. For those of you in Adelaide go down Port Road till you come to the Brewery and the road that runs between the Entertainment Center and Channel 7 and the river that has the Christmas decorations. It used to be called River rd when I worked down there in the 70s Bacon street is the last street before you hit South Road. I think you go around 2-3 roundabouts. The building is a grotty looking building on the outside and the car park is behind a wire fence. Inside is a factory style of shop but its cheaper than the Supermarkets. I also shop at Cash and Carry at GLenelg and there is one on the way to Pooraka area.

    I found the Mylar bags are fine for large amounts I put dog biscuits and rice in them and flour and wheat. But for the smaller stuff I use my food sealer. I bought mine off of Deals Direct for $49 about 6 years ago. I just bought 6 bags for it from Ebay for $30. I put enough food in a bag and seal and vacuum them so they are air tight.

    I find they take up very little room and you seem to get quite a lot in a 55 litre container. I reuse the bags over and over.

    My Food dryer is a Fowlers I have had for years, my friend but hers from Deals Direct for under $80. I have 2 trays used only for onions and garlic as the taste effects the fruit if used.

Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 48 total)
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.