Aussies Living Simply

Living now like the past for the future.

Home Forums SUSTAINABLE COMMUNITIES Peak Oil – where are we headed? Living now like the past for the future.

Viewing 15 posts - 46 through 60 (of 64 total)
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  • #464511
    JanineJanine
    Member

    Knowing the value of weeds and bush tucker as Greth pointed out is worth more than gold, you look at the survivors of wars who lived off weeds growing in bombed cities, weeds became so valuable that women prostitued themselves for them. Knowledge is power.

    #464512
    GrethGreth
    Member

    My point if there really was one, is that one can have a happy and productive life without electricity, or cars, or even believe it or not mobile phones. Food is not that scarce, depending on what you are prepared to eat.

    As for a slow and painful death, I have been extremely close to it, well, I tried all the slow and painful bits without actually dying, tho the doctors were standing around tossing coins I think. As for pain management, I can promise you it doesnt always work. I suppose it just doesnt scare me as much since then.

    As for lunatics with guns, well I suppose they can happen anytime, but they would be more likely to raid warehouses and the kitchens at parliament house than my little veggie patch. If they did turn up, I would be happy to hand over my wheelbarrow of edibles, even toss in some highly toxic bits for dessert!

    #464513
    Shangri LaShangri La
    Member

    I find these PO threads quite interesting but i am curious about peoples thoughts on just when the ‘WTSHTF’ moment will come. It seems as though some people think it’s imminent, are others just hoping so – so that they can say ‘Told you so’. I have no opinions either way; the only thing I’m sure about is that most humans are living an unsustainable life and too many don’t give it a second thought. I also agree that that supermarket shelves can empty very quickly – the day before good friday shows that and that’s only a reaction to shops shutting for one day!!

    #464514
    weaverweaver
    Member

    Community is something we need to be building now if you havent already started. You cant expect a group of people living close together to form a community when disaster hits but you could expect an enmeshed community to have some resilience and spirit under the same circumstances.

    #464515
    harooneyharooney
    Member

    I think that seeing this is under the peak oil banner, this is what we are expecting to cause imminent upset to life as most people in Australia know it.. I also think that people are going to expect the government to come out and save them with food handouts etc. we have all seen just how well distribution of that goes down when people are desperate and corrupt. Having your own supply to fall back on will cut out the uncertainty of relief getting through. I think that many people will also congregate in food camps where supplies are distributed as they will have no idea how to find food if they can’t pick it off a supermarket shelf and will be in a Nanny state, expecting to have handouts and be looked after. I also think that building a house that looks like fort knox is painting a big target, look at us, we have something you want kind of thing.

    I also think that even if you have a big supply or “hoard” (which is likely to be declared illegal) it will possibly be confiscated anyway. It is hard to confiscate what you have in the ground and the ability to hunt and gather.

    I think it will be a series of crisis over time and eventual collapse of systems. Whether new systems will be able to cover the basics, will determine how bad it gets.

    #464516
    JanineJanine
    Member

    I guess at the end of the day it matters how slowly Po happens. If it happens over night then TSWHTF, if it happens over a decade then civilisation will adjust, life will not be as wel know it now, but we will adjust.

    I also wonder if hoarding is just putting off the enevitable, it is one thing to have a good stock of seeds but if you have barrels of petrol lying around which most probably will oxidise before PO hits unless you rotate your supply are you making it worse for yourself?

    #464517
    DB346DB346
    Member

    Interesting topic. I believe that the ‘level’ will determine the response. If things are very bad and desperate already, then I think you can assume that it did not happen overnight. How long does it take to get to this point? I think about 4-6 weeks and we would see a dire situation in Aust.

    I have some ‘trust’ in humanity, but this is limited. If and when society goes down hill, I for one will initially be sharing my knowledge and some food resources with friends, community and of course extended family. If and when things get dire, is when I would ‘shut up shop’ and try and isolate my family. Recent disasters in the Western World have served as a reasonable example of what could be expected, and it is not pretty!

    If things do get that bad, unfortunately I believe ‘people’ simply will react to keep them and their family alive. If this means taking from you by force, then it will happen. If it did come to this, then a hard decision needs to be made. Defend what you have or let it go? This is where isolation is handy, and helps make this decision for you.

    I am trying to locate an article I read on the WWW about 18mths ago concerning Hurricane Katrina. If I remember it correctly, a suburb actually was a “Transition Town” or about to become one (I will try and find it) and unfortunately, did not fare any better than anybody else.

    With regard to the third world, this is a sad but true fact. If TSDHTF then I think it will be a year or two before Australia is at the level.

    Lets hope that it does not come to this.

    Anyhow, that is my 2 cents worth.

    #464518
    harooneyharooney
    Member

    Interesting clip from SBS world news on this website. I’m not sure how old it is but must be reasonably current.

    https://herbsarespecial.com.au/self-sufficiency.html

    A govt food security report on those who already struggle to put enough food on the table in SA:

    http://www.health.sa.gov.au/pros/portals/0/pres-food-insecurity-SA04.pdf

    So around 7% of the Sa population would be in dire straits pretty quickly if there was a crisis.

    #464519
    Michael1973Michael1973
    Member

    I once heard a very good story about a frog. If you put it in a pot of cold water and slowly heat it up it will sit there until it boils to death whereas if you drop it into boiling water it would jump out straight away.

    I try to be as well setup as i can be while flying under the radar. If TSHTF then my wife and i can manage for a time until things settle down.

    I recommend an extremely good book called deep winter by a chap named Tom Sherry. Have a look at his blog where he is more than happy to send people a free pdf of any of his books, or drop him an email at deepwinter2007@comcast.net. He is a nice bloke who is more than happy to send out free copies of the books. I tried buying them but they are about $60 on Amazon so free is better :D:D

    They are about an ordinary family who are a bit wiser than than the rest coping in a disaster situation followed by a general society collapse. they arnt fringe or loony in the writing style just good common sense stuff. I actually found myself reading the books a second time with a notebook to take notes.

    I think the most likely situation here in Aus would be some form of large natural disaster followed by an economic crunch. When the banks close the doors is when i’ll batten down the hatches. I dont think it will come to shooting people climbing over the fence but starving people are want to do strange things. if people dont see you as a target you wont be one.

    #464520
    kerripkerrip
    Member

    Michael, I loved your story about the frog and appreciate your advice. I’ll check out Tom Sherry and read some of his books for free.

    ” if people dont see you as a target you wont be one.” An excellent point.

    #464521
    harooneyharooney
    Member

    I hope Tom doesn’t mind a big rush on his books. There are 3 in the series by the looks, and the last one is in chapters on his blog.

    #464522
    harooneyharooney
    Member

    I hope Tom doesn’t mind a big rush on his books. There are 3 in the series by the looks, and the last one is in chapters on his blog.

    Thanks for the tip!

    #464523
    roadwarriorroadwarrior
    Member

    Greth wrote:

    My point if there really was one, is that one can have a happy and productive life without electricity, or cars, or even believe it or not mobile phones. Food is not that scarce, depending on what you are prepared to eat.

    This is Post-Peak Oil Myth #4. For starters, 1/3 of the world’s population lives like crap. Their lives are terrible, painful, and a constant daily struggle to stay alive and put food on the table. They don’t have proper health care, their women and babies die at birth, there are tribal/clan wars, famine, disease, civil wars, and that’s on a good day when the sun is shining.

    I for one don’t want those things, and I know for a fact that most of the western world won’t stand for a reduction in quality of life either. Look at the riots in Greece and Thialand as a perfect current example.

    Societies don’t transition well when going from a good lifestyle to a bad one. Societies that are already living primative will still feel the effects of peak oil too; a lot of the world lives off charity that’s going to stop. Overall though they have the knowledge and experience to survival low-tech, but they have half the lifespan we do.

    We don’t have the knowledge or experience, at least not as a whole. A lot of people would rather starve than eat someting outside a fast food restaurant. Those people won’t grow food themselves. They will come and try to take yours. The Chile Earthquake is a good example, with gangs roaming through the neigbourhoods looting and stealing from occupied houses. It was only those who had organised and armed themselves that were able to keep the mobs away.

    #464524
    Michael1973Michael1973
    Member

    With the Tom Sherry books make sure you start at ‘Deep Winter’. They run in sequence following the life and times of a family. If you jump in the middle very little will make sense. Enjoy them its the right time of year to be reading deep winter. 😆

    #464525
    DB346DB346
    Member

    I could not find that old article I read about Hurricane Katrina and the effects on the communities. Wish I had printed it out…:rol::rol:

    Some of the responses by the ‘local’ community to natural disasters around the world are a real eye opener. There are both good and bad examples, but the good are harder to find!

    Dependant on where you live (city or country) would appear to determine if it is a good or bad experience. The vast majority of anti social, mob mentality, or even worse situations occur in cities. Much harder to find research material on the bad side of a disaster in a country environment (not to say it did not happen).

    I think where you live is one of the most important factors in considering your future. This is fairly clear if you do your research.

    My two cents worth.

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