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Immediate Threat – Oil Shockwave Scenario (Part 2)

Home Forums SUSTAINABLE COMMUNITIES Peak Oil – where are we headed? Immediate Threat – Oil Shockwave Scenario (Part 2)

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 82 total)
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  • #252980
    Lady BeeLady Bee
    Keymaster
    #474267
    roadwarriorroadwarrior
    Member

    Ggang wrote:

    the US is only withdrawing “combat” troops – its all a bit of a con but there will still be plenty of US troops left there to control that oil

    Yes but they need those combat troops to hold onto the country. If they leave there’s not enough left to stop a civil war.

    #474268
    GrethGreth
    Member

    Well let em have a civil war if they want one, sheesh, this is a free world.

    Im sure I can find a spare room for the women and kids who don’t like a civil war.

    #474269
    grumpy3grumpy3
    Member

    Checking the net on survivalism in the US it looks like just about every man and his dog are getting prepared. They seem to be taking it quite seriously and not all are refering to war but to things of nature as well. I notice they are saying at least 12 months supply of food etc. I noticed one family has five years supply of wood stored for the winters. Thats a lot of wood.

    Makes me wonder how many Aussies are prepared for a natural desaster let alone anything like a war. How many would have a years supply of food let alone fuel and other goods. May have to really have a look at the supplies.

    #474270
    busylizziebusylizzie
    Participant

    Your so right grumpy, the US are really full-on with their preps, there are so many videos on You-tube showing what they are doing, its endless. (and interesting)

    We purchased a woodsplitter late last year to help with the stockpiling of our wood, we have a wood heater that we dont use as much as we use to since we put in a reverse cycle. Our intentions are to get a wet-back slow combustion stove in the near future, so the idea was to start getting the wood stored, 😐 plans dont always work out as you want, we are nearly out of cut wood for this Winter. :tdown: its been so cold and something else always needs doing so things get put off. DH has some holidays soon, I think we will start the wood stockpiling then. Oh wouldnt it be nice to have five years worth.

    #474271
    grumpy3grumpy3
    Member

    I was talking about the five year supply with my son and I think we would have to do something about the white ant problem. Other wise there might not be much left in five years. Probable need a shed with a concrete floor to stack it that way it would be dry and in good condition. We have an older crown combustion stove in very good condition. We have found it the best thing we got because during winter the whole house in warm and we get hot water as well. I got it second hand for $250 and it does not even have any chips on the enamel but does need a new temp gauge for the oven.

    For anyone thats has the go there seems to be so much dead wood laying around that it would be easy to get five years supply in no time at all. I have been getting small iron barks that have died and they burn very well.

    I have been also playing with the idea of making a heater box around the base of the chimney and having fan forced air through the house if we ever need it. Dreaming I guess :).

    #474272
    BootstrapperBootstrapper
    Member

    To be prepared for the drop, one must be willing to look into the abyss. Even without physical preparations, just having a plan of action puts you light years ahead of all those who prefer to stick their heads in the sand (and particularly those whose heads are firmly up their fundamental orifi). Those who can’t admit there’s a problem, will become the casualties of natural selection.

    #474273
    GrethGreth
    Member

    Oh, well, wood is fine, theres far more surplus in our paddocks than we ever use, and more trees regenerating all the time.

    I think the most useful tool is knowledge. If you know how to use the available resources, you are streets ahead of those who look at the same materials and see only junk.

    #474274
    grumpy3grumpy3
    Member

    Greth wrote:

    Oh, well, wood is fine, theres far more surplus in our paddocks than we ever use, and more trees regenerating all the time.

    I think the most useful tool is knowledge. If you know how to use the available resources, you are streets ahead of those who look at the same materials and see only junk.

    Yep. What is one mans junk is valuable spare parts and usefull material to another. When you drive around the farming areas and see the amount of dead timber on the ground you can only think what a waste. It may not always be the best fire wood but if it burns its ok.

    #474275
    GrethGreth
    Member

    That is all habitat for animals, grumpy, don’t mind leaving some stuff around for the critters. Our neighbour is a traditional sheep farmer, he piles up all the dead wood and burns it to give more room for sheep. That is what I call waste, noone gets to use it, not even a lizard. He doesn’t need the extra 50 cents profit a year from the space anyway.

    #474276
    RobyneRobyne
    Member

    Our rain water tank holds 2 tons of wood so 3 large rain water tanks would hold about 6 tons and if you are careful it should last a few years. We start our fire around 4 oclock and burn till about 10 and it goes out but keeps the house warm. A few days when that wind was blowing it was on earlier. If we had a wood stove in here I wouldn’t burn the combustion as I think it would be too hot.

    I think we should be giving each other more ideas on stock piling and how we are going to store it.:shrug: If you buy a years supply you would need a good solid room to store it all in.

    I don’t have anything like that here. Mine is mainly under the beds and in a couple of cupboards. I can’t leave anything in the sheds as the mice get to them. Plus things tend to rust near the ocean.

    A friends mother won a years supply of groceries and before she could eat it it either had gone off or weevils had gotten into it. I think the weevils came with the food.:shrug:

    #474277
    busylizziebusylizzie
    Participant

    Good point Robyne. Storing our supplies correctly is always on my mind. I am lucky to have somewhere that is not in the house to store my stockpile, but what I have been looking into is the Mylar bags, just the smaller ones with oxygen absorbers (has anyone used this system?) We have somewhere to purchase the smaller barrels to then put the Mylar bags into. The US seems to love this way of storing foods, so there is alot of info about it.

    #474278
    dixiebelledixiebelle
    Member

    A friends mother won a years supply of groceries

    Oh, I always thought with those sort of competitions, that you’d get vouchers or credit at the supermarket, to go get what you need each week or fortnight. How disappointing for her…

    I find stockpiling a worrying thing (for want of a better term)… I want to have enough supplies to last us several weeks, for short term emergencies, but cannot see my family having the space, or inclination to have years & years worth of anything, and the storage and maintenance required for it. I guess I just don’t have the time for doing major stockpiling, because I am so busy building up our productive garden, getting chickens, and working on skills/ knowledge/ portable materials & how we can provide for ourselves, wherever we are… like if we had to leave our stockpile behind. I think having 5 years worth of food/ gear etc., it’s a big investment to make (in time, money, motivation), only to find you can’t stay in your home, or there is an emergency (fire/ flood/ cyclone) that destroys it. :shrug:

    Maybe others either have their gardens/ livestock/ energy needs covered, so have time to think about major stockpiling issues OR have no way to do any gardening etc., so HAVE to rely on major stockpiling.

    Urgh, too much thinking for a Sunday morning! Must go out and make potato patch!

    #474279
    GrethGreth
    Member

    I think its better to spend what money you have on improving your fresh food supply, rather than saving buckets of instant mashed potato!

    If there is no particular crisis, your investment still comes good as you will have stuff to eat, spend less at the stupidmarket! Or trade and swap with friends for stuff you aren’t so good at providing.

    Wood is a resource we will always have. Wood+water+ingenuity = steam power. + an electronically minded hubby = steam generator and electrical power.

    Storing a lot of food is an expensive and time consuming task, and the benefits are only in the maybe, one day, category.

    #474280
    grumpy3grumpy3
    Member

    I for one would not think of 5 years supply. Six months to a years supply is a lot and even that takes time and effort to manage. I would think the twelve months is good plus all the fresh stuff you can grow. Becoming better in the garden is always a good way to go and the store can be there for any emergency. But then just having the stock and replacing it when you do go shoping is good idea. That way you have it turning over all the time just like a big pantry.

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