Aussies Living Simply

Icy poles!

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  • #257495
    Rommie
    Member

    For those who make their own icy poles – do you follow any particular recipes or just put things into moulds with minimum preparation?

    I recently got one of those Zoku QuickPop makers – one of those “looks like a good idea but do I really need one?” gadgets. (I succumbed when I was able to source one at a decent discount). I figured it would be a quick way to use up leftover juices, yoghurts etc without having to wait ages to freeze them (though the unit itself has to be frozen for 24 hours).

    I tried my first today and in about 10 minutes had a lovely orange-juice icy pole 🙂 I’m quite sure that most things you can freeze in conventional icy pole moulds will work in the QuickPop maker.

    (Am I the only one annoyed by the increasing prevalence of the word “popsicle”? They’ll always be “icy poles” to me…)

    #529864
    Thisildo
    Participant

    I use an “Icy Pole Maker” that cost a few $$ from Aldi.

    I use Chocolate milk, crushed strawberries,fruit juice and anything else that is available and suitable. The grandkids love them.

    #529865
    froot_loopz
    Member

    I also use milo, and sell them at school

    I use disposable cups with slotted lids and stick a popstick in them

    #529866
    froot_loopz
    Member

    must remember to test run an easi yo pack to freeze as icy poles

    #529867
    calliecat
    Participant

    I’ve got some centuries old tupperware icy pole molds, I usually just use fruit juice, and fruit,

    have also made some home made yogo and frozen that

    #529868
    Robyne
    Member

    I also have the old fashioned Tupperware icy poles set plus

    I bought a couple from a cheap shop that have straws on the sides so Grandkids can suck up the melted stuff

    I use all the left over yoghurt fruit juice and if I have any left over fruit I blend it and freeze it.

    I have also put smarties in the mix as a treat.

    I was looking at the ice block makers in Home art but I am trying not to buy much electrical products

    I did wonder how they worked so fast.

    River Cottage has good recipes for Icy Poles

    #529869
    Bobbee
    Member

    Hi Rommie, yep they will always be icy poles to me. There’s nothing wrong with good old Aussie lingo I reckon. :tup:

    #529870
    calliecat
    Participant

    they will always be icy poles to me as well, up here they call then ice blocks

    #529871
    Rommie
    Member

    Robyne post=351756 wrote:

    I was looking at the ice block makers in Home art but I am trying not to buy much electrical products

    I did wonder how they worked so fast.

    If you mean the Zoku ones, they actually don’t use any electricity. Basically it’s just a metal and plastic mould filled with some kind of refrigerant liquid. You just keep it in the freezer – it has to be frozen for 24 hours before first use – and take it out when you want to make your icy poles. Put in the stick, pour the ingredients and watch it freeze before your eyes! The instructions say you can make two to three batches before you need to re-freeze the unit (I haven’t tried this yet).

    #529872
    Rebecca
    Member

    Rommie post=351747 wrote: (Am I the only one annoyed by the increasing prevalence of the word “popsicle”? They’ll always be “icy poles” to me…)

    I feel the same way about ‘cookie’. It’s a biscuit, darn it! :angry:

    Melons whizzed in a food processor make lovely iceblock bases, especially if you layer it with yoghurt. Or if I’m feeling particularly lazy I’ll use fruit pulp from the supermarket.

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