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How much space for the self sufficient vegetable garden?

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  • #250526
    alokinalokin
    Member

    We will finally be moving on half an acre and I try to put the elements together. (unfortunately, I cannot browse long on the forum because of a very limited internet time).

    I want to be self sufficient in Veggies (family of four) including things like carrots, onions and potatos. What would you think ios enopugh space? We might eat lots of potatoes as homegrown are much better. How about 200 sqm? And for the perennial like asparagus, rhubarb artichocke etc.?

    And a good sized berry garden?

    We wuill be in the upper mountains and the soil seems to be sandy.

    #443876
    porgeyporgey
    Member

    alokin, 200 square meters is oodles of space, you can grow half a tonne of vegies in 42 square meters of ground in one year. You are in a great situation as you have lots of space compared to some people and with a Mountain climate you will still get good summer heat but just as importantly a winter chill for plants, such as apples, to do there thing. I suggest that you buy or borrow The Australian Vegetable Garden book by Clive Blazey of The Diggers Club as it is jammed full of really good growing and self sufficiency tips. Also Woodbridge Fruit Trees in Tassie have great Apples and other fruit trees on dwarfing rootstock suited for the KNNN method of espaliering in smallish spaces. If you have sandy soil grow lots of green manures and add as much compost and cow manure as you can to get it grooving. Good luck and enjoy the magic of growing your own. Cheers porgey.

    #443877
    darlsdarls
    Member

    Congrats on moving…

    Like Porgey says, 200 sqm is heaps of space. There are always many ways of growing stuff anyway – bags, vertical, mixed, etc. Jackie French’s “Backyard Self-Sufficiency” is another great book if you want a simple and quick intrody to the whole shebang.

    How about using wicking beds, while you work on the soil to be more friable? Look for Scarecrow’s for wicking bed construction. Actually do go to her site for the gardening guidance as she got the ‘beginner gardener series’ going there that could help you alot.

    Depends on type of fence, if they’re wire ones, then grow berries along the fence. Just need to check the soil’s ph.

    Good luck and keep us posted on how you’re going with the moving and starting on your own self-sufficiency journey.

    Cheers! :hug:

    #443878
    garden_girlgarden_girl
    Member

    I would also suggest seeing if you could get your hands on a couple of the Gardening Australia DVD’s. There are two that feature Peter Cundell “Patch from Scratch” and “A Year in the Patch” or (or something similar) You might find them usefull in planning you planting space, especially the “Patch from Scratch” this also explains the bed rotation method really simply which I found helpful.

    You could perhaps also try and have a look at two of the John Seymour books. “The New Complete Gude to Self-Sufficiency” gives suggested ways to plan out your land depending on whether you have a small couryard up to 5acres. And then there is his “Self-Sufficient Gardener” which focuses on the gardening aspect and leaves out other things like animals which are covered in the first one I mentioned.

    Also some of the permaculture books might be useful, personally I like Rosemary Morrow’s “Earth User’s Guide to Permaculture”, but there are lots of other good ones.

    Good Luck. I would love to be able to plan out a new garden from scratch.

    #443879
    alokinalokin
    Member

    Thanks for the answers,

    my last veggie garden was about 40 sqm. And you can grow heaps of stuff there but you will certainly not be able to grow all your potatoes there.

    It’s more about the right layout, mean how much for the veggies, how much for the orchard and how much for the goats.

    If one would like to be as self sufficient as possible, and would grow as well the basics there, maybe a bit of corn too, then how much would yu need? How much would one put away for stables like spuds? And one needs a fair bit of onions as well.

    #443880
    Lyn BagnallLyn Bagnall
    Member

    alokin wrote:

    I want to be self sufficient in Veggies (family of four) including things like carrots, onions and potatos. What would you think ios enopugh space? We might eat lots of potatoes as homegrown are much better. How about 200 sqm? And for the perennial like asparagus, rhubarb artichocke etc.?

    And a good sized berry garden?

    Alokin, it has been calculated that 9 square metres of bed surface will provide one person with vegetables each year. Multiply that by the number of people you want to feed, add space for pathways, fruit trees and vines, and other fairly permanent beds such as asparagus, plus areas for worm farm and compost making and you can work out how much space you need. I personally think you might be cutting it a bit fine with nine square metres as a decent crop rotation is necessary for soil health, but even if you are more generous per person, you should easily be able to do it within 200 square metres. Depending on the layout too, you may be able to save space by espaliering fruit trees. 🙂

    #443881
    virgillvirgill
    Member

    I have a 10mtr by 5mtr vegie patch (divided into 9 beds – 1 being for a permanent bed for rasberries, asparagus & rhubarb plants). And I found it was not big enough, so we are just putting in a second patch which is slightly smaller in size (but divided up into 4 beds only). I found that yes you could get a decent feed, but as we want to be able to freeze / preserve as well (for out of season times) we need the bigger area. And potatoes, a herb garden and fruit/nut trees are in a separate place as well, but as the garden is quite young (fruit & nut trees only went in about 12 months ago) we are still having to buy produce in. We live near the Grampians (Victoria), so we are considering a greenhouse for next year as the frosts were quite costly this year.

    #443882
    alokinalokin
    Member

    I read a figure that if you want to grow potatoes for a family of four you will need 80 sqm alone ( maybe depends how muich potatoes you eat). And the usual vegetables you should come by with 60 sqm or 40 but there are still the onions missing znd you need heaps of them. And the dry beans….

    #443883

    Lyn Bagnall wrote:

    alokin wrote:

    I want to be self sufficient in Veggies (family of four) including things like carrots, onions and potatos. What would you think ios enopugh space? We might eat lots of potatoes as homegrown are much better. How about 200 sqm? And for the perennial like asparagus, rhubarb artichocke etc.?

    And a good sized berry garden?

    Alokin, it has been calculated that 9 square metres of bed surface will provide one person with vegetables each year. Multiply that by the number of people you want to feed, add space for pathways, fruit trees and vines, and other fairly permanent beds such as asparagus, plus areas for worm farm and compost making and you can work out how much space you need. I personally think you might be cutting it a bit fine with nine square metres as a decent crop rotation is necessary for soil health, but even if you are more generous per person, you should easily be able to do it within 200 square metres. Depending on the layout too, you may be able to save space by espaliering fruit trees. 🙂

    I like the look of that:tup:

    Gives me something to work towards 😆

    Great info there:clap:

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