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how are you responding to peak oil?

Home Forums SUSTAINABLE COMMUNITIES Peak Oil – where are we headed? how are you responding to peak oil?

Viewing 15 posts - 76 through 90 (of 112 total)
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  • #493345
    roadwarriorroadwarrior
    Member

    My short term preps are trying to loose 15kg and build up my strength. So far since christmas I’ve lost 10kg, but these last 5 are proving difficult. I might start up an alternate thread to detail my diet.

    I’m trying to do this mainly through controlled energy intake and low impact exercise, although if you asked my muscles right now they wouldn’t agree with low impact. A day of rest is required to recover I think.

    First step: stay employed and get healthy.

    #493346
    roadwarriorroadwarrior
    Member

    …that includes mental health as well, eh Dennis? :silly:

    #493347
    DennisDennis
    Member

    RW. New thread on weight loss great idea. RW the new Jenny Craig weight loss no frills boot camp.

    #493348
    nessienoonessienoo
    Member

    Forget trying to figure out how to run your car. You’ve got to work out how to feed yourself without it, including without welfare/pension or a job.

    I agree. That’s our focus for living in the world of post-peak oil.

    My husband (who has in the past needed close supervision when mowing because he’ll mow anything green including my plants!:ohmy:) is now taking an interest in growing food plants and permaculture principles. :cheer:

    We live in Ipswich but our local area is almost like a village in that we have all of the essential services within a kilometre of our house and my husband works 2 blocks away. I’m the silly duffer who commutes into Brisbane but at least I can catch the train.:S

    So we’re in a good spot here for now.

    #493349
    nessienoonessienoo
    Member

    dianne post=308498 wrote: :S althought all this talk of how to make our own oil ect is really interseting, do you not think it would be a better idea to be finding better ways of doing without so mush oil? if we could find more effectint ways and cut down then we would not need to make so much oil in the first place, and then the smaller amounts that are needed would be easyer to obtain/make. ?

    I agree with you completely, Dianne! 🙂

    That’s what I’ve been focussing on but habits take a while to change. I could ride or ‘scoot’ to the shops that are just a few blocks away but I’m finding that (at the moment), I only think of that once I’m parking the car at the supermarket. :S Oh well, I’ll get there eventually.

    #493350
    nessienoonessienoo
    Member

    There will be various stages to the collapse of society due to peak oil. The trick is being flexible enough to to adapt and survive each one of them.

    Jobs, money and health are going to be the biggest issues we’ll encounter first. If you can keep yourself employed and healthy for the next five years you’ll be doing well.

    According to the reading and research I’ve done, I agree it will be a long slow decline. One of the better pieces of advice I came across was to begin making small lifestyle changes prior to it being imposed by necessity thus lessening the anxiety that goes hand in hand with sudden change.

    I suffer from anxiety and was really worried about the future. What if the power went out for a long time, or we could no longer afford the bills? Our lives revolve around having electricity. My response was to begin ‘prepping’ for this before it might occur. I used to be an historical re-enactor so it’s not much of a stretch for me but my anxiety is lessened by knowing that I have the information and tools I need to cope without power and water from outside my property.

    We keep a stock of food we can’t grow ourselves in case one of us loses our job. We buy hand-tools and kitchen gadgets that don’t require electricity or fuel to run.

    We have ways to cook, clean, wash, entertain and protect ourselves if necessary.

    #493351
    DennisDennis
    Member

    Its true that a good sense of humor and calmness at a tough time is required and this also helps others in the group. RW. I was not sure if you were saying both you and I are mental cases because of our survival attitude. lol.

    #493352
    roadwarriorroadwarrior
    Member

    Yeah, I was referring to both of us. We’ve got to be nuts. It would be so much easier to pretend business as usual wouldn’t it?

    #493353
    DennisDennis
    Member

    Yep sure would. I just wonder if we stuck our heads in the sand if it would all be ok.

    #493354
    roadwarriorroadwarrior
    Member

    You mean kind of like would a tree fall in the woods if there was nobody there to hear it? Nah. We’d be in just as much trouble as everyone else.

    The last 6 months has been a real eye opener. You can see the conflict evolving around food and oil prices around the world; exactly what we have been saying would happen. Unfortunately its all going according to plan.

    #493355
    DennisDennis
    Member

    Very true, I find the events unfolding at a rate that even makes the likes of me sit up and take notice. Another thing that keeps coming into my mind is the thought ” are you ready mate ” and I look around to see if I have forgotten something. But I guess no matter how prepared we are there will always be something that we have not done. Then we will just have to make do without it.

    The main thing is to look at what we do have.

    A relatively safe home plus the knowledge of some where else to go to if things get worse.

    A good supply of food plus seeds etc,

    The ability to and the knowledge of hunting and fishing.

    Bush survival skills.

    Medical and first aid knowledge.

    A means of cooking whether it be wood, gas , electric or what ever plus a back up supply of what ever you are using.

    Tools and equipment that you might need at present and in the future.

    Also at least one friend because talking the dog gets tiring sometimes.

    Plus plus plus.

    #493356
    mistyhollowsmistyhollows
    Member

    Oh wow I’ve missed 4 pages of this thread and have just caught up!

    First let me say I love reading some of the redneck threads in Aussurvivalist forum. There is actually a medico in there who has some great info and advice. Yes there are some in there that would scare the daylights out of me if I came across them but generally I think there are a hell of a lot worse out there sometimes.

    I love my kids and would not be without them. Life would just not be the same and I respect others decisions not to have them for whatever reason they do. I factor their safety into what I do every day.

    The events unfolding around the world these days scare the living daylights out of me, I just read that the nuclear power plant in Japan is leaking radioactivity into the water due to a crack in the plant somewhere. Goodness knows what an effect this will have and for how long the results of this will last for.

    I’ve read lately that the NRMA is predicting petrol prices to rise to $2.00/litre soon. No surprises there really but if you live out in the sticks it costs more to get around. I was actually talking to DH this morning about getting a little trailer for the push bike for the young one to do the school pick up of the older child in the afternoon. Guess this would help with RW’s jenny craig weight loss thread too…..that’s next on my list to read :laugh:

    Now I’m really starting to feel like a whako but today we took the kids for a bush walk to a local national park with waterfalls etc etc. On the walk around I was taking note of all the bush foods they list on the little description plaques placed along the way describing plants etc. I even found my self photographing some to keep the info as we have some of those plants on our property. Funny thing is even DH was taking notes too :laugh: :laugh:

    Now off to read RW’s weight loss thread, ’cause funnily enough I decided only yesterday that it wouldn’t hurt to improve the fitness some more….

    #493357
    lavmanlavman
    Member

    Good topic, I’ve enjoyed reading all the comments. It’s very hard to know what to do, I think the recent floods highlighted or at least gave us a sneak preview of what is coming and how unprepared the majority of people are and how much we all rely on the shops for our everyday living.

    In response to how I am responding to peak oil, in the last week or so we have been re-evaluating what we are doing, it’s so easy to go off track and get in a rut chasing your tail, so a bit of cleansing and redirecting is needed.

    Stepping back and looking at our situation, it’s not going to be too painful, we have a large permie garden set up but it needs a fair bit of attention atm but within weeks it can be fully functional again, we also have staple food growing on a larger scale (but not too large) down the paddock i.e. we have one bed of sweet spuds, one row english spuds, one bed of pumpkins, combined beds of ginger, turmeric, yacon and arrowroot. ( the beds/rows are about 90m long) as well as garlic on a commercial scale.

    We still have potatoes and pumpkins stored under the house and a lot can already be harvested from the paddock, we have a fair few fruit and nut trees that are bearing, at the moment we have a glut of dragon fruit (our son has discovered how to pollinate them) and they are yum!

    We also have a few head of cattle for meat and a jersey for milk, we have six damara sheep (breeders) which will also supply meat in the future, we also have milking goats (I prefer this to cow’s milk, however cows are a lot easier and cheaper to manage) not sure if we will stay with the goats and about two dozen chooks for eggs.

    We have short term storage in containers under the house which alone could carry us for a month or more but as for long term I believe there is so much more to be done, we are very much dependant on the electricity and fuel(diesel and petrol) I was given a wood stove (in exchange for some slashing) and it will be set up in its own building /cookhouse and will be used for preserving our excess.

    Anyway this is a long winded way of saying that while we have a lot of the basics in place it would still be a struggle if we were to maintain a fairly good standard of living, there is still so much to think about, one example that highlighted this a couple of months back, when we were flooded, in my wife ran out of matches and couldn’t light the gas stove(no it doesn’t have a lighter) she had to borrow some from a neighbour, I guess we need to be prepared but we also need community support.

    Cheers Kev

    #493358
    RobyneRobyne
    Member

    I don’t think you are long winded you are looking at tomorrow.

    We picked up a milk separtor today for $20 as it was in pieces. Son has a friend who found it in the shed when he moved in. Hubby said he will put it together when he can. He pulled his arm out of his socket and it still hasn’t healed so he is pottereing. He also has some old milk cans he said I can have but he has to find them first.

    While visiting our youngest son I went with my DIL up to a place called Sams warehouse. I found preserving jars with the lids on for 50c each, so I bought as many as I could I think I got around 20.

    #493359
    mistyhollowsmistyhollows
    Member

    lavman post=308676 wrote: Anyway this is a long winded way of saying that while we have a lot of the basics in place it would still be a struggle if we were to maintain a fairly good standard of living, there is still so much to think about, one example that highlighted this a couple of months back, when we were flooded, in my wife ran out of matches and couldn’t light the gas stove(no it doesn’t have a lighter) she had to borrow some from a neighbour, I guess we need to be prepared but we also need community support.

    I really wonder after reading what you wrote lavman how many of us could sustain even close to our current standards of living if say tomorrow everything changed. That really just hit me smack in the face :ohmy: . I mean who really, really could live the way we live today in a month or two, even longer without loosing the standard of living you currently have. I couldn’t operate my gas stove without matches either and yes I have bought the bulk packs of them 😉 as I need my cuppa :laugh: . But that just really got to me then as seeing how prepared and well stocked you are with animals, how many of the rest of us really have that? Or the opportunity and space to do so. We do have a source of timber we could boil water and cook on as we live next to a forest but not everyone will have that. Do people have alternatives once the gas runs out? I keep my gas bottles well stocked but they won’t last forever if there was no supply or trucks couldn’t get to me to deliver them.

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