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Help me design my raised garden beds

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Viewing 10 posts - 16 through 25 (of 25 total)
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  • #529834
    Anonymous
    Guest

    obviously porgey has no understanding of the range of health issues others can suffer, our hope is he never experiences them. raised beds are ideal just the amount construction some go to to impress.

    anyhow our beds with the new high quality chinese roofing are 840mm high and the second hand galv’ sheets are 680mm high. cannot do anyting else but raised beds and they have oodles of advantages.

    again we need to consider the needs of all in the community unless those with opposing stronger views are going to take on doing gardening for the handicapped, after all getting outside in teh garden is good therapy.

    len

    #529835
    Airgead
    Member

    Hi Folks

    Porgey – yep. I know I could legally get my neighbors to fix things on their side. However, they are in their late 90s and don’t have the physical or financial resources to do anything. They built their house themselves in the 60s and somehow managed to bypass all building regulations. There has been no proper maintenance in years (for obvious reasons) and the place is literally falling down. We’ve been in our place 18 years and their place was a wreck before we moved in. The whole thing is held up with star pickets, wire and the odd bit of wood nailed on. Anyone who buys the house when they move on will have no option but to put a bulldozer through it and start again. We help out where we can (fixed their water pipes a few weeks ago) but its just too far gone.

    All I can do in the mean time is catch the runoff and divert it. Your point about catching and storing it is a good one though. I was just going to pipe it into stormwater but you have me thinking now…

    Len – Yep. Everyone’s garden will be different as everyone has different needs. I’m also looking at raising the beds for my mother in law as she has bad arthritis in the back and can’t bend. Unfortunately, she also has bad arthritis in the hands so her gardening now consists of handing me a list of stuff to do whenever we visit.

    Cheers

    Dave

    #529836
    porgey
    Member

    Hi Dave. I now understand the position you are in and quite obviously, and fairly due to there age, water egress will remain a problem until they shuffle of there mortal coil. If you can fit a bladder tank under your deck to store the water that would be a good start. As for raising the beds my suggestion would be sustainable Cypress. You will have to fill your raised beds so dig a deep hole for the fill and create a soak pit or put a tank in the hole and cover it with a deck/shed/movable potted herbs/ground cover/heli pad etc.

    I made most of my raised beds out of red gum sleepers paid for by ANZ CC reward points redeemed for Bunnings gift vouchers. (I didn’t particularly like the big hardware stores but as the vast majority of hardware stores are supplied by a duopoly it doesn’t really matter any more). So if you put everything on your cc and strictly pay it off every month your drainage problems become a big advantage and you have free water for your garden.

    #529837
    roborthudson
    Member

    Hi Friends ,

    I like the information given by Mr. Gardenlen. The idea of raised garden beds is good. I was also thinking about the same type of raised garden bed design. I also having a raised garden beds in my backyard surrounded by lawn turf its looks beautiful. I using bioactive cocopeat in my raised beds to increase the growth rate of my plants.

    #529838
    Snags
    Member

    Pretty expensive stuff

    why dont you make your own compost and cut out the middle man ?

    #529839
    lmd80
    Member

    Hey Porgey, how do you maintain the ‘no edges’? Is it high maintenance?

    porgey post=351644 wrote: Dave, I would not build raised garden beds. I have 12 of the bastards and a number of non edged ones. Granted the advantage of having them raised is that you dont have to bend down but my changing philosophy of gardening is that the very act of gardening itself is a health pursuit and bending over and/or squating is a beneficial act in itself. In addition you have to fill them to the desired height (certainly not a lazy mans pursuit), maintain timber, its costly, once in place it limits you to that design, and forking over the soil can be problematic.

    I suggest that you improve your drainage and plant deep rooting Lucerne to help open up the soil structure and add as much organic mater to the soil to encourage natural water holding and drainage capacity. Also soft edge your beds with an angled trench and or plants. Spade edging looks very neat and plant edging with flowers such as small marigolds looks terrific and encourages beneficial insects to your patch.

    Edited to add, Hummers suggestion of hay bails is a goodie but they act more as walls than edging imho.

    #529840
    Anonymous
    Guest

    a bit of nay saying going on i think, the bales rot down and become the weed barrier, too easy happens in under 12 months mostly.

    we also planted herby things in the bales

    len

    #529841
    roborthudson
    Member

    Hi Fiends,

    It’s not expensive. You can easily develope this raised garden bed. And it needs less care as compare to others. You can also make raised bed garden if you have less free space in your garden.

    #529842
    Snags
    Member

    IBC will crack after a while in the sun

    you need to paint it.

    #529843
    narelleh
    Member

    i would suggest you chat with Roundthebend – her garden that she had when she lived up here was flooded by the creek (became part of the creek) each year and she had raised beds – still need to bend and stretch to plant and harvest). She had beautiful soil in them and reaped marvellous bountiful crops – send her a message to aske her how it was done or look through the past threads as she did have one up about her place up here

    I used the no dig method using lots of compostable stuff (including newspaper and wood) and made huge mounded type piles which managed to stay just above the water mark of our poorly drained property in Townsville(council drainage ran into properties but they did not think it was their prob)for 3-4 months every year water laid a few inches deep over the ground becoming hot and slimy and green – i had all trees planted on mounds as well to allow them some roots above the hotwater level. I also used large tractor tyres with walls cut out a bit and empty old fridges to make gardens – fill with compostable stuff then add the good stuff ontop to grow thngs in – it would sink over a period of time – just keep adding to top and keep planting them up

    😉

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