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Green Energy/Clean Energy – News, Documentaries, Reviews, Breakthroughs.

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  • #255542
    BullseyeBullseye
    Member

    On SBS One on Tuesday 16 Aug 2011 at 8:30pm a documentary titled Power Surge will be airing, asking the question: Can emerging technology defeat global warming?

    I haven’t seen the program, nevertheless, from the preview it looks like it’s worth some viewing attention.

    The documentary might also be an appropriate beginning to a new thread pertaining to Green Energy or Clean Energy news, documentaries, reviews, breakthroughs, etc.

    Power Surge

    Can emerging technology defeat global warming? The United States has invested tens of billions of dollars in clean energy projects as our leaders try to save our crumbling economy and our poisoned planet in one bold, green stroke. Are we finally on the brink of a green-energy “power surge”, or is it all a case of too little, too late?

    From solar panel factories in China to a carbon capture-and-storage facility in the Sahara desert to massive wind and solar installations in the United States, we travel the globe to reveal the surprising technologies that just might turn back the clock on climate change.

    We will focus on the latest and greatest innovations, including everything from artificial trees to green reboots of familiar technologies like coal and nuclear energy. Can our technology, which helped create this problem, now solve it?

    Power Surge can also be viewed online. http://www.sbs.com.au/documentary/program/powersurge/index

    Lets hope so… 🙂

    #505078
    BobbeeBobbee
    Member

    :wave:

    Thanks for the heads up Bullseye. We will be watching. :tup:

    And yes let’s hope so!!! 🙂

    Happy day,

    Bobbs :hug: :hug: :hug:

    #505079
    MetuMetu
    Member

    Thanks to your post Bullseye, I watched this documentary. 🙂 I recorded it so I can watch it through later, but caught the tail end of it last night before heading to bed.

    I found it interesting how the efficiency argument was portrayed, as I feel efficiency is probably where most people can make savings without drastic changes in infrastructure. Which basically means, improving the insulation qualities of the home. On the scale of the US hall of records, saving over a million dollars per year on energy costs, said quite a lot of the value of efficiency.

    I wasn’t sold on the ambiguity of the solar panels however. We can push out PV’s but it doesn’t say anything for the base load required to store the energy. Not much was spoken about (at least at the tail end of the doco) how PV’s address the storage of energy problem. I may find out more as I watch the beginning of the show however.

    I found the biofuels through brewing beer however, a very hopeful technology. I loved how it endeavoured to borrow on old industrial technology, to reduce the cost of worldwide infrastructure replacements. Of course, the argument for purchasing a more fuel efficient car also bears a lot of thought too.

    I enjoyed how the documentary didn’t shy away from the exploration of renewable technologies, but I also feel it didn’t answer many of the bigger problems of making the switch. Still interesting veiwing though. 🙂

    #505080
    BullseyeBullseye
    Member

    On 7Mate Now!

    Eco Engineering

    Explore the science behind one of Asia’s tallest buildings, which is powered by a revolutionary new means for a building this size: wind.

    #505081
    BullseyeBullseye
    Member
    #505082
    AirgeadAirgead
    Member

    Some more info and analysis on PV grid parity from the Climate Spectator – http://www.climatespectator.com.au/commentary/solar-pv-grid-parity-now-what

    #505083
    BullseyeBullseye
    Member

    Microbes, waste water, sea water with electrolysis and that means an inexhaustible source of energy!

    This is what all sewage treatment works need… :tup:

    Saltwater boosts microbial electrolysis cells to cleanly produce hydrogen

    A grain of salt or two may be all that microbial electrolysis cells need to produce hydrogen from wastewater or organic byproducts, without adding carbon dioxide to the atmosphere or using grid electricity, according to Penn State engineers.

    “This system could produce hydrogen anyplace that there is wastewater near sea water,” said Bruce E. Logan, Kappe Professor of Environmental Engineering. “It uses no grid electricity and is completely carbon neutral. It is an inexhaustible source of energy.”

    Microbial electrolysis cells that produce hydrogen are the basis of this recent work, but previously, to produce hydrogen, the fuel cells required some electrical input. Now, Logan, working with postdoctoral fellow Younggy Kim is using the difference between river water and seawater to add the extra energy needed to produce hydrogen.

    Their results, published in today’s (Sept. 19) issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, “show that pure hydrogen gas can efficiently be produced from virtually limitless supplies of seawater and river water and biodegradable organic matter.”

    Logan’s cells were between 58 and 64 percent efficient and produced between 0.8 to 1.6 cubic meters of hydrogen for every cubic meter of liquid through the cell each day. The researchers estimated that only about 1 percent of the energy produced in the cell was needed to pump water through the system.

    The key to these microbial electrolysis cells is reverse-electrodialysis or RED that extracts energy from the ionic differences between salt water and fresh water. A RED stack consists of alternating ion exchange membranes — positive and negative — with each RED contributing additively to the electrical output.

    “People have proposed making electricity out of RED stacks,” said Logan. “But you need so many membrane pairs and are trying to drive an unfavorable reaction.”

    For RED technology to hydrolyze water — split it into hydrogen and oxygen — requires 1.8 volts, which would in practice require about 25 pairs of membrane sand increase pumping resistance. However, combining RED technology with exoelectrogenic bacteria — bacteria that consume organic material and produce an electric current — reduced the number of RED stacks to five membrane pairs.

    Previous work with microbial electrolysis cells showed that they could, by themselves, produce about 0.3 volts of electricity, but not the 0.414 volts needed to generate hydrogen in these fuel cells. Adding less than 0.2 volts of outside electricity released the hydrogen. Now, by incorporating 11 membranes — five membrane pairs that produce about 0.5 volts — the cells produce hydrogen.

    “The added voltage that we need is a lot less than the 1.8 volts necessary to hydrolyze water,” said Logan. “Biodegradable liquids and cellulose waste are abundant and with no energy in and hydrogen out we can get rid of wastewater and by-products. This could be an inexhaustible source of energy.”

    Logan and Kim’s research used platinum as a catalyst on the cathode, but subsequent experimentation showed that a non-precious metal catalyst, molybdenum sulfide, had a 51 percent energy efficiency. The King Abdullah University of Science and Technology supported this work.

    http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2011-09/ps-sbm091611.php

    #505084
    BullseyeBullseye
    Member

    AN Australian bird, the Bar-tailed godwit, has become the inspiration for a hydrogen-powered jet, the Lockheed Stratoliner.

    “Mr Brown’s design also features four cryogenic hydrogen turbofan engines – which will produce no pollution and use less fuel.

    Cryogenic hydrogen has more than twice the energy of traditional jet fuels and is lighter.

    Even though The Lockheed Stratoliner is just a concept, some airline manufacturers have begun testing hydrogen-power. Boeing unveiled its first hydrogen powered plane in July 2010.”

    #505085
    BullseyeBullseye
    Member

    Sometimes I hear people claim and read that renewable energy sources can’t provide base load power when the sun don’t shine and the wind aint blow’n. That’s incorrect.

    Here’s one way base load power is achieved. :tup:

    Hydrogenics to Provide a One MegaWatt Electrolyzer for Renewable Energy Project

    Germany’s Largest Industrial Scale Wind-Hydrogen Project Selects HySTAT® Technology

    Mississauga, Ontario, Canada – Oct 19, 2011 – Hydrogenics Corporation (NASDAQ: HYGS; TSX: HYG), a leading developer and manufacturer of hydrogen generation and fuel cell products, today announced that it was awarded a contract to deliver and install a 1MW HySTAT® electrolyzer in an industrial scale renewable energy storage project, the largest of its kind in Germany. The system will have the capacity to store up to 27 MWh of energy as hydrogen.

    The full-scale project, by the name RH2-WKA, will be located in Mecklenburg-Vorpommern in northern Germany where the wind regimes are highly favorable. The project owner of the wind-hydrogen system is German-based WIND-projekt GmbH ( http://www.wind-projekt.de ), a leading European turn-key provider and operator of wind energy parks and stand-alone plants. To date WIND-projekt has delivered just under 300 MW of installed wind energy generation onshore and has received building permission for approximately 1 MW offshore. The electrolyzer purchase is funded by the German NIP (Nationale Innovationsprogramm f?r Wasserstoff- und Brennstoffzellentechnologie).

    Power to operate the electrolyzer, including an integrated compressor to store hydrogen at elevated pressure, will be provided by WIND-projekt’s newly installed 140 MW wind farm, harvesting wind energy from an array of 7.5 MW wind turbines. By incorporating hydrogen generation and storage in the system design, the wind’s fluctuating energy is balanced. At the same time energy can be stored for long periods of time. For end-users this ensures a supply of high quality, reliable power from renewable energy sources.

    “The electrolysis of water into hydrogen using excess energy from wind and solar sources is the optimal pathway to increase the renewable content in our energy system mix,” said Daryl Wilson, President and CEO of Hydrogenics. “For a renewable energy project of this scale, WIND-projeckt’s choice of a hydrogen technology storage solution is great validation for this capability. It tells us that Hydrogenics’ long-standing dedication to this market opportunity has been well-placed.”

    The stored hydrogen will be used as needed to generate electricity for the RH2-WKA project. The system will also allow the hydrogen to be used for transport and be fed to the natural gas network. Wind energy is considered to have significant potential as part of Germany’s announced commitment to phase out all nuclear power by 2020.

    ABOUT HYDROGENICS

    Hydrogenics Corporation ( http://www.hydrogenics.com ) is a globally recognized developer and provider of hydrogen generation and fuel cell products and services, serving the growing industrial and clean energy markets of today and tomorrow. Based in Mississauga, Ontario, Canada, Hydrogenics has operations in North America and Europe.

    http://www.hydrogenics.com/invest/news_Details.asp?RELEASEID=616085

    #505086
    AirgeadAirgead
    Member

    Yep. There’s many ways of doing renewable base load. Its all about storing energy. You can use batteries, compressed gas,hydrogen or heat storage as molten salt. There are pilot plants featuring all of these up and running now and production scale salt storage plants feeding baseload power into the grid in Spain.

    Its not as hard as some people think.

    Cheers

    Dave

    #505087
    BullseyeBullseye
    Member

    Airgead post=327535 wrote: Yep. There’s many ways of doing renewable base load. Its all about storing energy. You can use batteries, compressed gas,hydrogen or heat storage as molten salt. There are pilot plants featuring all of these up and running now and production scale salt storage plants feeding baseload power into the grid in Spain.

    Its not as hard as some people think.

    Cheers

    Dave

    Aint that worth its salt… 😉 Also, salt, is plentiful while heating it for a heat exchange solution is renewable.

    #505088
    BullseyeBullseye
    Member

    “Airdrop Irrigation” a solar powered, moisture harvesting system from the evaporated water moisture from the air, developed by an Australian wins 2011 the international “James Dyson Award” for design. http://www.dexigner.com/news/24152

    #505089
    owlbrudderowlbrudder
    Member

    And on a much lighter note, this short video is a hoot! Demolishing dirty power: way to go.

    #505090
    BullseyeBullseye
    Member

    Hey owlbrudder, did you see in the news, the US has approved a nuclear power plant, that they haven’t done so in a long while and it’s already substantially under construction – at a cost of $40 Billion!!!

    What other forms of electricity generation could one buy for $40 Billion???!!!

    PS thanks for the chuckle! :laugh:

    #505091
    AirgeadAirgead
    Member

    Bullseye post=337993 wrote:

    What other forms of electricity generation could one buy for $40 Billion???!!!

    All of them I think… Not a cheap option is it. Or quick. No output from the newly approved plant expected until 2017.

    The approval is for two new 1000Mw (1Gw) reactors. That’s $2M/Mw. And that’s just construction costs. Nothing there about ongoing costs.

    Cheers

    Dave

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