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Gardening in a semi-arid subtropical landscape – Mount Isa

Home Forums FOOD PRODUCTION, HARVEST AND STORAGE The Garden Log Gardening in a semi-arid subtropical landscape – Mount Isa

Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 33 total)
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  • #528158
    BlueWrenBlueWren
    Member

    All I can think of is the cold last night!! They were all fine before that in their little green house.Down to 1C here tomorrow am, frost in some places ……last week we had a day with 35C.The Moringas are indoors tonight.I guess Isa is chilly tonight too.Hope your fruit will be OK.

    I just Googled .10C for you tomorrow saturday at 6.00am.

    #528159
    mrgnomemrgnome
    Member

    Darn the 1C might just have been the cause BW 🙁 And yes its “chilly” here tonight lol.. about 16C currently.. maybe down to 14/15C at the lowest I’d guess.

    #528160
    BronBron
    Member

    Your garden is looking fabulous! We’ve just started having warm weather (then really cold days following storms. Go figure) so my plants are starting to grow.

    #528161
    mrgnomemrgnome
    Member

    Thanks Bron 🙂

    Along with growing a small range of vegetables, I’ve also began planting a range of subtropical and tropical fruits..

    Here is the avocado I planted a few weeks ago.. I’m quite pleased with its progress so far.. at the base of the fruit trees I’ve planted so far, I’ve planted cucurbits; melons, pumpkins, cucumbers etc- mainly to make use of the area I have to water :whistle:

    The sweet potato are also doing well so far.. planted a few more sweetcorn amongst them..

    In the same bed as the sweet potato are some more cos lettuce, small coloured lettuce and rocket

    Along the back fence behind the sweet potato I’ve planted some loofah.. As I’ve never previously grown or eaten a loofah I am quite excited to see how they fare….

    Yellow Cherry Tomato’s I germinated are planted along the adjacent fence in the same bed

    There are also a few capsicum plants behind the eggplant at the back of the sweet potato..

    #528162
    mrgnomemrgnome
    Member

    After hearing so much about the Black Sapote, I picked one up and have planted that.. Apparently they taste like chocolate.. a watermelon and butternut pumpkin are planted at its feet 🙂

    The mangoes are also filling out nicely

    as are the lychees

    :clap:

    Attached files

    #528163
    mrgnomemrgnome
    Member

    Planted some apple cucumber with the tahitian lime.. they are just starting to form some fruit:

    The butternut pumpkins are forming early also:

    And the sweetcorn is just beginning to form cobs

    :clap:

    #528164
    clareccclarecc
    Member

    Looking good – interesting contrast to Perth. What veges do the locals usually grow? Is there anything you didn’t even try due to the different climate/soil?

    #528165
    mrgnomemrgnome
    Member

    Hi Clarecc.. the few locals I’ve managed to chat to seem to have success with most vegetables, even the brassicas.. however, many also have their entire vegetable garden under permanent shadecloth or affix shadecloth during the extreme summer temperatures.

    There isn’t anything I have thought not to try growing here so far; though I am experiencing problems with sooty mould on my zucchini’s and have lost all my roma tomatoes to blight ( i think this is what it is).. so i’ve ordered some tomato seeds that are apparently resistant to blight/fungus’.. At a guess, the vegetables that wouldn’t be worth planting would be anything that requires cold.. even though the nights here can be a little chilly, the days are all quite warm still..

    #528166
    mrgnomemrgnome
    Member

    Picked up another load of cow manure/hay from the local cattle rail-siding.. it’s an awesome mix of pulverised poo.. basically a deep-litter cow poo system.. at $20 for a big trailer load its a great deal :tup:

    #528167
    mrgnomemrgnome
    Member

    Some yacon I previously planted have just pushed their heads up… anyone tried this previously? whats it taste like?

    Planted a few more pawpaw today.. managed to pick up two of the red-fleshed variety.. along with a blue java banana and another wampi and black sapote :woohoo:

    #528168
    S.O.PS.O.P
    Member

    I only got small tubers last year as I planted them late. From those 2 plants, I got 3-5 plants per 150mm pot, 9 pots and I’ve planted them out. Same height as yours. So replacement is exponential.

    As for the taste, it was nice. Even my kids had a go and they are fussy. A little pear-y from memory.

    And your loofah, watch how fast it grows when the water is available. Last year was my first time and it does at least 30cm a day.

    #528169
    mrgnomemrgnome
    Member

    Hi SOP… sure hope the loofah planted here grow as fast as yours did.. just germinated another 6.. hoping to get them to cover the dividing fence and provide some afternoon shade for the rest of the garden bed. Did you eat any of the loofah or leave them all to set seed/form internal the “sponge” structure??

    I think I have 6 yacon planted all up. so far they’ve been quite slow to grow :blink:

    how high did yours grow??

    #528170
    S.O.PS.O.P
    Member

    Probably between 1 and 1.2 metres. Keeping in mind that I didn’t irrigate but we had the one of the wettest Summers. This year will be very different it seems. Out of water, maintenance watering only to keep things from dying.

    I didn’t eat any of the loofah/luffa, I was more interested in harvesting sponges and wasn’t too sure on how many would make it through. About 80% were perfect, some got a brown rot through the fibre.

    I also kept my vine small by pruning back to the nodes on any stray tendrils so my total harvest was small as well.

    Only photo I have of Yacon, a month or 2 before harvest:

    #528171
    mrgnomemrgnome
    Member

    Hi SOP. you’re loofah sure seemed to be enjoying themselves.. looking real healthy there.. was that one plant or several? and whats that they are clambering up, a swing-set frame?

    the yacon appear to grow in a similar way to Jerusalem Artichoke…

    #528172
    S.O.PS.O.P
    Member

    That was one plant, I put 2 seeds in the ground, culled one. And then every time you harvest one, you get a hundred more seeds back.

    That is a swingset, and like I said, many wayward tendrils were removed to contain it. A person on another forum said hers escaped up into a Eucalypt and then rained Loofah seeds down when they split.

    Soil was very poor there, and still is, I built up beds of mulch and subsoil without any fertilising regime and you should see them now, bone dry and crappy. I’ve replaced it with a green choko, in the exact same spot, and I assume the choko is waiting for it to rain. Yacon is struggling in this heat and full sun (last year the Pigeon Pea was more dense).

    Turns out from looking around, there is a few different shapes of Loofah, some wider and longer, or more bell-shaped. Mine were thin and long.

    More photos here: http://imgur.com/a/LGqVY

Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 33 total)
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