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GARBAGE – Cutting Carbons Challenge

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Viewing 15 posts - 31 through 45 (of 49 total)
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  • #306130
    jasali
    Member

    I have got into the habit of using my “green” shopping bags at last:tup::)

    #306131
    Anastasia
    Member

    I went to bulk foods today and remembered to take my snaplock bags to put everything in. He actually commented on how prepared I was! LOL!!

    #306132
    Anastasia
    Member

    What do people use for bin liners? My partner periodically accepts plastic bags for shopping which we use as garbage bags, we used to buy biodegradable garbage bags but when they were no longer available we started using the plastic bags as I don’t want to BUY, and thus support, plastic garbage bags that don’t degrade. Are there now garbage bags available that biodegrade? Or does anyone have any other hints on what they use?

    #306133
    jaygee
    Member

    Hi Anastasia, yes there are definitely biodegradable bin liner bags available now – my concern with them is that they still don’t degrade in the anaerobic environment of the average landfill site (they will in an aerobic compost bin at home however). You could try lining your bins with newspaper as a lot of people do? I couldn’t be bothered so I don’t line it at all and take the whole bin with me to the wheelie bin when I empty it outside, then I rinse it briefly with the water I saved from the kitchen, and let it soak once a week.

    As for my garbage challenge this week – I went OK, although having a rainwater tank delivered that was completely wrapped in layers of plastic wrap filled up my wheelie bin :tdown: Other than that, I don’t think I reduced our waste by 10% but I know I did much better than in the previous week, so I’m pretty happy with that 🙂 Got a long way to go to match a lot of you guys though! Baby steps…

    #306134
    osakasuz
    Member

    I heard that the biodegradable bags also leach chemicals when they do degrade, but don’t quote me on that one.

    It’s amazing that they even wrap tanks in plastic, isn’t it! They guy that delivered one of ours said that some people complained if their tanks were dirty on arrival :|.

    It think with garbage it is about baby steps, Julie. We all have a big challenge because plastic and unneccessary packaging is just

    everywhere

    ! It’s so hard to avoid all packaging. But each step is a step in the right direction.

    #306135
    Anastasia
    Member

    There’s no way the man will go for newspaper lining and I do believe our council has a requirement that garbage is bagged. I’ll keep looking then.

    #306136
    osakasuz
    Member

    I have been thinking about this today and the best I could come up with is some kind of homemade newspaper bag, or wrap the lot in newspaper and then tie it up with string…. A cloth bag would be no good as you have to have the rubbish bagged for collection… I have to say those giant trucks with the automatic arms to lift the giant bins must be a factor in requiring rubbish to be bagged – if it were people loading smaller bins, it wouldn’t matter so much.

    #306137
    Anastasia
    Member

    What do you use Suz?

    #306138
    osakasuz
    Member

    We still have a bunch of the biodegradable bags to get through and it is taking a while because we really only use one bag a week at most now. But it usually contains those little bits of plastic that are hard to remove from your life. So I think removing the plastic bits that end up in the bin is a good goal for us at the moment. In the meantime, I think I’ll try the newspaper wrapping thing. For me having the rubbish wrapped in something is important because it will end up all over the road if it isn’t wrapped.

    Also, is there no point in the wrapping being biodegradable if the contents are not?

    #306139
    mossy
    Member

    This is something that has really been playing on my mind lately, so I’m in 100%

    Steps I’ve taken recently –

    I bought a stainless steal drink bottle which I take everywhere with me religiously.

    I’m learning the art of making my own cat food. The amount of cans I was going through was insane. And when you read the ingredients you wonder if the poor cat gets any nutrition from them at all. So buying meat and eggs from the butcher.

    Goals to work towards –

    stop using glad wrap.

    Buy some glass tuppawear like containers. Most of my plastic ones have lids/bottoms missing and are looking worse for wear. But i’d hate to go out and buy more plastic.

    I live in a little complex of 3 units and everyone just uses each other bins and we only have 2 recycle bins, so I’m not entirely sure how much waste we’re producing :shy: So this week will be one of monitoring everything so I know what and how much I need to cut down 😐

    Oh and as for shampoos and things like that, Lush sell shampoo, body wash, cleansers and things in bar form. You pay by the weight and they wrap it in paper (I ask them not to though). They also sell things in plastic pots, but they offer insentives for people who bring them back.

    #306140
    purplehat
    Member

    I’m keen on this too. We only use about 1 shopping bag worth of garbage a week (there’s just two of us living here thou), but our recycling bin is often full – and it’s a big recycling bin. I agree, it’s annoying that there’s no incentive to save. We can’t get any smaller a bin from the council! They really should weigh them and you pay for what you throw out.

    The bulk of the recycling bin are UHT milk cartons (rice milk) and tins of fruit. The rice milk should be no more once we’ve gotten rid of the last 2 boxes in our store (another couple of weeks at most) but I need to get hold of some bulk brown rice or we’ll be in trouble. That’ll cut our recycling bin in half, I bet.

    Otherwise we do lots of things to reduce our waste. Something that caught my eye on a blog I read though, these bamboo toothbrushes. I use the replaceable head ones (eco-dent I think?) but these ones look really cool. I wonder if they’ll go in the compost once they’re used?

    The Environmental Toothbrush

    Edit: I bit the bullet and got some. I’ll let you guys know if they arrive, and if they’re any good. 😆

    #306141
    Chezza
    Member

    😆 This thread was last seen in 2007….

    #306142
    purplehat
    Member

    Oops 😆 Never mind, still as relevant as it was back in 2007. 😀

    #306143
    Chezza
    Member

    Absolutley!! :tup:

    #306144
    Ce_Anx
    Member

    Excellent post! This is what my partner and I have been trying to explain to people!

    We have been trying really hard to avoid plastic, and have now convinced ourselves of the toxicity of plastic and the detriment of our environment (sure, we don’t live at the rubbish dump, but we don’t want our children to live above one in the future either).

    We now go shopping for things we actually need, and endeavor to buy second hand items such as clothing, food storage, kitchen utensils, material. and gift ideas. In fact, my partner and I have an agreement that we will only buy second hand presents for each other, or make them ourselves.

    When we go shopping we bring our own bags. We mostly avoid plastic packaged items, but due to our finances cannot entirely avoid these things and they are then bought with guilt – and a disappointed silence on the way home. We have taken to going to the butcher with our own containers to be filled, or we request our purchases be wrapped only in paper (and not that little plastic bag stuff that they pick the meat up with). We have endured ridicule from the very people we bought from, including being treated rudely (even after explaining that plastic doesn’t break down, and paper does “but how many trees did they have to chop down to make the paper?”), and being ignored service with a disgusted shake of the head – simply because we asked them not to use plastic.

    It is such a boost of support for us, knowing that we aren’t the only ones ‘going mad’, especially when it is becoming harder and harder to buy goods without plastic packaging. Even cardboard boxes are now being ‘sealed’ with shrink wrap plastic! Surely those sultanas tasted just as good before they started wrapping them in plastic.

    We live in a rented house, where the landlords are very accepting of our lifestyle and let us garden how we want and put in a rain water tank.

    We use bamboo toothbrushes – the only thing plastic are the bristles, we make our own soap, and occasionally our own toothpaste (this is difficult to take to as we really like the shop bought toothpaste rather than the bicarb), we compost all our green waste (including paper), we have just started trialling a different toilet system for our no 1’s where we use cut up bits of cloth to use as wipes and then pop them in a soaking bucket (haven’t quite gathered the courage for no 2’s), we recycle wrapping paper, and make our own cards to give to friends and family, my girl made us some dishcloths from knitted cotton and bamboo, and i made a scrubber/scourer from the plastic net bags some of the fruit and veges came in, we have our own chooks, and grow some veges (though i just started last year, and didn’t want to overload myself with too much at once – so have been adding garden beds little by little, and our aim is to produce most of our own food through spring/summer and dry/preserve/freeze extras for winter).

    I’ve noticed that our kitchen rubbish bin goes out once a week, and isn’t even full. I discovered biodegradable garbage bags from Bunnings, and wondering if anyone else uses them?

Viewing 15 posts - 31 through 45 (of 49 total)
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