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Further to Ali's food thread…

Home Forums FOOD PRODUCTION, HARVEST AND STORAGE Fruit, Vines, Nuts and Sprouts Further to Ali's food thread…

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  • #243822
    Tullymoor
    Member

    Ali’s thread has got us thinking, thanks Ali :hug: about things we would prefer not to live without and that may just grow here.

    Can anyone help with info on:

    Curry plant….Can this (or another plant) ever replace Keens style curry powder for my curry lovin’ mate???

    Coffee trees…. Where to get, what they like, how you process it, how many would you need?

    Stevia….would like to know more about this.

    Pearl Barley….is this a type of barley or is it normal old barley that’s been made pearl barley by some process. Someone posted about using this instead of rice, I love it in soups so why not??

    There were more but I forgot to write them all down :confused:

    #351951
    Woz
    Member

    Curry Planthttp://www.mountainvalleygrowers.com/heltalicum.htm

    “While not very tasty, Curry Plant smells strongly like Curry spices.”

    You may be thinking of the Curry Treehttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Curry_Tree

    “They are commonly used as seasoning in Indian and Sri Lankan cooking, much like bay leaves and especially in curries with fish or coconut milk.”

    Coffee Treehttp://www.justaboutcoffee.com/index.php?file=coffeetree

    “The coffee tree is a shrub with a straight trunk, which can survive for about 50 to 70 years. The first flowers appear during the third year, but production is only profitable from the fifth year onwards.The coffee tree is a shrub with a straight trunk, which can survive for about 50 to 70 years. The first flowers appear during the third year, but production is only profitable from the fifth year onwards.”

    Steviahttp://www.stevia.net/

    “If you’ve ever tasted stevia, you know it’s extremely sweet. In fact, this remarkable noncaloric herb, native to Paraguay, has been used as a sweetener and flavor enhancer for centuries.”

    Pearl Barleyhttp://www.foodsubs.com/GrainBarley.html

    “Pearl barley is polished some more, so that the outer bran layer is also scrubbed off. It’s less nutritious, but more popular since it’s not as chewy as hulled barley and it cooks faster.”

    Disclaimer – no association with above sites.

    Woz

    #351952
    redhen2
    Member

    hey tully. yes, i think curry leaf plant is for making curries. i gave one away before using any, so no first hand experience.

    Barley is more tolerant of soil salinity than wheat. Barley is not as cold tolerant as the winter wheats, fall rye or winter Triticale, but may be sown as a winter crop in warmer areas of the world such as Australia.

    Barley must have its fibrous outer hull removed before it can be eaten. Barley grains with their hulls still on are called covered barley or ‘hulled barley”. Once the grain has had the inedible hull removed, it is called dehulled barley. Pearl barley or pearled barley is hulled barley which has been processed further to remove the bran. It may be polished, a process known as “pearling”. Dehulled or pearl barley may be processed into a variety of barley products, including flour, flakes similar to oatmeal, and grits.

    (that barley bit from wikipedia)

    hth

    #351953
    PermieGirl
    Member

    Curry leaf plant is divine – I adore the smell and I use it in lots of Indian recipes.

    Luckily the indian shop near work sells the leaf for $1 a big bag or I’d be in trouble – the local fruit and veg sells a few snippings for $6. Can’t grow it here without a greenhouse though!

    #351954
    Anja
    Member

    I have the curry plant that woz mentions first. It does smell divine but there isn’t alot of flavour. In fact I’ll be getting rid of it very soon, because it seems a bit useless.

    #351955
    Learning
    Member

    You need to grow ginger, garlic, turmeric, coriander, fenugreek, black pepper, and maybe fennel seed, clove, mustard seed, green cardamom, nutmeg.

    How many of those can you grow where you are? I have a ‘true curry leaf tree’ still only very small, but very yummy. It could never replace turmeric, cumin and garam masala, it’s not the same.

    #351956
    paradisi
    Member

    Learning wrote:

    You need to grow ginger, garlic, turmeric, coriander, fenugreek, black pepper, and maybe fennel seed, clove, mustard seed, green cardamom, nutmeg.

    How many of those can you grow where you are?

    I’m on the sunshine coast and can grow ginger, garlic, turmeric (about as far south as it will grow successfully without microclimates – may be wrong???), coriander – lots of problems because I’m right on the coast, trying to find a proper thai corriander,,, fenugreek, pepper – a bit tender for here, but can be grown,,,, fennel, mustard, cardamom – – if you can find it I you might get away with it on the Sunshine Coast, – most cardamom sold by austrlian nurseries is a poisonous (to humans) type of ginger; nutmeg – probably too tropical – – cloves- too tropical,

    #351957
    jaygee
    Member

    paradisi wrote:

    I’m on the sunshine coast and can grow ginger, garlic, turmeric (about as far south as it will grow successfully without microclimates – may be wrong???)

    I’m in Newcastle at grow these quite successfully without babying them, I reckon anywhere on the coast (i.e. frost free) down to Sydney would have no troubles. Don’t know how you’d go out your way though Tully, I think the ginger and turmeric would need much more water and humidity than you could provide them, although I’d definitely have a go at garlic if I were you.

    Curry leaves are great, but don’t have the “ooomph” that a proper curry powder does (sorry, but Keen’s powder is :rip: ) but they could be a reasonable substitute if proper curry powder proves hard to get in the future?

    I’ve just started growing stevia too, but can’t help you much with that yet, I’ve no experience other than I’ve kept it alive for a few weeks, LOL. The leaves are quite soft, might be too hot for it out your way, unless you covered it with shadecloth? :shrug:

    The same would go for coffee bushes I think – they are a sub-tropical type of plant that grows on mountain sides, shaded by large trees in their natural environment, but perhaps if you has them under shadecloth you might be able to baby them along?

    #351958
    meg53
    Member

    Sorry to break in on this thread but would love to know what you do Jaygee to grow ginger and tumeric successfully in Newcastle. I think it cool that you can grow them so far south. :clap:There is hope for us in Sydney.

    Thanks

    -Meg

    #351959
    Tullymoor
    Member

    Hi Learning, thanks, yeah, I read the ingredients on the Keen’s curry pack and thought there may just be one plant we could grow rather than

    all of those, then process them, etc to make curry powder. :shrug:

    As for the Indian type curry flavourings, my mate is an Aussie Keen’s curry kinda bloke. We don’t want to make Indian style curries.

    I can make shade structures or use the dome for plants that need shade, until such time as all the trees we have and plan, are to a height to be useful for natural shade.

    Thanks for the info so far 😀 Still very interested in the coffee trees…

    #351960
    bushy
    Member

    Coffee trees, and they are more of a tree than a shrub, grow in total sun here, but maybe the outback sun may be too strong.

    They are very easy to grow from seed, so many self sow under my trees I mow them off.

    Need about 30 trees to provide 2 cups coffee a day.

    They are now classed as an environmental weed in this shire.

    #351961
    Tullymoor
    Member

    Please would you send us some seeds Bushy?? We’d like to give it a go 😀

    At 30 trees for 2 cups a day, I’ll need about 350 trees for my needs 😆

    #351962
    bella
    Member

    How tall are your coffee trees, Bushy? I planted one in a spot where I promised not to plant anything over 3m high at maturity. Is my little coffee tree headed for a life of pruning by hubby? (It’s fairly safe, he’s the coffee drinker, not I!) And I guess by what you’re saying I need to plant a LOT more than the one I have already!

    #351963
    bushy
    Member

    Mine are around 4 to 5 m high, and still growing bella, but they are adjacent to tall trees so may be pushing them up for light..

    Haha, yeah, about another 29 I reckon. I don’t even harvest mine as there is a lot of work processing the seed before roasting.

    OK Tully, will do. They will handle some frosts, but not prolonged cold season.

    #351964
    paradisi
    Member

    cheapest coffee trees I’ve founda re at heartgarden.com.au

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