Aussies Living Simply

Fracking – all our arable land – Tasmania?

Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 34 total)
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  • #533291
    calliecatcalliecat
    Participant

    all you can do is keep fighting

    Lead cement?? – my goodness – all I saw was the word lead, – that’s bad enough

    #533292

    Yes, it was about then that my mind siezed up and I stopped listening.. :jawdrop:

    #533293

    Today is the final day for making Comment or a formal Objection. These can be lodged at Service Tasmania for a fee of $40.88c. Remember in any formal objection you must limit yourself to matters pertaining to your (legally demonstrated ie monetary) interest in the area that is the subject of the lease application. You must also limit your objection to threats arising from exploration activities (test drills, ground-truthing etc leading to vehicle movements across your property). If you don’t get one on, you may still, legally refuse access to your property for exploration purposes. If sufficient adjacent owners do the same thing, you have a chance to protect your property from mining – if they do not find a resource they can not apply for an extraction permit.

    #533294

    Right – well a little more research has revealed that there are, in fact five licenses in Tasmania – Exploration licenses, that is. The one up north is held by Overseas Holdings Limited and has been granted. The one to the west of the midlands is held by Great South Land Minerals (currently in receivership and to be taken over by TOG if they can obtain an extension on the license. This is currently under appeal). The three remaining exploration licenses are still being sought and cover both the Nothern and Southern Midlands, Upper Derwent and – wait for it – the area to the South of Hobart till you drop off the bottom. These areas are all for Category 4 mineral research – that is petrochemicals. They may include both traditional and unconventional (fracking) mining activity, shale gas or CSG.

    I found on LIST a map of the agricultural potential of soils in Tasmania – it is pretty well an echo of the permit area apart from that area in the Deep South which I am sure you will know has considerable environmental value.

    I would love to post the maps for you but have yet to work out how to do that. If you PM me with your email address I will send them to you.

    #533295

    If you have not liked our Facebook page yet, we have changed the name – so please find us now at Stop Unconventional Mining Tasmania!!

    #533296
    RobyneRobyne
    Member

    Makes you wonder what school of stupidity some government workers go to???

    Its not now its what will happen to the under graound water and the food that is grown in the areas it has been

    done in years to come

    I think it was in GR about someone who had lived on this property for years and did all the organic

    practises and thougth he would build a dam to breed fish to sell and found over 50years before there was

    a large amount of DDT used and they said it will never go away.

    Our local area is getting a swimming pool cost to both councils $21, million.

    Council has spent heaps on consultants, The land they are putting it on is swamp land.

    So in time it will sink, and cost more money

    Again government not listening to people who know what htey are talking about.

    #533297

    Ours has similar funding – to build it dead centre in our historic streetscape on which we rely for tourism income – the world is rapidly going mad…

    There is a meeting in Bothwell tomorrow night regarding Fracking if you want to go.

    #533298
    RobyneRobyne
    Member

    too far for me to come but wish you all the best.

    Maybe get someone from the Wilderness Society to come and listen to their reasonings.

    #533299

    It’s a meeting we organised Robyne – the applicant has thus far refused to accept our invitations (in fact has publicly stated they were not received in the first instance). The second invitation was acknowledged but declined. Odd though, that they took the unusual step of making a press release, in Tasmanian Country, which by pure coincidence appeared on the day of our first meeting…

    I shan’t be heading to the meeting as a) I have no money for fuel and b)it will possibly snow tonight and I don’t want to find myself battling home through a blizzard, however other members of our group will be present to address the meeting about our earlier one. The next meeting is in Oatlands on September 13th and will include Dr Gavin Mudd and Mark Ogge as speakers – both respected academics. We also hope to have a five minute presentation from the ODE as well as a local farmer speaking.

    #533300

    The Tasmanian Greens today called for a two year, statewide moratorium to be placed on the practice of hydraulic fracturing (fracking), based upon its negative impact on the environment and growing concerns of landowners over their rights to refuse access to mining companies.

    Greens Member for Lyons, Tim Morris MP, said that the current public consultation process is not adequate considering how invasive mining can be and that if rights are not strengthened, farmers in Tasmania could be facing increased pressure from mining as resources are exhausted elsewhere around the country.

    “Our first priority needs to be protecting the environment and our farmers and the Greens want a minimum two year, statewide moratorium placed on fracking at least until adequate processes are put in place,” said Mr Morris.

    “The Greens today tabled our motion for the moratorium, which we intend to bring on for debate and a vote tomorrow.”

    “Last year the Liberal Victorian Government introduced a moratorium on fracking after sustained lobbying from the agricultural sector, environmental groups and communities.”

    “Around the world there are many examples of fracking crippling communities.”

    “The potential costs associated with this type of mining far outweigh the limited benefits of a few jobs and a finite resource that will one day dry up.”

    “The jobs that this industry could destroy in the agriculture would not be replaced by the mining activity and they certainly wouldn’t be sustainable.”

    “Some of the farms in the Southern Midlands have been passed down through six generations and provide the fundamental economic support for the small towns in the region.”

    “Labor and the Liberals have the opportunity to stand up for real Tasmanians here, not for corporations that just want to come down, exploit our resources and move on to the next place.”

    Greens Private Member’s Time (fracking): Wednesday 28th August, debate commences at 12 noon, vote occurs at 2:50pm (with a lunch break from 1-2:30pm.)

    If anyone wants a seat in the Members box, email me at Stopfrackingourfarms@outlook.com

    #533301

    I have now seen democracy in action. Long live dictatorships (as long as the people in charge have a clue what they are talking about).

    #533302

    One of the down sides of living in a small rural community is that everyone knows what you are doing (frequently before you do!!). It is also one of the up sides. Our Dep Pres was sitting in her shop yesterday wondering where to get money from to pay to have our signs printed when in came a local carrying a large bag. He said – ‘I’ve just come into a bit of money and I have $20,000 here with me – how much do you need?’ Gobsmacked, she stammered out … $2,000? and he counted it out into her hand …. amazing stuff huh! 🙂

    #533303
    nadijillnadijill
    Member

    I have been following your thread with interest. As i am looking to move to Tassie in the near future and have a small property there, how are things progressing with the fracking issue?

    Great news about the windfall. Hope it helps.

    #533304

    Fairly slowly at present. We are planning a barbecue in November to inform the community around Tunnack which is fairly anti-greenie and so not listening to what we are saying or coming to our information sessions. We met yesterday with the Exec Director of MRT and his head geologist to discuss our concerns and I will be emailing a followup requesting the reference material they said they had available. Ironically, they are waving the same document at us that we are waving at them but drawing rather more optimistic conclusions from it than we are. They have also now decided it is not shale gas, but tight gas they are after … it does get confusing and they wonder why we lack confidence in their advice. They did, quite reasonably, point out that our FB page is getting cluttered up with more extremist literature and that it is drifting toward a CSG message which is irrelevant in Tassie (our coal was baked by the igneous outflows that overlie it, and the gasses are long gone, along with much of the benefits in the coal seams). We will be setting up a Website so as to have more control over the literature we are associated with as we do not want to lose credibility by taking the extreme view.

    Where in Tassie are you planning to move to, or is it too soon to tell?

    #533305
    SnagsSnags
    Member

    Long term they fail its a ponzi scheme lets hope there isnt too much damage in the interim.

    http://www.resilience.org/stories/2013-10-02/snake-oil-chapter-2-technology-to-the-rescue

    Hiring personnel, renting the drilling rig, paying for the lease, hiring trucks—all of this is expensive.

    By the time you turn on the tap, you probably will have invested $10 to $20 million in your well pad—which, if you’ve been drilling for gas, may produce only $6 to $15 million worth of product over its lifetime at today’s prices.

    If it’s an oil well, you are more likely to show a profit, though there’s no guarantee.

    The cornucopians trying desperately to hang on to BAU in a Peak Oil reality

    When the banks stop lending it stops all we need is a few big loses to scare them.

    The bad thing is its global and in unison so there is no sit back and see them fail without screwing your water .

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