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Edible front yard plantings.

Home Forums OVER THE BACK FENCE General chat and catching up Edible front yard plantings.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 34 total)
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  • #258278
    MistyHMistyH
    Participant

    What edible plants do you put in your front garden?  As I’m looking to replant a lot of the old, dead, useless jungle plants I need to pick everyone’s brain cells for ideas 😉 .  I have to work around an inground water tank, retaining wall and driveway and would like to hide the first 2 as much as possible!  My thoughts are blueberries, strawberries, asparagus etc as DH wants to keep the front as ornamentals.  I’ll have to keep some current ornamental shrubs for privacy.  Soooooo ‘my’ compromised plan is to plant edibles that ‘look’ like ornamentals  ;)).  Any other ideas?

    #538125
    SteveSteve
    Keymaster

    Parsley makes a nice ornamental as do some of the other herbs. Parsley makes a nice border.

    #538126
    SteveSteve
    Keymaster

    Here is one of my gardens with parsley in it. It has even self seeded and growing between the bricks in the retaining wall.

    #538127
    PinetreePinetree
    Member

    Do roses for rose hip tea count?
    Pinetree

    #538128
    Judi BJudi B
    Keymaster

    Rosemary can be clipped into a hedge, basil there are coloured leafed varieties, rosella I grew these in a front garden once colourful when in flower and again when the fruit is on, cape gooseberry can be straggly but looks good, rainbow chard… says it all very colourful, arrowroot eat the roots, tatsoi can look good planted along the edge of a bed…..

    #538129
    Judi BJudi B
    Keymaster

    just had a thought chives both onion and garlic look pretty in flower.

    #538130
    AUSSIEDOWNUNDERAUSSIEDOWNUNDER
    Participant

    My rosemary is flowering  do you clip it or what

    #538131
    Judi BJudi B
    Keymaster

    I don’t clip mine….but you can if it is getting straggly clipping will make it bushier, don’t cut back too hard.
    The clippings can then become cuttings = free new plants 🙂

    #538132
    AUSSIEDOWNUNDERAUSSIEDOWNUNDER
    Participant

    Thanks will do

    #538133
    earthwalkerearthwalker
    Participant

    Chilli plants and capsicums look pretty, you could probably sneak in some frilly lettuce.  Most herbs are pretty too, lavender, dogbane, tansy, fennel, catmint….the list is long.  My first husband hated me planting veges in the front garden….he used to travel a lot for work and he used to say he would not be at all surprised if he came back one day and there was a goat tethered to the letter box. 🙂

    #538134
    dentydogdentydog
    Member

    I have a citrus fruit tree mini orchard, and we are constructing a herb spiral as well.

    #538135
    AUSSIEDOWNUNDERAUSSIEDOWNUNDER
    Participant

    Stop it you guys 

    Reading this my brain is working overtime

    #538136
    MuklukMukluk
    Participant

    There are a lot of edible plants that look ornamental and some of them people may not realise are edible.

    Many herbs look great and you could be excused for not knowing that they are also useful.  Things such as nasturtium look amazing, as do some of the fancier lettuces.

    Potato leaf tomatoes look rather ornamental, some varieties taste pretty amazing too.  Tomatoes and potatoes were cultivated in Europe for some time as ornamentals rather than edibles.  As mentioned above chilli plants can be rather beautiful and they come in a plethora of colours as well as some that taste/smell like tropical fruits.  Some snow peas and shelling peas look amazing with purple flowers and yellow pods or purple pods, people often comment on how they thought mine were sweet peas rather than productive vegetables.

    Some fruit trees such as medlar, feijoa, pomegranate etc look extremely ornamental.  I would grow medlar simply for looks if it was not edible, it is a beautiful tree.  Many people who see mine have no idea that they are not simply ornamental.  There is the Huonville crabapple which is meant to be a natural cross between an apple and crab apple, it is said to have purple leaves as well as edible fruit.  Grapes, kiwi fruit and passion fruit can be rather stunning if grown in the right way.

    Perennial vegetables such as yacon, QLD arrowroot, skirret, dahlia, Jerusalem artichoke, day lilly, coloured silverbeet, purple asparagus etc look nice and many people would not know they are edible.  A lot of these are low maintanence and highly productive which is a bonus.  Tree onions and Babington’s leeks both send up flower stalks with bulblets that never fail to start conversations, but I don’t know if they look pretty enough for this situation?

    If you lived somewhere warm pineapple, babaco and mango are all very attractive options.  I have never grown them due to frosts but have admired them in people’s gardens when we are driving through Sydney.

    There are a heap of good looking options out there, I think it is more a question of your climate and what you like to eat, from there you can look for more ornamental looking varieties.

    #538137
    Frankie84Frankie84
    Member

    An archway of grape vines? Would that work? I’ve seen some beautiful creeping photos. But I haven’t grown grapes before

    #538138
    calliecatcalliecat
    Participant

    had mine over a gate archway at the old  place, but was a gate into the paddock though

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 34 total)
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