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Aussies Living Simply

Dreading my next meal…

Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 50 total)
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  • #518705
    GiannaGianna
    Member

    lisanne post=335952 wrote: Zippy when you eat the meat what else are you eating with them? If it’s anything that is high carb so pasta, rice, breads, potatoes, corn (for examples) then that is what is making you feel heavy.

    Think back to what the cavemen ate – Whole foods!!

    Mmmmm, grilled steak with only a huge raw salad on the side and I feel great! 🙂

    Eating apples makes me hungrier than normal.

    #518706
    mistyhollowsmistyhollows
    Member

    Gianna post=336017 wrote:

    Eating apples makes me hungrier than normal.

    I am the same. What is it with apples???

    #518707
    GiannaGianna
    Member

    Dunno MH. :shrug: According to a famous search engine, it happens to a lot of people.

    #518708
    Forest RavenForest Raven
    Member

    Good on you for experimenting, you never know unless you try all things out! :cheer:

    Becoming a vegan was an absolute breakthrough for me. I always found myself disinterested in all options except chocolate until I discovered vegan foods. I agree it’s not for everyone though, and you can be healthy on any wholefood diet, and can be unhealthy on vegan diets too.

    Remember food is more than about filling and fueling too, there is an emotional element to food, what is comforting, what ticks the right chemical boxes in your head etc. If you are trying out healthy veganism for health reasons, I would say you have to push past the three day mark, more like through to three to six weeks before you really know if it’s for you. This goes for any new eating pattern, because you’re probably trying to avoid a heap of foods you emotionally love (which is why we feel so deprived without them!). First it takes time for them to be extracted from the cells in your body (often as toxins if they cause toxicity in any way), and as they are released into your blood stream you will probably crave them more than ever. Then over time your taste buds will change as well, especially with cutting out refined sugars. Very quickly you will find sweet things you used to enjoy are now too sweet…but it only takes a bite to get you craving them again!

    I find cutting out sugar is fantastic, reduces my hunger enormously…but unhealthy, fun foods are my weak point, especially when I’m tired or stressed (when I should avoid them the most). So I detox every so often, knowing that there’s light at the end of the tunnel. My everyday diet is vegan, healthy, with a layer of sugared yums on top or in between. More unhealthy than ideal, but I REALLY enjoy it! When it’s out of hand, I knuckle down, cut the junk out, do juices or the lemon detox, and try to ease back into more relaxed eating again. I am a person who gets very bored when eating a salad, they don’t do that much for me (except nutritionally and fiberously). Doing vegan but with some mock meats (and even cheeses if necessary and bearable, they’re a rather imperfect science!) is a great way to transition to vegan if you are committed to it at a values level, but can be quite expensive. But it doesn’t encompass the wholefoods eating, and I don’t consider those things to be particularly healthful, but they help with cravings and comfort. And vegan chocolate…Whittakers dark ghana or Tropical Source choc chips are essential to me. I used to eat a LOT of cadburys…you could call it addiction, but I finally got off it, and with these I can have a bit, but not not feel the need to eat the whole bar, a lot healthier than before! And supposedly raw chocolate is healthy, not so sure, but everything in moderation. Though expensive, it is easy to make and make a variety of flavours.

    Good luck, and when you’re not sure, just remember the reasons you chose it, what date you’re re-evaluating it, and what the indicators of success are!

    #518709
    BronBron
    Member

    regarding the apples – it may be the fructose in the fruit. Your body can’t use fructose so it doesn’t recognise you’ve eaten (doesn’t register in your empty/full tanks). You may find Sweet Poison very interesting reading 🙂

    #518710
    FozzieFozzie
    Member

    I have read before that it’s good to combine apples with some protein, such as yoghurt or nuts to make them more filling. I find apples tide me over for a few hours before tea time if I eat one late afternoon.

    Mmmm… sweet goodness from an apple! Tasty!! 🙂

    #518711
    mistyhollowsmistyhollows
    Member

    And here I am with an orchard full of apple trees 🙁 Guess when you finish one you can always get another 😛 Wonder if that’s why you have the apple and cheese platter. The cheese is the protein :tup:

    Righto it’s 3pm arvo tea time. Time to see if it works. Apples and cheese for the kids too today :laugh:

    #518712

    Yes, apple and cheese. It was my lunch for a few years.

    #518713
    crystalcrystal
    Member

    We always combine fruit with either yoghurt or cheese. otherwise the kids are STARVING way before lunch time. Plus, apples on their own are kinda boring… lol!

    #518714
    SpriteSprite
    Member

    Fructose is not a good sugar, and eating lots of apples (v. high in fructose) will do little for any sort of healthy diet.

    Blood type also has a lot to do with how you digest food. From hazy memory, Type 0 is the most “ancient” type (ie: we were all originally O about 10,000 years ago). Type O digests meat well, and pretty much other food groups in moderation. However often Type O people are mildly lactose intolerant.

    Type A evolved with the advent of agriculture – generally those that digest grains, fruit and veg well are Type A. Type A tend to feel “heavy” after eating meat.

    Type B is relatively new, having only evolved with the development of the dairy industry. They seem to digest cheese, milk, yoghurt much better than other groups.

    Type AB is the newest blood group and combines the best qualities of A and B.

    I also read somewhere that O offers the best protection against common infections such as colds, and A is probably the worst in terms of fighting infection. In our own family, my eldest son and I (both A) tend to be hit harder by anything going through the family than my spouse and younger son (type O)

    I’m sure someone has far better information on this sort of stuff than I do.

    #518715
    SteveSteve
    Keymaster

    Sprite post=336165 wrote: Fructose is not a good sugar, and eating lots of apples (v. high in fructose) will do little for any sort of healthy diet.

    My ears pricked here Sprite. I just became the proud owner of some water kefir grains this week after hearing about all the health benefits from that. But from what I have learnt on the web, the kefir converts sugar to fructose. So maybe it isn’t as good as it is made out to be???

    Do you have any further info on this?

    🙂

    #518716
    BronBron
    Member

    “Sweet Poison” Steve 🙂

    #518717
    smurfysmurfy
    Member

    I wonder if the problem is that you have gone too hard too soon…..trying to cut out so many food types all in one go. A bit of a shock to the system.

    I agree with others that you must trial and error to find what works for you and hubby as individuals. There are so many ideas of what is good and bad….in the end, the eating plan that works for you is the good one IMO.

    The book ‘Sweet Poison’ does offer interesting discussion regarding sugar and its derivatives in the body. This sugar free style of eating worked for the author, but may not for others. A good read though – educational.

    Good luck….hope it works out! At least you have taken a BIG first step toward better health.

    #518718
    SpriteSprite
    Member

    Hi Steve

    Sorry, I must be the only person in the world to actually kill kefir grains (by mistake of course) so am probably not the most reliable source of info as to how kefir metabolises sugars. I’m sure fellow members can provide you with info on this.

    #518719
    SteveSteve
    Keymaster

    Thanks Sprite but my question was more about the fructose in your diet. Sorry… 🙂

    Several sites seem to agree that finished kefir contains about 1.4% fructose. So if my maths is correct, 500ml of water kefir would contain 7g of fructose.

    So assuming that finished kefir contains 1.4% fructose and say two glasses is consumed daily, how would this effect your health?

Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 50 total)
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