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DO YA WANNA TALK GARDENING?

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Viewing 15 posts - 526 through 540 (of 715 total)
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  • #521226
    BobbeeBobbee
    Member

    froot_loopz post=358848 wrote: I was thinking about you the other day bobbee, Ive missed you

    its freezing here in adelaide, I just fell asleep in jeans, jumpers and socks under a doona and didnt wake up covered in sweat

    sorry to hear about your garden Judy. hope you can find a solution soon

    Hi there froot-loopz, :wave:

    Nice to be in touch again. We’ve had a few cool days interspersed with ‘orrible ‘ot and humid ones. I’m definitely not looking forward to the summer season.

    Are you fully fit and on top of things now, and getting that garden into full productivity again?

    :hug:

    PS: It’s nice to be missed. 🙂

    #521227
    BobbeeBobbee
    Member

    mummyjas post=358340 wrote: Planting seeds with the boy tomorrow. Hoping he doesn’t eat all the tomatos this year. Last year he would pick a green tomato and pop it in is mouth, spit it out and then declare “I no like ‘mato” then go back and repeat. He stripped both mine and my mums tomato plant bare!

    My stone fruits are covered in pretty little flowers and I am just itching to find out what they are.

    Have had some lovely weather and been able to get out in the garden with the kiddies and do some cutting back in my terribly overgrown garden. So much geranium! Have filled 2 green bins with geranium and barely made a dent, but at lease I managed to get through to the lemons on the other side of the tree 🙂

    I know what you mean mummyjas, we have what seem like mountains of weeding and clearing to be dealt with here, but each small attack on the weeds gives immediate rewards. And all that digging, bending and lifting is great for health and fitness.

    Oh and good luck with keeping some tomatoes for meals and preserving this year. :laugh:

    :hug:

    #521228
    BobbeeBobbee
    Member

    Hi Frugal Girl, :wave:

    How big is your peach tree? With smallish ones it is possible to hand pick the curly leaf infestations off the tree. We put them in a plastic bag and allow them to rot, don’t put them on the compost of course.

    It can take a number of years to completely rid the tree of curly leaf but it CAN happen.

    :hug:

    #521229
    SnagsSnags
    Member

    Judi B post=358843 wrote: My garden is dying and it has nothing to do with drought things have been slowly dying for the past few years.

    The trees all come out in reduced number of leaves that are a bit distorted, not a healthy green they turn yellow then brown… this is happening to roses, mulberries and apricots, the carob has nowhere the number of leaves it used to have, the plum is looking very sick.

    The vegie garden well nothing is doing well in there…. I dug it up in winter 2011 when it had dried out enough put in new soil mixed with potting mix and cow manure planted some lettuce and they did OK then I put in some spring onions harvested them last year, this year everything turns up its toes so I dug it up as the soil is totally unwettable even with Wetta-soil and about 75mm down it is white and powdery. Now I don’t know if the flooding caused fungal problems or if the soil has been poisoned from chemicals either way my garden is dying 🙁 🙁 🙁

    All you can do is get heaps more organic matter and some bacteria into your soil.

    Plant some green manures

    Water in some manure teas, get some molasses and water that in

    Hope this helps

    http://www.hawaiihealingtree.org/how-to-make-your-own-em-1-inoculant-and-bokashi/?lang=en

    #521230
    Judi BJudi B
    Keymaster

    pavbenth post=358844 wrote: Sorry to hear about your garden, Judi.

    Have your checked the PH and salt levels? Also, what does your soil comprise – just potting mix and manure, or..?

    The soil here is basically sticky black clay over the years I have been improving it with a mixture of manures (horse, sheep, cow, chook, and everything else I can find), potting mix and sand (to break up the clay), mushroom casing, have done molasses, fish and seaweed. I also do trench composting.

    I just think being waterlogged for so long has stuffed up the soil here, but the thing that bugs me the most is the mulberries dying I grew cuttings had them looking really great in the pots and within months of planting out they were dead 🙁

    I haven’t been able to get much in for the past few years only what will fit in a sealed 20L bucket in the back of the car then barrow 250m up to the garden.

    I have some raised beds where things are growing but they cost so much to set up I don’t want to use the soil from the property incase it has been poisoned during the floods.

    #521231
    Frugal GirlFrugal Girl
    Member

    Bobbee post=358855 wrote: Hi Frugal Girl, :wave:

    How big is your peach tree? With smallish ones it is possible to hand pick the curly leaf infestations off the tree. We put them in a plastic bag and allow them to rot, don’t put them on the compost of course.

    It can take a number of years to completely rid the tree of curly leaf but it CAN happen.

    :hug:

    Thanks Bobbee, last year I picked all the infected leaves off but the tree is quite large so I missed a section of it. This year it is only that section that is infected. I might prune that part of the tree right back, but am not sure if Summer is the right time to do it.

    #521232
    SnagsSnags
    Member

    Judi B post=358860 wrote:

    The soil here is basically sticky black clay over the years I have been improving it with a mixture of manures (horse, sheep, cow, chook, and everything else I can find), potting mix and sand (to break up the clay), mushroom casing, have done molasses, fish and seaweed. I also do trench composting.

    I just think being waterlogged for so long has stuffed up the soil here, but the thing that bugs me the most is the mulberries dying I grew cuttings had them looking really great in the pots and within months of planting out they were dead 🙁

    I haven’t been able to get much in for the past few years only what will fit in a sealed 20L bucket in the back of the car then barrow 250m up to the garden.

    I have some raised beds where things are growing but they cost so much to set up I don’t want to use the soil from the property incase it has been poisoned during the floods.

    Gypsum and more gypsum

    fenugreek is a good clay breaking green manure and just grow what ever will grow like a weed and keep mowing it down.

    Can you get a machine in to rip it along the contours to get some water penetration aeration and give some green manure somewhere to start and throw some gypsum in the rips.

    #521233

    I have access to a polytunnel this year so have just planted up my patch with capsicums, chillies and eggplants, with some cucumbers to train up the sides of the tunnel. Hoping for a big feast at the end of the season.

    #521234
    BobbeeBobbee
    Member

    I know I’m back at good old als when I read all the helpful suggestions that fly in when folk are in strife. Thanks people. :clap:

    Hi hillbilly girl, :wave: I reckon a poly-tunnel will extend your growing season rather well, the best of luck with it.

    Nice to see you Snags, :wave:

    We are continuing to collect as much mulch as possible and, as my 70 year old young fella has been helping a neighbour split firewood from 2 large eucalypts that needed to be removed, we now have access to a very large heap of said mulch. :tup:

    I don’t think we can ever have too much mulch, as what isn’t being applied to the garden beds etc just sits there composting away all on its own. :woohoo:

    🙂

    PS: Snags I think access to Judles place is fearfully difficult and hiring machinery is rather expensive. It is a good suggestion though. 🙂

    #521235
    Judi BJudi B
    Keymaster

    Snags post=358863 wrote:

    Gypsum and more gypsum

    fenugreek is a good clay breaking green manure and just grow what ever will grow like a weed and keep mowing it down.

    Can you get a machine in to rip it along the contours to get some water penetration aeration and give some green manure somewhere to start and throw some gypsum in the rips.

    I forgot to mention gypsum we’ve used about 200kg over the years water penetration wasn’t a problem for about 10months it was waterlogged and the water ran through under the house 75mm deep for a while…. aeration was a problem.

    The trouble is we haven’t been able to get anything that wouldn’t fit in a barrow over to the house we had to buy another car and park near the road and everything including groceries came in that way, we now have the pipes in and we are busy cementing them in we had planned on formwork for the sides and ends but we can’t put the stakes in there is a granite boulder right in the way and too big to remove it, about the size of a car but it is low enough that we could still get the pipes positioned correctly.

    The idea of ripping is good but not going to happen this driveway is costing us heaps and having to do it twice in running years really hurts. The garden is now on the back burner lots of things need doing first as DH has been so busy in the gully house repairs need doing and tanks need to be bought guttering on the house has rusted through the list just goes on and on………

    #521236
    roundthebendroundthebend
    Member

    My garden in Ingham was like that Judi after a big flood, couldn’t get anything to grow, was hard back breaking work digging it over to aerate the soil and had to add a lot of organic matter before it would produce again.

    #521237
    Judi BJudi B
    Keymaster

    roundthebend :wave: I hear you this flooding bit just isn’t the usual here 2010 the last 5 months were wetter than any other year we’ve been here and then 2011 with the floods and the place not drying out for a good 6 months I had bullrush growing in the house yard, 2012 wasn’t too bad then 2013 was the worst… I hope to get some horse manure in the next few weeks if DH can figure out what’s going on with the trailer lights.

    I’ve sown excess bean and pea seed and the bird cage cleanings plenty of seed left in that to sprout for a green manure still have a few bags of mushroom casing so when I get the wheelbarrow I’ll be in the garden big time.

    Had a bit of rain yesterday and this morning the air smelt funny not nice rain smell but a moldy, mushroomy off smell gave me a bit of a headache.

    I’ve got beetroot growing and put in 4 cucumber carrots are growing well in the raised beds and zuchs are just coming up the first lot I put in were done in by some hail we got, I want to put in some more beans as the first lot died in a late frost…. and today I harvested our one and only apricot was hard having to share it

    #521238
    BobbeeBobbee
    Member

    Good luck with the upcoming gardening Judi.

    Hi roundthebend, :wave: I noticed your posts on the shout thread. Hope you are fit and healthy now and enjoying life to the full.

    Today I picked broad beans, carrots, beetroot, red cabbage, parsley, my first strawberry of the season, red chard, silver beet, an elephant garlic and shallot tops.

    I intend to dry the broad beans to store so I spent some time on the Web seeking ways to do this. Seems to be a very easy process so all good.

    Did some weeding and mulching and sent lots of snails back to where-ever they came from. So much veg has galloped to seed so have to keep an eye out for when the seed is ready to collect.

    It’s loquot time here and I am planning to bottle lots this year, will probably add alcohol to some of the bottles. Yummo!

    Oh, and I picked a heap of red Russian kale.

    🙂

    #521239
    roundthebendroundthebend
    Member

    Need to get some spinach growing Judi so you have the strength of Popeye to get through all that’s on your plate!

    Hi, Bobbie, feeling back to my old self again and have spent the last 2 days out in the garden planting seeds, transplanting and fertilizing, as we have finally been getting some good rain here after a very dry spell.

    #521240
    BobbeeBobbee
    Member

    That’s nice to hear rtb. :clap:

    We have been trialing growing broad beans with potatoes, giving a crop under ground and another above ground and allowing for the broad beans to be dug back into the soil after final harvest. Giving us a triple benefit. It appears to be working well at this stage, we have had two pickings so far from the beans.

    🙂

Viewing 15 posts - 526 through 540 (of 715 total)
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