Aussies Living Simply

bread

Viewing 15 posts - 46 through 60 (of 61 total)
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  • #514357
    Airgead
    Member

    When I get home tonight I’ll post up a copy of my standard recipe.

    I learned the most from a book called Crust by Richard Bertinet. Its a fantastic book. So is his other one called Dough which covers simpler yeast risen breads.

    I’m also happy to share my starter if anyone doesn’t feel like starting their own.

    Cheers

    Dave

    #514358
    AllyEJ
    Member

    I’m liking this thread. I’ve made standard bread before but I’ve never made sourdough. I would really like to try this.

    #514359
    helenm
    Member

    Bother! Thought I had replied but it seems to have disappeared!

    some good explanations on how to start the culture without yeast are here and a rye one here

    I had never made sourdough either, but have some woofers staying with me who have been carrying their starter with them for about 5 years! They only keep a few spoonfuls of it, then feed it up the day before you bake. Then add loads of flour and more water if necessary on the day of baking. They don’t knead, either but use quite a wet mix and it is delicious! Of course I am going to go the easy route and steal some of their starter, but good luck with yours.

    #514360

    Has anyone tried making bread in the tropics?

    I’m in Darwin with high humidity and high temperatures. I’ve been give a dried sour dough starter which I can get to activate initially but if I’m not monitoring it it goes past bubbly and turns into soup which won’t recover. I’ve tried activating it in an airconditioned room, in the fridge and just at natural room temperature with no success. I’ve tried using it anyway and have made great tasting bricks. Any tips?

    #514361
    fruitful
    Member

    Airgead – I’m going to pm you for a bit of your starter, thanks loads for sharing it

    :hug:

    #514362
    Airgead
    Member

    Sourdough should work fine in the tropics. You just need to cut down on the water in the recipe a little due to the humidity and your rising times will be faster due to the heat so they may not get as sour.

    I have never had any luck with getting dried starters to fire back up again. Apparently it can be done but I have never managed it. I usually send mine out still wet. It may be that you just have a dead starter.

    Fruitful: no problem.

    Cheers

    Dave

    #514363
    Airgead
    Member

    Hi Folks.

    I’ve been promising my sourdough recipe for ages so here it is (this is a basic white bread recipe..the fours can be substituted to make more interesting ones) –

    400g Starter

    800g baker’s flour

    650g water

    20g salt

    Mix into a dough then kneed until smooth and elastic.

    Form into a ball and place in a floured bowl for 1 hour

    Turn out onto a floured surface, re-form into a ball and place back into floured bowl for another hour

    Turn out onto floured surface, divide in two and shape into loaves. Place on tray or in basket. Cover with a cloth and leave to rise. The rise will take anywhere between 4 and 24 hours depending on the temperature.

    Heat oven to as high as it will go.

    Slash tops of loaves and place in oven.

    Bake for 5 min then turn temp down to 220 and bake for another 20-25 mins.

    Cool and eat.

    When making wholemeal I substitute 600g of the baker’s flour for a wholemeal bakers flour and increase the water to 680g.

    The amount of water in the starter here is critical. My starter is 50% baker’s percentage of water (half the weight of flour as water – 400g starter would be 266g flour and 133g water). if your starter is wetter or dryer you will need to adjust the water accordingly.

    Cheers

    Dave

    #514364
    Robyne
    Member

    My old boss said today that a Chinese comapany has bought 10% of Buttercup or goodman fielder, :angry: :angry: :angry:

    It is time the federal governments on both sides, stop the selling off, of our companies here in Australia and farm lands before it is too late :jawdrop: :angry:

    #514365
    fruitful
    Member

    yay, i got fred in the post two days ago, took him out and according to instructions put him in the fridge (labelled and all) went to work and was on my way home when i realised that i’d left him uncovered!!! arrrrggggg, got home (6hrs later) and took out a very cold and dried out fred, refreshed him and left him out – it’s quite cool here – and HE LIVES. phew

    many questions from the family ‘what is this fred in the fridge” and ‘why is it called fred?’

    just pleased that he is a resilient little starter!

    :woohoo:

    thanks (again) dave

    #514366
    Robyne
    Member

    I used your recipe for sourdough many thanks for the recipe :tup: . It was the best bread I have ever made.

    It was baked in the roasting pan as it made so much. I now realize I could of made 2 loaves but it will be eaten. I didn’t need to knead it too much so it was fine with my hands. :clap:

    #514367
    Airgead
    Member

    Robyne – yes.. should have said. Makes 2 large loaves. I usually do a double batch and it does 5 loaves – 1 large, 2 medium and 1 small.

    I’ll have to find some way of showing you the French kneeding technique I use. Much easier on the hands and wrists than the English method.

    Fruitful – Excellent. Let me know how the first fred batch turns out.

    Cheers

    Dave

    #514368
    marigold
    Member

    Is this it Airgead?

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PvdtUR-XTG0

    Aaaaargh! didn’t expect it to do that thought I was just giving a link. Hope it’s OK :shrug:

    #514369
    Airgead
    Member

    Yep. That’s the technique all right. I do a 4kg batch every week that way. Takes about 15-20minutes.

    I find it makes a much lighter dough than the more usual English method and although it is a fairly energetic process its using arms and back rather than wrists and hands so its less tiring.

    Cheers

    Dave

    #514370
    Robyne
    Member

    Since Kenny was repaired I have been using the dough hook. I don’t want to live with taking tablets so I do things when I can. Thank you for the video it is helpful. I have let the granddaughter knead the bread, shes quite good at it. I am thinking of renting her out for jobs. She charges me $2 to polish all my furniture and $1 to rake up the garden after its been cut. She’s learnt if she earns money she can spend it on toys for herself :kiss:

    On Cheapstakes someone put up Bread flour. You add 1 teaspoon gluten flour to 1 cup of plain flour. It would save money as bread flour has risen in price lately

    #514371
    Gumnut
    Member

    I currently have 3 starters on the go. 1 I have had for nearly 6 months the other 2 were started about 6 weeks ago. I started all of them mixing flour and water together and then I added a small piece from loaves I had from different bakeries. I know the yeast inside the bread would be dead but I figured since the bread had sat in the bakeries little yeasty beasties may have settled in the outside crust. Anyway it seems to have worked as they all bubble away nicely etc and they all smell/taste distinctly different (one very yeasty, one like banana and the final one strongly acidic). My question is will they remain distinct or, over time, will they become the same due to the yeast in the local environment?

Viewing 15 posts - 46 through 60 (of 61 total)
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