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Aussies Living Simply

Book Club

Viewing 15 posts - 106 through 120 (of 122 total)
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  • #331765
    BobbeeBobbee
    Member

    I am reading a book that is noted as The international bestseller

    STORIES of PERSONAL TRIUMPH from the FRONTIERS of BRAIN SCIENCE

    The BRAIN That CHANGES ITSELF’ by Norman Doidge, M.D.

    Published by Scribe Publications, Melbourne.

    The book was a pressie and is fantastic.

    The first few chapters were enough to send me off to google more info on the brain

    The book gives info from “scientists, doctors and patients.”

    I have always had a fear of losing my ‘mental capacity’, such as it is, but it’s all I’ve got for this life time.

    This book gives me hope that many folk can ‘come back’ from harshly debilitating strokes and other types of brain damage. I wonder about the possibilities of help for altzheimers sufferers……..

    As usual when I am interested in a certain topic I kind of, bump into it all over the place. For example, I was told of an internet site about the brain, and when I investigated, it is most interesting also.

    The bit I especially liked talked about ‘awakening’ brain cells that are lazily lying asleep still, that’s my interpretation. You might be interested in a couple of exercises we can do to wake up, or stimulate I

    suppose, some of those dormant [?] brain cells.

    1. Take a shower in the dark.

    2. Clean your teeth with the opposite hand to that which you normally use.

    Two very simple actions, which I now do quite often, to help awaken brain cells which we might need one day. I may have misunderstood or be misenterpreting the info but it seems to me if I start to wake up unused brain cells now, then that should give me a head start if I ever need brain cells to help me recover from a stroke, or maybe stop me from developing a disease like altzheimers or some other form of mental incapacity.

    Another thing that happened re the brain is that quite accidentally today, I who rarely watches daytime tv, was knitting and so turned on the telly for something to watch. Low and behold it was an abc program with a scientist talking to the press, sorry but the name slips my mind.

    This woman was talking about the brain and was just so good. And she kind of confirmed to me, some of the stuff I was thinking and said so much more. She talked about altzheimers and that there are ways to stop the disease progressing if you already have it and ways to slow down the beginning of the disease if you are destined to have it.

    :geek::geek::geek:

    AAAANNNDDD that’s not all, 😆

    ALS site is advertising a ‘brain games’ site. And I’ve been there and it’s fun.

    :hug:

    #331766
    BobbeeBobbee
    Member

    I have read ‘Mao’s Last Dancer‘ can’t remember the author or publisher, I had to return the book to a friend.

    This was wonderful reading and gave clear insight into the power of govt in having the control to only allow people to hear and see what the govt wants them to know. The movie showed this too but the book covered it so well. How we can be taught to believe only what those in power want us to believe.

    The POVERTY and the POWERLESSNESS of lack of food and lack of knowledge. :(:(:(

    :awch::awch::awch:

    #331767
    PeterPeter
    Member

    Enjoyed.. The Last Cry,by Mick Woiwod…..set in1840s township of Melbourne..Currently reading The God Delusion by Richard Dawkins

    #331768
    Tassie TigerTassie Tiger
    Member

    For some reason I have not be getting notifications of postings on this thread even though it shows that I am tracking it. Oh well I’m here now and gobsmacked by Bobbee’s posts. For someone who found writing a review to much like hard work she certainly got stuck in:jawdrop: Great stuff. I have read the brain book and I am also hearted by the brains ability to regenerate itself and make new neurological links to compensate for damaged areas.:metal:

    #331769
    Tassie TigerTassie Tiger
    Member

    Well it’s a long time between reads but I finally got to read a book I first came across about 4 years ago when I took my first steps down the simple living path. It is one of the definitive works on voluntary simplicity written originally in 1981 and then revised about 10 years later. Now 30 years on it’s probably more relevant today.

    Title -Voluntary Simplicity – Toward a way of life that is outwardly simple and inwardly rich.

    Author – Duane Elgin

    ISBN -0688121195

    Publisher – Harper

    Availability – My library has never had this book and it has taken me four years to track it down and purchase my own copy. You may have better luck.

    Well, what can I say. This is the book I have be wanting to read for the last four years and it has not disappointed me. It has confirmed that I made the right choice back then and reaffirmed for me that the choice I have made is the only sustainable way forward.

    The last few chapters are of particular relevance to our current societal problems eg. the so called global financial crisis. Chapter six discusses “Civilizations in Transition” and looks at the 4 Stages of Growth in the Life Cycle of Western Industrial Civilzations. The outcomes make for interesting reading.

    Highly recommended

    Hope it’s not so long between reads next time.

    Cheers

    TT

    #331770
    Tassie TigerTassie Tiger
    Member

    Long long time since I visited the site but have just finished reading a most interesting book. Title “Prosperity without Growth” by Tim Jackson. If you get a chance to find this one in your local library I highly recommend it.

    Although it focuses on what changes need to be made at the level of the global economy in order to secure a sustainable future some of the ideas are applicable at the individual level and would be of interest to current or prospective simple livers.

    Anyway, good to be back and hope to speak to old and new friends soon.

    Cheers

    #331771
    BobbeeBobbee
    Member

    :wave:

    Hi TT,

    Missed not seeing you around the site when I came back. trandto has said on another thread ‘Henry David Thoreau’s – Waldon’ that this is a good book so I have downloaded it as it appears to be a pretty good read.

    It’s gets a bit hard on the eyes though, reading from the ‘puter screen, however I am giving it a go. Nothing ventured, nothing gained as the saying goes. :tup:

    Take care,

    Bobbs 🙂

    #331772
    BootstrapperBootstrapper
    Member

    I’ve just finished three books by John Michael Greer (The Archdruid Report) – The Long Descent, The Echotechnic Future and The Wealth of Nature. Unlike many other PO activists, Greer advocates ‘grassroots, ‘bottom-up’ responses to the dilema that a civilisation addicted to growth faces when it runs into the hard natural limits to infinite growth in a finite environment. Not since Toffler (The Third Wave) have I found such a clear, complete description of the dilema faced by Industrial Civilisation. Along with the works of Toffler, Mollison/Holmgren and Schumacher (amongst others), these three books have earned themselves a permanent place on my bookshelf.

    #331773
    dentydogdentydog
    Member

    Hi all,
    As part of my decluttering process I am determined to get back into reading, so that I can define the books that I will keep those that will move on, so think this seems like a good place to make some notes, hopefully a few others will join in 🙂

    Latest Reads…

    Re-read ‘The Celestine Prophecy’ by James Redfield – A book I really enjoyed many years ago, and will definitely be staying on my shelf, a good book to make you more aware of things going on around you. I am planning to order the next installment (the 10th insight) from the library.

    Completed ‘The Life You Can Save’ by Peter Singer – very interesting and moving read. Has motivated me to begin research into the appropriate place to direct some funds to those living in poverty. Will be passing this on to friends as it will not create any awareness sitting in my bookshelf (and I feel quite bad it has taken me so long to read it).

    Reading ‘Resilient Cities – Responding to Peak Oil and Climate Change’ by Peter Newman, Timothy Beatley and Heather Boyer. (this book belongs to others so will be returned once completed)

    Look forward to hearing what you are reading.

    #331774
    dentydogdentydog
    Member

    Have now also started ‘The Transition Handbook – creating local sustainable communities beyond oil dependency’ by Rob Hopkins. Decided one book at a time was too slow two it is!!!

    Happy reading

    #331775
    dentydogdentydog
    Member

    Finished Resilient Cities – good info worth the read and has left to house and returned to where it was borrowed from

    Still reading The Transition Handbook – so far it is good, I may keep this book, but not sure yet…

    Started ‘Leading Change’ by John Kotter (this book belongs to others so will be returned once read)

    #331776
    dentydogdentydog
    Member

    Have finished ‘Leading Change’ … didn’t find it particularly inspiring, however had some good points for noting… returned to others…

    Still reading ‘The Transition Handbook’ and have started ‘The Permaculture City’ by Toby Hemenway which was a Christmas present I requested 🙂

    #331777
    ballamaraballamara
    Keymaster

    I have just started”War of the Celts” by Jack Whyte, it is set in 460 Brittan towards the end of the Roman occupation and the start of the Arthurian legend.

    #331778
    calliecatcalliecat
    Participant

    that sounds interesting – just looked, our library has some of his but not that one
    reading the Cadfael books at the moment

    #331779
    ballamaraballamara
    Keymaster

    I love Cadfael, the books and the tv series. There is about 20 books altogether I think.

Viewing 15 posts - 106 through 120 (of 122 total)
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