Aussies Living Simply

any1 growing Burdekin Plum??

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  • #238673
    shereesheree
    Member

    Just wondering if any1 is growing Burdekin Plum? How big do they get, what is the fruit like and what situation do they like?

    Sheree

    #282349
    Anonymous
    Guest

    g’day sheree,

    dunno if i can tell you much about them, but we ahd one growing on a very sandy loam medium rainfall area, it grew well as a tree well up to about 2.5 meters at the time.

    we kept it heavily mulched as we did with all our trees so they survived on rainfall alone app’ 700mm av’ per year over the the 6 years we where there.

    it flowered and bore fruit, don’t think the fruiting side was successfull but? these little hard fruits i tried one a thought was ripe and it was so tart i think the insides of me cheeks are still stuck together chuckle.

    but i’d say an easy tree to grow and it grew to that size reasonably quickly.

    len

    #282350
    bushybushy
    Member

    Sheree, I have many Burdekin plums, but can’t tell you a lot about their terminal size. The fruit is similar to Davidsons plum, needs to be squashy soft before trying to eat (with sugar). These are growing in rainforest situation and do very well in almost total shade to full sun and are as hardy as any other tree I can think of, ours get no attention at all. Because of their surroundings they have all grown tall and thin but that could be the opposite in a backyard.I tried a google on Burdekin plum and got zero results, seems there is not a lot written about them.

    #282351
    Anonymous
    Guest

    yeh out in full on sun the tree of ours remains bushy and short quiet neat realy looked like it ahd been prunned to a standard shape but all natural, so sounds like they will take a wide range of conditions from sandy loam dryish to rainforest wet. maybe why our fruit wasn’t successful hye not moist enough?

    len

    #282352
    WazzaWazza
    Member

    There are a lot of Burdekins growing naturally in the rainforest area of our block. This is a coastal area with dry sandy soil and they absolutely thrive. There are many small trees growing from natural seeding under the canopy. Dry conditions do not seem to worry them. I haven’t tried the fruits myself, but the Aboriginal people found them palatable. Here are a couple of links with more info:

    http://www.teachers.ash.org.au/bushtucker/burdekin_plum.html

    http://www.daleysfruit.com.au/bushfood/burdekin.htm

    #282353
    shereesheree
    Member

    Thanks 4 the replies, think i will put 1 on our creek bank.

    #282354

    G’day

    I grew up in the Burdekin region and the plum trees were always around in the bush in those days. The tree grows to about 6 m but can get higher if competing for light. The fruit are about the size of a plum but flatter on top and bottom with ridges reminiscent of puckering.

    The fruit like a lot of bush tucker, are an acquired taste. You must let them fall from the tree and then ripen some more. They are very tart especially if green. Aborigines used to bury them in soil to soften. When softened they are a bit sweeter. I love them.

    #282355
    bplumbplum
    Member

    I have a large tree in my suburban yard – heavy clay soil & it is thriving. Have so much fruit I am tossing much of it – does anyone have any recipes? Also have lots seedling coming up – do you want some, Octagonalworld?

    #282356
    bazmanbazman
    Member

    I had to use tree glue to stop ants as they were introducing sucking insects and a black soot to my two young tree’s, the glue worked well, they are starting to take off now thanks to lots of high fungus forest mulch taken from my front native gardens.

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