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Advice on potato growing please

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  • #244743
    muster
    Member

    I’ve just dug up my potatoes and have a few questions. What can I do with the potatoes too small to eat – will they grow if planted in a new bed? My darling chooks are turning over the bed now – what would be good to plant straight into that bed – it was built almost entirely of horse manure and compost?

    I have kiplers & king edwards to be planted now – how far should their beds be from the one that has just produced?

    #365081
    gringo
    Member

    Latest edition Gardening Australia ORGANIC magazine has an informative article on growing spuds.

    As for spuds too small to eat, get rid of them otherwise they will sproutand u will have them popping up all over that bed.

    Suggest a greedy feeder perhaps sweet corn, pumpkin etc.

    #365082
    djc
    Member

    Dig them up, scrub them clean then boil them up as they are – they have to be really tiny for us not to eat ours.( If you really don’t fancy eating them after boiling them give them to the chickens!!). They will grow if they have an ‘eye’ on them(This is where the shoot grows from)

    #365083
    Anonymous
    Guest

    we throw all those little tiny ones into say a stew or even when you are steaming potato’s for mashing (wash ’em first of course), they all potato at the end of the day. they most likely wil grow as well if left undisturbed, this being i always have volunteers grow after a planting season, and i don’t reckon we miss too many only the tinyest ones.

    len

    #365084
    spanner
    Member

    My comment is you need to be carefull about the continual use of the bed …. ie rotation system of beds so dieseases dont occour. I suggest also a different type of veg in the bed such as corn etc.

    As far as being too small are they too small because they are late bloomers or are they too small because they are genetically inferior to the bigger spuds? If the later then dont grow from them as it will result ( I think) in a smaller spud.

    #365085
    roundthebend
    Member

    He He, got to be really, really small not to bother eating them;)

    I planted sweet corn next in my potatoe bed and its doing very well:)

    #365086
    syrill
    Member

    I had another question on potatoes. How do you know when your pototaes are ready to dig up. I have min in baskets with compost and straw then keep building on top. Do the green tops die off then you can dig them up? Also how long do they last and how do you store them. This is my first go at potaotes. Do they last like bought ones. Not to long or can you store them for months??

    Cheers Donna

    #365087
    Yuffie
    Member

    I’ve got a question too… can you pile manure directly onto the potatoes while you are growing them? I am currently only piling on sugarcane mulch, and wondering if I can get my hands on some hourse manure etc and pile them on, would they get burn?

    #365088
    sumasia2
    Member

    when the plants have finished flowering and died back you can harvest however skin will still be soft so potatoes need to eaten soon after harvest. If you wait another 2-3 weeks after plant die back potatoes skin will go firm( just rub skin with finger to see how firm skin is) and are ready for harvesting plus will store better.

    hope that helps.

    phil

    #365089
    scarecrow
    Member

    spanner wrote:

    As far as being too small are they too small because they are late bloomers or are they too small because they are genetically inferior to the bigger spuds? If the later then dont grow from them as it will result ( I think) in a smaller spud.

    On the subject of size…this is from a fact sheet on growing water chestnuts that says:

    SEED CORMS – The size of corms we harvest are variable and typically 80% of our crop is large enough to supply to the market as food. The remaining 20% are retained for replanting or supplied as seed corms. As with seed potatoes they are genetically identical to large ones and so, will not led to small corm size in future crops. The largest size they can be expected to grow to is 50mm in diameter.

    My last order that came through from diggers had very small seed potatoes in it but grew some quite large spudz. :geek:

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