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Adapting to climate change and other disasters

Home Forums OVER THE BACK FENCE Sustainability Challenges Adapting to climate change and other disasters

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 44 total)
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  • #257532
    casalentacasalenta
    Member

    The Mayan calendar thing last year and all the disaster scenarios and talk of impending doom over changes in climate suggest we love to scare ourselves silly that the world is going to end any minute. So I was thinking maybe we ought to spend more energy thinking about how to adapt to whatever gets thrown at us instead of worrying about how bad things will get.

    For me, I think adopting a simple life is a big key to adapting because the less reliance I have on money and ‘stuff’ and the culture generally the easier I will survive if money and stuff become unavailable or the culture collapses. It also helps the environment if we stop all this stupid consumerism. That means as a nation we need to get away from a system that needs economic growth – it’s simply not sustainable and is having untold and disastrous effects.

    Another big key, I think, is growing food where the mouths are, because monocultures and mass food transportation are not resilient, and disasters of all kinds could leave shops empty in a few days. If we all use what bit of land we all have to grow food (esp. using permaculture principles), and if we as communities get together to grow food locally we can solve a raft of problems in one go. We can more easily solve problems caused by changing climate by working small-scale and locally.

    I think we’re too addicted to technology as well. It’s not a problem to use the internet, smartphones, ipads etc. etc., but becoming totally reliant on them and addicted to them makes us vulnerable. We’re getting soft too in so many ways, and need to harden up generally.

    Any ideas on how best to adapt to things like peak oil, expensive electricity, climate change, solar superstorms, and all the other possible disasters that could threaten us?

    Also, most of us are here because we’re learning to be more self-reliant, but everyone around us seems locked on the affluenza treadmill. What, if anything can we do to move society towards more sustainability, and hence more resilience in the face of disasters? All the pollies are locked on the economic growth treadmill and seem to have no clue. So who can we vote for, especially in this undemocratic system we have in which my vote is funnelled to one of the two parties I hate and don’t want, and then they claim they have a mandate. Would getting rid of this system be part of the solution?

    #530241
    SnagsSnags
    Member

    Pretty hard to change the system when the guys making the money control the thoughts through their media.

    #530242
    casalentacasalenta
    Member

    Snags post=352334 wrote: Pretty hard to change the system when the guys making the money control the thoughts through their media.

    So maybe the first step is to turn off the media! Actually it worries me that the government is spending so much money making sure nobody misses a microsecond of TV when the analog signals are turned off. Obviously it’s very important to them that we stay glued to the sets like mindless automatons.

    #530243
    SnagsSnags
    Member

    I imagine the fast TV re-connection was to stop them from spending all their time getting their vital scientific interpretations from Alan Jones.

    #530244
    Anonymous
    Guest

    well we are not into consumerism or shopaholic trends, we don’t seek out and wear designer anything, my wife cuts my hair and hes needs little apart from a tidy here and there, we buy second hand cars at a price we can afford, and budget the use of teh car as town is 30mins away at highway speeds.

    untill the dry came our gardens were producing well, now we have to manage carefully our water use which means les elect’ on demand pump usage. we have just under 1/2 our water capacity of 45k/l(2 tanks), clothes washing once a week and a couple of showers. all second hand water gets used though it is a struggle keeping things going until rain comes.

    what they promote on tv does nothing to make us buy their stuff, we buy necessities and pay our bills. any clothes we buy are chinese or made in sweat shops somewhere.

    so reckon we are living simple in a 54sq/mt home and a necessary 42sq/mt shed.

    anyhow rain soon maybe? one farmer said maybe by end of the month?? 2 weeks away hey.

    len

    #530245
    SnagsSnags
    Member

    Its not really adapting for climate change if we are preying for rain in 2 weeks.

    Getting another tank,mulching or improving water saving is a prep.

    I am seriously looking at another tank major problem is cost but the poor Australians like me , will be faced with lots of extra unseen costs if we do nothing to try and slow down the change.

    #530246
    Anonymous
    Guest

    we’re trying to help change by planting trees that well of the agenda now as we wait for rain, 2 more tanks would be nice what am i saying one more tank would be nice, consumerism hey? pops up all over the place.

    gardens slipping into unproductive no water.

    len

    #530247
    SnagsSnags
    Member

    Extra tanks haven’t been needed in all the time Ive been here, but they will be from now on.

    Its a catch 22 do nothing about consumerism, allow rampant global warming creates consumerism, the need to get more tanks.

    Its way worse than a carbon tax

    #530248
    BullseyeBullseye
    Member

    gardenlen post=352354 wrote: we’re trying to help change by planting trees that well of the agenda now as we wait for rain, 2 more tanks would be nice what am i saying one more tank would be nice, consumerism hey? pops up all over the place.

    gardens slipping into unproductive no water.

    len

    Len,

    How many trees should the world population plant, that end up as living matures trees, to take up all the atmospheric CO2, stored as carbon in the wood, roots and soil to equal the amount the world population has released into the atmosphere.

    An trees per hectare or acre figure would suffice.

    What studies can you provide, even one, that the said number of trees per hectare would be sufficient? You know, so we don’t spend all the time, effort, resources and money on a global project that wont do the job.

    Will there be enough land to plant the trees, and will there be enough land to plant the trees and still have land for food crops?

    Since most of the coal, oil and gas we have been burning didn’t come from the trees that have been cleared from our planet, how are all these planted trees going to take up all the CO2?

    The coal, oil and gas that we have burnt that’s released all the extra CO2, as pollution (as in an excess substance in the environment) have existed in the ground long before the trees from land clearing occurred. How do the planted trees balance out all the CO2 from the coal, oil and gas?

    We need facts, in “hard copy”, that such a plan will reduce our ever increasing atmospheric CO2.

    #530249
    JarnJarn
    Member

    I can see this thread unfolding like many with similar subjects before it, it seems to be a hard subject to contribute information without it turning personal. Anyway I will attempt. water and water use I think will be at the forefront of adaption especially for any of us trying to produce a garden. I have two tanks that I consider my supply, but I have started to install as many as I can in every spot possible. I have found that wheely bins work well with some poly pipe and a few connectors to join them up. they are small enough(slim and 240ltrs) to hide behind trees and in small corners. with 4 you get close to 1000 liters without using up much room. I use the water from these, gravity fed to water all my fruit trees and vegis leaving the two main tanks for the household needs. Some of these tanks I got for free when our local council decided to change recycling waste service providers and the new providers wanted to use their own tanks, so instead of putting the recycling bin out to be collected to apparently be melted down and recycled I kept it and turned it into another tank. I was able to acquire another when a friend moved house and had a spare one that they stored scrap timber in for woodworking.

    Either way they cost $80 at the local hardware and on special you can grab them for $60 and just add them in bit by bit. We are one of the so called poor people (low income)but feel very wealthy with what we have, family, generally good health, fresh food, friends, a roof over our heads and a love for the world, we live in a country with access for all to education and health services, how can money make you more wealthy when you have all this. Ok our government is not the best, but bit by bit things are changing for the better in many areas, maybe not quick enough for most of us but any positive change is good, and I do really believe that we will get there. After all groups like this are an example that people are ready for change and are uniting to make it happen, even without the government. moving forward one step at a time 🙂

    #530250
    Anonymous
    Guest

    as many as it takes bullseye, it has no scientific support sadly that would lessen the strangle hold of science on manipulating the masses.

    as we are replanting exactly none outside of another excuse for diversity in agriculture, then your question is somewhat mute, all we can do here is do what we can here, that is at least provide some natural habitat for the birds, who only ahve pine weeds to live among and native birds are not big on that, nothing so lonely looking as a lonely kookaburra perched on a pine branch.

    oh for you edification they have just cleard more maleleuca scrube to expand the pine industry sunny coast hinterland right beside higway.

    and property owners have no choice but to push over pine tree stands and burn them. yet pine trees are harvested up to bundy and jinka’s to port of brissy for chipping, there must be some science behind that hey chuckle?

    so now that you have asked me? what have you done?

    len

    #530251
    BullseyeBullseye
    Member

    You haven’t provided a trees/hectare figure…

    I’ve answered yours, how about you…

    As an professional field based biologist, as a long term volunteer in numerous environmental programs, I’ve a reasonable contribution.

    #530252
    BobbeeBobbee
    Member

    I must say that I am a firm believer in the fact that if we all do our best in our own corner of the world then that must make an impact on the state of the planet. And, sorry Bullseye I do not have any scientific evidence for that statement, it is just the belief of a person with considerable life experience and some knowledge of the power of the people (once motivated).

    Something we can all do to help, imo, is to spread the message as often as possible, word of mouth info spreads like the ripples on a pond. And every little bit does help, imo.

    We need to have hope and I keep my ‘hope’ fluttering high by living my life in as simple a fashion as possible and keeping my foot print on the earth as small as I can.

    I realise we need governments world wide to leap into gear and weild a heavy hand with big business but meanwhile we small folk can begin the process of repair and cleaning up, imo.

    I have shown before that I do believe the science and I know we need the scientists to help get the govt’s moving and showing what needs to be done on a large scale but I see no reason to knock the efforts of individuals.

    I forget the number of people on the planet just now and I am to lazy to read back up this thread or the others where that info is, but just imagine if every person on the planet picked up a piece of rubbish, planted a tree, grew a few vegs and learned how to grow grains etc, imagine the results.

    We need water and water seems to fall from the sky where there are forests, take a look at water catchment areas, lots of trees there and I know there is a scientific rational for this but I forget that too, although I have read it years ago. My memory is not as good as it was. So the planting of trees is important.

    :hug:

    #530253
    BobbeeBobbee
    Member

    Something I really need to hear is what it is that the scientific community know needs doing to slow down and hopefully stop the planets fall into its worst possible scenario.

    Can someone, hopefully you Bullseye, please explain in simple terms. 🙂

    :hug:

    #530254
    SnagsSnags
    Member

    I think we all agree on planting more trees.

    Its hard to get Governments to change the way big business does anything as big business is way more powerful than government.

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