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100 Items to Disappear First in an Emergency

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  • #497562
    tarabrae
    Member

    Remember, this is just a list of things that DISAPPEAR first in an emergency – not necessarily a list of things that you might actually find useful in said emergency 😉

    It’s a great tool for looking at things that you might want to stock up on because they will be useful to you/yours, but an even better one for looking at items that would be useful for trading with others.

    #497563
    Andre
    Member

    Doc post=313269 wrote: I think an atomiser is a special ray gun used by romulans.

    Of course, I could be wrong :laugh:

    Sorry, no idea really :shrug:

    Doc 😉

    Funny man Doc… (I thought it was Marvin the Martian myself)

    #497564
    Dennis
    Member

    Yes that’s right and its good to have an idea of what might disappear first even if we don’t need it. Good idea to always check you own stock to gauge your survival status.

    #497565
    deee
    Member

    Its a spray bottle. You put water in it and spray it onto your face. Currently popular on long-haul flights. Good to see you haven’t changed, Doc!

    D

    #497566
    Le Loup
    Member

    I thought the term atomiser refered to an asthma spray.

    I think we have that list covered, I can’t think of anything that we would need accept personal medications. I guess if they run out we must simply go without & take our chances.

    We are off the grid, & lived for over 20 years without electricity until we got solar about 5 years ago. I am an 18th century living historian, so turning the clock back 300 years is not a problem for us.

    #497567
    Robyne
    Member

    Went to a car swap meet with Hubby last Sunday and a guy was selling metal cases to store your ammo in for $10 each they were X miltary. So he bought a couple as they are water proof. Holds quite a lot of bullets in packets. All in one space.

    This person was from Qu and travelled around selling things so he might be near you soon. I know there is one in Bendigo in Oct-Nov and Ballarat in Feb.

    You will need to get in touch with a car club to find out when one is on near you.

    He has a huge car trailer all covered in behind a silver grey 4 wheeled drive.

    I think they are a good idea as they can be stacked on top of each other for transporting

    #497568
    Le Loup
    Member

    Robyne post=321811 wrote: Went to a car swap meet with Hubby last Sunday and a guy was selling metal cases to store your ammo in for $10 each they were X miltary. So he bought a couple as they are water proof. Holds quite a lot of bullets in packets. All in one space.

    This person was from Qu and travelled around selling things so he might be near you soon. I know there is one in Bendigo in Oct-Nov and Ballarat in Feb.

    You will need to get in touch with a car club to find out when one is on near you.

    He has a huge car trailer all covered in behind a silver grey 4 wheeled drive.

    I think they are a good idea as they can be stacked on top of each other for transporting

    I think stocking up on ammo is a good idea, but modern ammo is so expensive now! I am very glad I have some flintlock muzzle-loading guns. Best survival gun you can get. [in my opinion].

    #497569
    roadwarrior
    Member

    The larger calibers are expensive, but then it only costs a lot if you are stockpiling or wasting ammo at a range.

    .22 calibre is still the best and cheapest as far as I’m concerned, with a box of 500 rounds for about $40.

    #497570
    Le Loup
    Member

    True, you can do a lot with a .22 when you know its limitations. Not sure on the cost here though, I just purchased 300 rounds of cheap & nasty .22 & 75 rounds of .410, & it cost me $140.00. That to my mind is expensive. But then again, if you look at the price of meat these days, it still works out pretty good. I must find out how much black powder costs these days.

    #497571
    roadwarrior
    Member

    .22 magnums are expensive for what you get. you may as well buy a centre fire. Centre fire rounds average a dollar a pop. This includes shotgun rounds like BB’s or buckshot, but the target rounds are a bit cheaper. .222 and .223 are still relatively cheap, but all rounds are cheaper if you can buy in bulk.

    In the 30 cal range I think 30-30’s are the cheapest, and correct me if I’m wrong but 30-06 are the most expensive out of these common calibers. Larger rounds get more pricey, but then drop-bears aren’t as common these days.

    Shotgun slugs are one of the most expensive at about $5 a round, but are only useful if you want to make very big holes in little piggies and you’ve got more money than you know what to do with.

    For trading I recommend .22’s. Stocking up on this calibre is as good as banking gold…better in fact.

    #497572
    Robyne
    Member

    Hubby was thinking of getting rid of his 2 guns as he can’t life his arm to use them anymore but Son1 has been able to learn to use the .22 mainly for rabbitting. At least he will be able to put food on the table. He has always shown interest in the guns but not to shoot them but now he is a father it is a different case.

    I have been going through my print offs I have and found a couple that you might like to look at

    http://www.foodlifeboat.com.au

    its mainly Australian food but gives a good idea on what to stock pile. I personally write down what we eat and then buy that in bulk. I have seen people stock up on food and never eat it.

    Another is how to preseve Wheat as it has been brought up a few times it might be of help for people. http://www.articalsbase.com/print/1645795 It was posted in Dec.2009.

    And the last one I thought would be of use is Your Personal Mise en Place it means haveing stuff ready.

    Like having tins of tomatoes, sauce, bottles pasta sauces either yours or shop bought, flavoured tomatoes.

    Pasta, rice, grains, and beans

    Baking stuff Flour, sugar, cornflour, Baking powder, bicarb, flavourings, cocoa, treacle, honey etc. sweetener is up to you,

    Herb and spices what you use in your cooking should either be stored or grown in the pots outside the door, I have several pots of herbs doesn’t take up much room and they look good on a verandah.

    Tinned meats are handy for quick meals, tuna salmon, meat

    Vinegars and oils,

    Pickles, olives and sundried tomatoes

    can be added to food for extra flavour

    Jams, peanut paste, and sweeten sauces.

    I keep cooking chocolate to make ice cream sauce I make my own jams and peanut pastes as shop ones send granddaughter silly with all the chemicals in them.

    Tinned food is good as a back up, like fruit, beans, corn,

    Ethnic products are also a great source of flaouring Soy sauce, teriyaki sauces, pasta sauces, and salad dressings are a good back up.

    Bread and cereals are another back up Bread flour stored correctly can be madeinto bread, pizza bases, rolls wraps etc.

    This is just a few ideas best to write down what you have and date the containers

    #497573
    Le Loup
    Member

    Robyne post=322067 wrote: Hubby was thinking of getting rid of his 2 guns as he can’t life his arm to use them anymore but Son1 has been able to learn to use the .22 mainly for rabbitting. At least he will be able to put food on the table. He has always shown interest in the guns but not to shoot them but now he is a father it is a different case.

    I have been going through my print offs I have and found a couple that you might like to look at

    http://www.foodlifeboat.com.au

    its mainly Australian food but gives a good idea on what to stock pile. I personally write down what we eat and then buy that in bulk. I have seen people stock up on food and never eat it.

    Another is how to preseve Wheat as it has been brought up a few times it might be of help for people. http://www.articalsbase.com/print/1645795 It was posted in Dec.2009.

    And the last one I thought would be of use is Your Personal Mise en Place it means haveing stuff ready.

    Like having tins of tomatoes, sauce, bottles pasta sauces either yours or shop bought, flavoured tomatoes.

    Pasta, rice, grains, and beans

    Baking stuff Flour, sugar, cornflour, Baking powder, bicarb, flavourings, cocoa, treacle, honey etc. sweetener is up to you,

    Herb and spices what you use in your cooking should either be stored or grown in the pots outside the door, I have several pots of herbs doesn’t take up much room and they look good on a verandah.

    Tinned meats are handy for quick meals, tuna salmon, meat

    Vinegars and oils,

    Pickles, olives and sundried tomatoes

    can be added to food for extra flavour

    Jams, peanut paste, and sweeten sauces.

    I keep cooking chocolate to make ice cream sauce I make my own jams and peanut pastes as shop ones send granddaughter silly with all the chemicals in them.

    Tinned food is good as a back up, like fruit, beans, corn,

    Ethnic products are also a great source of flaouring Soy sauce, teriyaki sauces, pasta sauces, and salad dressings are a good back up.

    Bread and cereals are another back up Bread flour stored correctly can be madeinto bread, pizza bases, rolls wraps etc.

    This is just a few ideas best to write down what you have and date the containers

    May I respectfully suggest that you get a licence yourself. My wife has a licence & her own .410 shotgun just in case.

    #497574
    missy71
    Member

    Can I add that if you have a licence, make sure you renew it on time otherwise the drama is all too much to bear. Hubby’s expired in May and he had to reapply a couple of weeks later. He is still waiting for his new licence to show up and it is nearly September. Calls to find out what is happening are futile because they all go to one place to be processed. Too bad if he needed it for his employment or something. :pinch: In the meantime, he’s had to move all weapons off-premises to someone else’s house and the police can show up anytime for an inspection to make sure they’re gone.

    #497575
    narelleh
    Member

    after having been thru a few emergency situations in the last few yrs – i have found that the first few things to dissappear in such an event is slightly different to those listed

    In no particular order I have found the following dissappear very fast:

    batteries; candles; fresh milk; bread; fresh vegetables; fresh fruit; UHT and powdered milks; fresh meat; loo paper; gases (butane or LPG) and fuels; jerry cans;generators; dairy products and fresh products; frozen products; basic tinned products

    I have a loo paper fetish so always make sure a have a whole pile of that and normally in an emergency we manage ok cos I am aware of the shortages and stockpile earlier

    We found ourselves caught short with jerry cans earlier this year tho :blink:

    #497576
    Le Loup
    Member

    missy71 post=322102 wrote: Can I add that if you have a licence, make sure you renew it on time otherwise the drama is all too much to bear. Hubby’s expired in May and he had to reapply a couple of weeks later. He is still waiting for his new licence to show up and it is nearly September. Calls to find out what is happening are futile because they all go to one place to be processed. Too bad if he needed it for his employment or something. :pinch: In the meantime, he’s had to move all weapons off-premises to someone else’s house and the police can show up anytime for an inspection to make sure they’re gone.

    Another advantage to having more than one licenced person in the same household.

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