WASHING UP IN THE SINK

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If you"™re trying to get rid of nasty chemicals in your home, dish washing may be one area you could look at. I stopped using the dishwasher a while ago and am now happily washing dishes, by hand, with soap.
If you’re trying to get rid of nasty chemicals in your home, dish washing may be one area you could look at. I stopped using the dishwasher a while ago and am now happily washing dishes, by hand, with soap. I initially went to detergent but soon realised it’s not as green as soap, so now my arsenal has changed. Now I use homemade cotton dishcloths, a scrubbing brush, laundry or homemade soap and a dish mop. That dish mop is a wonder to me, but I’ll get back to dish mops again later. I tend not to use rubber gloves. I don’t like buying them, if I use the dish mop I can use very hot water and I make sure I use hand cream every night so my hands don’t dry out too much from the soap and hot water.

Step one is to remove as much gunk from the dishes as I can and then stack the dishes waiting to be washed. I place cutlery into a mug or jug that needs to be washed so it’s not all over the place. Glasses and cups are next to the dishes. Pans are kept on the stove until they’re washed.

I wash up in this order, but you can vary it as long as you’re washing the least dirty progressing to the dirtiest or greasiest: glasses, glass jars, cups, saucers, all plates, cutlery, bowls, saucepans, frying pan.

I use the hottest water I can stand and our solar hot water is very hot. The dish mop helps me handle the dishes in hot water as I don’t have to put my hands right into the water. As the water is filling the sink, I let the water pour over the soap and I rub the soap onto my dish mop. This makes the water milky, that is good. There are very few, if any, bubbles. That is also good.

I wash every item, making sure I get inside the glasses, jugs and jars with my dish mop. Everything is then placed into the rinse sink to rinse in cooler water, then placed in the dish rack to dry. I never wipe up.

I use my scrubbing brush for saucepans and the frying pans. If they’re really dirty, or have burnt on gunk, I use one of those steel scrubbers. They last for a long time. One will effectively clean your pans for at least six months.

When I’ve finished washing the dishes, I empty the water out of the sink and wipe it out with the dishcloth. Then I rinse both the dishcloth and the dish mop in cool clean water and wring as much water out of them as I can manage. I shake the dish mop to separate the cotton fibres and put it, upside-down, into a jar near the taps. The cloth is then placed over the side of the sink to dry.

Every day or two I change the cloth. Every week I soak the head of the dish mop and the steel scrubber in a weak bleach solution to clean them. These simple routines keep pathogens at bay and will keep your cleaners going for a long time.

Washing up this way allows me to keep a clean kitchen without buying too many products. There are no cloths in plastic wrapping, no detergent, nor the bottle it comes in, no dishwasher detergent, which is fatal if you ingest it. It’s a simple but effective routine, it’s frugal and as close to green as I can manage.

Addit for those who use dishwasher tablets: Last week I had an email from my sister who had the plumber around to fix her dishwasher.  One of the problems was the amount of gunk built up in the dishwasher.  The plumber told her not to use the dishwasher tablets as they lather up too much.

I don’t use store bought liquid soap but here is some interesting reading about it:

http://www.smh.com.au/news/style-notes/getting-in-a-lather/2007/09/05/1188783305377.html
Written by :
forest
 

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